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2

No. It may implicitly 'know' internally but none of them explicitly tell you there is/are/couldbe transpositions.


1

I leave a partial answer for interested parties: Scidb (Scidb is a Chess Information DataBase) is a chess information database. (Great sentence.) It supports some variants (3-check, King of the Hill, Anti/Suicide/Giveaway/Losers, and Crazyhouse), as well as 960 starting. It is currently still in development, and is available only for Linux systems at the ...


3

For correspondence I keep a database of my personal opening book that I extend whenever I encounter a new move. I include notes on things like why I chose a particular line and both numeric and verbal position assessment. I also include select text from books or other databases that discuss that position.


3

The question is why only one database? I have a database of my own games, and a second for casual games I find interesting. You could have one for your OTB games, and correspondence games, for example. Beyond that, you could have a database of both your white and black repertoire. This is very common among higher-rated players. Lastly, if you are really ...


2

Do you mean a personal database of selected games? If that's the case, you're better off getting one of the databases with millions of games in it, since you can just search that for what you need.


2

Pseudocode to iteratively compute morphy number. assume you have a database with a table plays of two columns x and y where a row indicates two indeviduals who have played one another. _morphy = {} def Morphy(name): if name == 'Morphy': return 0 if name in _morphy: return _morphy[name] _morphy[name] = math.inf score = math.inf ...


3

As far as an algorithmic answer goes, if you can get a set of games into a pandas dataframe (Python), the following code should get you the Morphy numbers, unless I've messed up somewhere: def get_distances(games, starting_player = 'James Morphy', max_depth = 100, white_col_name = 'white' ...


1

Morphy numbers are something new to me. It is the degrees of detachment little world marvel for chess players. I was looking Gligoric and discovered he had a Morphy number of 3. So Morphy (1837-1884) has a Morphy number zero. Any individual who played him has a Morphy number of 1. Any individual who played a Morphy number 1 has a Morphy number 2, ...


5

I had a similar problem not long ago, though not chess related. If I were to pattern this solution off of that one, I would consider storing Morphy in an SQL table along with all of his opponents, along with all of their opponents, and so on, in a parent/child relationship. So you would have one table with two columns (id and parent_id). id would be the ...


7

I never heard of the 'Morphy number' until I read your post. I found that my Morphy number is 5. Here is how I did it. I started with Wikipedia After looking at the list I realized that my best bet was the simul where I played John Donaldson. I still regret not pushing the pawn after preparing it so well... I looked at other American players John ...


0

In general, no. The games between players of higher levels (going from beginner --> amateur --> master --> grandmaster --> correspondence) tend to be better, and they are what usually dictate theoretical trends. If there was some well known line that was dubious, a GM couldn't get away with playing it often because their GM opponent would be prepared. There ...


9

You'd have to find a list of players Morphy has played. Then, you'd research as many players who played each of those players. This can all be done by searching by player in a large database. Eventually you'd have a large tree, and the problem comes down to an optimal search algorithm. You'd search "branches" with a more likely chance of giving you a small ...


0

There is no magical way of finding it, of course, you just have to know the history of the people that you have played and then you can deduce your Morphy number. Of course, it is highly likely that the chain never reaches Morphy.


4

It really depends on how broadly you want to define the openings. For example, while not popular at that level, GMs have played the Smith Morra. Of course, a standard open Sicilian is better. The same goes for those, who have played the King's Gambit when trying for the Ruy Lopez is better. The Ruy Lopez is probably objectively better than the Italian ...


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