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ICCF hosts postal play and has various competitions including THE world championship for postal. Check out https://www.iccf.com/ The USCF also hosts the old CL&R postal games now that they have taken over that old magazine via a merger with CL. Check out http://www.uschess.org/content/blogcategory/82/393/ I suspect that their postal play is via the ...


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Whent I played in ICCF the rules were any sort of reference help other than another person was allowed. That was mainly books back then. I had wondered if Berliner had used his IBM access to help win the world championship in the 60s. And I understand that now they specifically allow computers as well as books. There is no way for them to know if ...


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Yes, it is legal. ICCF: Says nothing about it, or assistance of any kind, and you can even use computers legally. Here are their rules. USCF: "3. You may consult chess books and periodicals but not other players." Here are their rules. With regards to the ICCF rules, my guess is that they just decided it was too hard to police computer used, so they just ...


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It might. It depends how you use the game to augment your study and how you apply what you did study to make moves in the game Just playing is nice for experience but not really that useful when compared to study of openings, tactics, end games, tactics, strategic items like pawn structure, and tactics -- at your level of ability.


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If you can get great learning value from playing correspondence chess (which usually nowadays allows engine use) or not, depends on your determination to use it as a learning device. Let's assume, as you state, that you are a 1200 rated player, that you have no particular opening preparations, that you have a high error rate if it comes to tactics and that ...


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Note: This was answered before the OP edited the question, and specified it was an online competition. According to ICCF (international) rules, yes, it is still a draw. 6.7 Except where one of the Articles 5.1 or 5.2 applies, if a player does not complete the prescribed number of moves in the allotted time, the game is lost by the player. However, the ...


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Since the GM would also use an engine then he should win as he can add his own judgement to what the computer suggests. I still say Hans Berliner used an IBM 360 to help him win the world correspondence championship.


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