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1

After 13...c5 white had a pretty big advantage. After that there are wide swings between both sides for the rest of the game with the advantage changing 6 times. That means the opening had zero effect on the outcome of the game. That being said, 8. Ne5 was a pretty weak move. After 8...Qd4 how are you going to both protect the knight and prevent black ...


2

The computer says you're ahead after the move you played. But you're only up a little, and you ended up with only a rook and opposite-colored bishops along with the pawns. You still have to work for the win; it's not like the extra pawn ices the win for you in the simplified position. The reason that the computer considers it a mistake is that you had ...


8

Losing an exchange is itself enough to make the move weak. You go from being up R+P for N, which is a winning advantage, to up just one pawn with opposite color Bishops, which could often be drawn. The move is also weak because you let White off the hook: you were on the attack against White's exposed King, so the trade of Queens made the position "easier ...


4

I think there are a few things here. When playing a gambit line that maybe you do not know, the first thing I would recommend is not necessarily taking it. Either 3.Ne5 or even 3.d4 look safer. On move four, you had the choice of taking two pawns, one that developed his N, and the other, which took a center pawn. The center P was easily the right way to go ...


1

Sometimes there's some practical value in taking a line others feel is unplayable and making it somewhat playable. At best, you should be aiming for a line that gives the opponent lots of chances to go wrong but allows you drawing chances if the opponent plays perfectly. I could give ideas but your opponent could be reading this too. It's best to come up ...


0

Lichess as a website - as mentioned by Chromatix - offers the Board editor online and in the app. Lichess is free software.


1

Most general-purpose chess software has this feature, usually under "Edit Board" or similar menu entries. On Linux, usually there are two components to the software which are developed independently - a board program and a playing engine; the latter acts as an opponent or an analyser. The board program, such as Scid or Xboard, is where you would look for ...


2

You don't mention what platform you are using, but on Android I use the "Analyze This" app - it lets you set up positions from scratch, and also use an engine to analyze. There is a free version of the app, and a paid "Pro" version. In the free version, the only available engine is Stockfish; in the "Pro" version, you can add other UCI engines.


1

ChessBase, or even the lesser priced Fritz, allow you to do that. Just open a board, and type in "S", and it will let you put in whatever position you want. (They both allow you to then analyze from there.)


2

Piece values are largely based on the mobility of the pieces. ie a queen is more valuable than a rook because a queen can move to more squares. In fact, you could almost break it down to a mathematical formula (number of moves=piece value)except for certain circumstances like the knight's jumping ability or the fact that bishops are locked onto one color ...


3

After 20...Ng8 21. Nc6! Re5 22. Ne5 and wins f7 too due to the dual threats of Nd7 and Nf7, both winning the exchange. So, 22...Nf6 is forced, and white is just winning there. It is going to be Q vs. R, B, and two pawns; but the problem is that white will control both files, and the black K is still not safe. [fen "r4rk1/pp3ppp/1qpQ1n2/4nN2/8/1B2P3/PP3PPP/...


4

For starters, 13.Kb1 is considered the main line and scores at 73% to only 51% for 13.h5. In general, I do not think it is very good to ever allow the Rc3 exchange sac there. In the main line, 13.Kb1 Nc3 14.Bc4 Rc4 15.g4 Rfc8, Karpov already would play 16.Nde2 there (or a very similar position), and he won some great games. 19.gf was already a big mistake ...


18

This is a very famous position. Well, here are some reasons, and there are quite a few: Since this was a Candidate’s Match to qualify to play Spassky, it comes down to exact calculation above all. Fischer calculated that it was good, and his judgement bore out since the game only lasted another 12 moves. Here are some things that probably contributed to ...


5

First, I assume that you mean 15.h4 (not h5). If so, the main reason is that a lot of master-level chess is restricting your opponent's pieces, or in this case, even driving them back. The Ng6 has no good squares, and h5 driving to to a worse square is threatened. If 15...Be7; 16.h5 Nf8, and not only has the Ng6 been driven back, and still has no good ...


2

First of all it kind of depends on your playing strength, but every player can benefit at least a bit from an engine. Personally I use the engine for the following analysis: Opening preperation: I play out different variations of my opening with the engine running. I do this so I dont miss any critical good moves of my opponents. For myself I dont ...


1

I've done it both ways (computer first, and human first) and I think you can learn either way. The important step is "human last," meaning the human needs to go over the computer's analysis to be sure they understand it, because that's where a lot of the learning occurs. If I'm going to start with myself analysing, then I will play through it, trying to get ...


3

I guess a lot of it depends on how strong you are. I understand what I am trying for in my games, but that does not always mean that I am efficient in achieving the aim. Sometimes, the computer shows me a good line quickly. In addition, I am human, and short of being Carlsen, and even he misses things, the computers is great for pointing out what you miss, ...


2

I think something like this is the easiest solution. The set-up takes 16 moves, but then it's only two more moves to checkmate and you don't need a computer to verify it. This is almost the same as Akavall's set-up, except that a knight is posted on c4 instead of g4. [FEN ""] 1. a4 null 2. d4 null 3. h4 null 4. Nf3 null 5. Na3 null 6. Nd2 null 7. Ne4 null ...


2

After: 23 ..f3 24 Nxf3 Bg4 You are threatening Bxf3 to win a piece, since the g2 pawn is pinned. So sacrificing the f3 pawn gives you great initiative and attacking options, and keeps white pinned down. Even if white moves the king to avoid the pin, with say Kf1, you can take in f3 with the rook and if white captures back with the pawn Bh3 is mate: [...


3

In the first position, f3 is good because it will open the white K after Nxf3 Bg4 then Bxf3 or maybe Rf3 in some cases as the light squares will be very weak (the analysis gave up the Nf3 with Ne5 immediately since the position was so bad that giving up a piece was "best"...if that is best, then it is dead lost). What is left is a HUGE Nc5 compared to a ...


0

This position is won for black. A king can't stop stop two connected passed pawns. I don't know who Tim Krabbé is but any beginner should be able to see this a won position for black in about 30 seconds. Even if white creates a passed pawn on the kingside, he can't stop black's connected passed pawns and black has tempo moves. At the very least white ...


2

I'll go along with Qxa8 wins a rook right now, as opposed to one move later. But you're about to discover something about chess engines, which will be useful later on, no matter how good you get at chess. The line the intrigues me is 8. Qxa8 Nc6 with the idea of trapping the Q out of play for a while. What can Black get from that? So perhaps at this point, ...


0

Qxa8 wins a rook and is almost certainly a won game for white. Bd3 threatens mate but is easily countered. Always assume your opponent makes the best reply. Making a move and hoping your opponent doesn't see the reply is "hope chess" and won't get you very far.


2

On my quad-core running Stockfish 10, the evals are very close, but Bd3 is preferred, and to me, I agree since you develop a piece with tempo, black defends the mate, and then you still take on a8 winning. It is really about the same, but Bd3 is slightly better on my engine. Basically, your intuition is right, and maybe your engine or computer are not as ...


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