New answers tagged

14

I will answer in the first line of the next paragraph, but there is a lot of history that happened right around the time Kasparov made this comment, so I will add in some of that too. At the Tilburg tournament in November 1997, Kasparov was not known for holding his tongue, and he called Grandmaster Shirov, who was 2700 and 8th in the world, a "talented ...


0

I think Chaturanga grew up at a time when there were three kinds of auxiliary troops: elephants, cavalry and chariots, which were deployed on the wings. With one general, that makes 7. However an odd number would mean that the elephants of one side are on the same colour square. So one can rationalise eight as the sweet number. However Chinese chess is 9x10 ...


47

Rashid Nezhmetdinov, aka “Super Nezh”, was clearly GM strength, having a plus score in the 20 games he played against World Champions, including a plus score against his friend, Tal. He was also a five-time Russian champion (this title predates the Soviet Union, and is not the same as champion of the Soviet Union). I was a Russian linguist in the Air Force ...


5

This site appears to have old rules of chess, FIDE and otherwise I do not attest to the accuracy or completeness of this site


2

The only source I know is The Retro Corner. Unfortunately, it hasn’t been kept up to date, but together with the FIDE site itself, it should give you coverage back to 1977. The rules are hardly perfect, but there have been continual improvements in writing quality over time. Specific changes have mainly been in various kinds of draws, and filling various ...


2

Pseudocode to iteratively compute morphy number. assume you have a database with a table plays of two columns x and y where a row indicates two indeviduals who have played one another. _morphy = {} def Morphy(name): if name == 'Morphy': return 0 if name in _morphy: return _morphy[name] _morphy[name] = math.inf score = math.inf ...


3

As far as an algorithmic answer goes, if you can get a set of games into a pandas dataframe (Python), the following code should get you the Morphy numbers, unless I've messed up somewhere: def get_distances(games, starting_player = 'James Morphy', max_depth = 100, white_col_name = 'white' ...


1

Morphy numbers are something new to me. It is the degrees of detachment little world marvel for chess players. I was looking Gligoric and discovered he had a Morphy number of 3. So Morphy (1837-1884) has a Morphy number zero. Any individual who played him has a Morphy number of 1. Any individual who played a Morphy number 1 has a Morphy number 2, ...


1

A similar question was asked on another forum a few years ago, and the answer that was given was "Alan Turing wasn’t a very strong chess player at all. He was probably at the level of a beginner. He certainly knew the rules of the game, but not much more." Wikipedia notes, regarding the chess program that Turing and a colleague designed, "... the algorithm ...


2

Early on, chess is clearly just a game, but as you advance competitively, its character changes. For me, that change happened when I was about 1800-2000. I was a ranked (state, not nationally) junior tennis player in the early 1970's, so I know what a sport feels like, and master-level chess takes just as much out of me as tennis did when I was a kid. Part ...


5

I had a similar problem not long ago, though not chess related. If I were to pattern this solution off of that one, I would consider storing Morphy in an SQL table along with all of his opponents, along with all of their opponents, and so on, in a parent/child relationship. So you would have one table with two columns (id and parent_id). id would be the ...


7

I never heard of the 'Morphy number' until I read your post. I found that my Morphy number is 5. Here is how I did it. I started with Wikipedia After looking at the list I realized that my best bet was the simul where I played John Donaldson. I still regret not pushing the pawn after preparing it so well... I looked at other American players John ...


9

You'd have to find a list of players Morphy has played. Then, you'd research as many players who played each of those players. This can all be done by searching by player in a large database. Eventually you'd have a large tree, and the problem comes down to an optimal search algorithm. You'd search "branches" with a more likely chance of giving you a small ...


0

There is no magical way of finding it, of course, you just have to know the history of the people that you have played and then you can deduce your Morphy number. Of course, it is highly likely that the chain never reaches Morphy.


3

The question doesn't indicate what context it's being asked in, but at least in the US (in USCF events), adjournments are generally not used because most tournaments are played using sudden-death time controls. This makes it easy to predict (at least approximately) when a round will end, because a player can't get an additional time period by completing a ...


8

Adjournments are still used but very rarely. They are deprecated and this is shown by the path that the FIDE Laws of Chess have taken over the years in prescribing their use.In the previous incarnation of the laws they were covered in an appendix. In versions before that in the main body. In the discussions preceding the release of the current rules there ...


13

Primarily because computers have rendered adjournments obsolete. In addition, with the advent of digital clocks with delay or increment, it is much more fair to have people play it out over the board. It is much better to have the players decide it than having a team of people helping them overnight, or nowadays, a strong computer.


4

A few things: 1) Ratings overall tend to rise due to inflation of more players entering the pool, rather than the average playing strength of players increasing. If everyone becomes better by some factor due to engines, why would top players' ratings increase? They're now playing opponents who have also gotten stronger by roughly the same amount. 2) ...


16

The question is apparently based on a misunderstanding of how ELO ratings work. There is absolutely no mechanism by which the overall increase in players' strength would lead to increase in their ELO. The actual value of the ELO rating bears no meaning; nor does the comparison of ELO at distant times. The only thing that has direct relevance is the ...


24

I think they certainly have increased their ELO, but more importantly, their overall chess strength. ELO is only a rating relative to others in the pool so it may tend to go up more slowly if everyone in the pool gets better, which they have collectively. First, you need to take an average of the top players, rather than look at just two incredibly special ...


9

If those engines have a 3600 Elo, shouldn't top players have profited from it to leave Kasparov's 2851 score in 1999 far away? No. The main effect of engines and also the internet has been to democratise chess. The top players have always had access to top level evaluation and knowledge. For lower level players that kind of knowledge, analysis, position ...


3

This is in addition to PhishMaster's answer elsewhere: According to https://www.chess.com/players/shakhriyar-mamedyarov, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov was born in Sumgait, Azerbaijan SSR, Soviet Union, on April 12, 1985. He is the Azerbaijan’s top player, and has becaome the only player ever to win the World Junior Championship twice (winning it in 2003 and 2005). ...


9

I have read a lot about them over the years, and I have never heard anything that would lead me to believe that they are anything but true Azerbaijanis, and have both played under that flag forever. Both were born in Azerbaijan while it was still part of the Soviet Union. Speaking Russian is simply explained by the fact that since both born in Azerbaijan ...


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