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0

Can't speak to FIDE as their use of ratings is relatively newer, but I recall that the USCF had once taken a couple of years to publish ratings because it was done by hand and the guy was busy or procrastinated in doing it. Or maybe there had been so many tournaments at once that it just took him that long to catch up. Once computers came into common use ...


2

I recently ran a "blitz" chess tournament, where each player had to make all their moves in five minutes, and interpreted the rule to be you must push the clock with the same hand you moved with, but made no effort to say you always had to use the same hand for every move. This just stopped the players from having a hand hovering over the clock while they ...


0

That is all very silly. It the KG is as fine in most lines for top players as much as for amateurs. The computer gives equal or tiny negative in most lines, plus in others. But does so when white is down a pawn. That means that it considers that White has an attack advantage that is equal to a pawn. Equal from a computer when you have gambited a pawn means ...


19

Was playing with both hands ever allowed in chess? Yes, before 1997. Hence in 1995 Kasparov was not breaking the rules. The key article in the the FIDE Laws of Chess is: Article 4: The act of moving the pieces 4.1 Each move must be made with one hand only. This first appeared in the 1997 edition of the FIDE Laws of Chess. The previous edition, ...


7

Yes. In the past that was not part of the rules. Forcing use of one hand gives an advantage to the person with the clock on the side of their handedness. Otherwise the player has to reach across the board to toggle the clock after having moved. This takes longer and blocks their view which is a big handicap in short time games as well as time ...


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