New answers tagged

2

You could try PGN ChessBook Which is a free app that has some good automatic blunder-check / game-annotation features. It can find blunders, then automatically annotate the game by inserting variations and (optionally) adding comments to the blunder moves, which can then be printed out, as described in this video How to find and print out game blunders using ...


1

This is a simple question that deserves a simple answer: This position is neither checkmate or stalemate. Checkmate is where the player to move has no legal moves and is in check. Stalemate is where the player to move has no legal moves and is not in check. In this position, either player would have legal moves if it was their turn, so neither definition ...


10

"41.75% win" seems even worsely misleading. The value is technically true for a random position: some stats, but based on the immensely high probability that QxQ or a skewer wins on the spot. In a "neutral" position the chances are more like 0.4175% - if you can't capture or skewer the Q immediately, the only longer win is the Polerio ...


12

considering my 41.75 per cent winning chance, how do I have to play in order to defeat my opponent if he/she and I both get a queen? First of all you need to understand what is meant by "41.75% winning chance". It does NOT mean that your chances of winning are 41.75%. What it means is that in 41.75% of the games considered the game ended in a win ...


2

In this specific position, there is nothing better than to force a queen trade (and the draw) by playing ... Qb7+. Most good players would have agreed tp a draw no later than the 3rd move as they know that this position will end with in a draw with just reasonable moves. There are examples of both sides queening, but one sides wins due to an immediate ...


2

Just my opinion. The best move is the one with the best evaluation, with the exception of the "computer moves" which only delay the real threat for a move. A brilliant move is not only good but has a surprise value. A correct sacrifice easily qualifies, but a move with an unusual (and correct plan do tend to be brilliant. There are two examples: ...


7

Calling it an "inaccuracy" is nothing more than the engine saying that it evaluates the position after one move to be a certain amount better than after another move. It doesn't necessarily mean a move is "bad". Both d-pawns cannot be kept no matter what Black does. After 1...Ne4, if White plays Nxe4, the recapture will leave the c4 ...


1

Once clear material down against an AI, with no compensation, I would resign immediately without shame. No point limping on. There is nothing to learn by going forwards since the imbalance dominates all positional thinking. Have a look to figure out what was the mistake, and then use the released time to play another game. After development, if there are no ...


1

Lichess generates puzzles from your games automatically.


4

I found this reddit post which has two comments which answer this question. link https://tactics.bitcrafter.net/ This is essentially exactly what I was looking for and bonus points in that I think I found their github that has their code which seems shockingly simple link I made something like that, both open source http://chesstacticsgenerator.vitomd.com/ ...


7

Lichess has the "learn from your mistakes" feature, which can be used to play your significantly bad moves in a game as a puzzle. From your profile, select a variant/time control on the left, then click "view the games" in the top right. Click on a game, go to the analysis board, and at the bottom, in the "computer analysis" ...


10

I don't know of a single program that does all that. I do it myself with following steps. I save most of my games in a pgn file. The interesting ones, esp. my losses, are analyzed by Stockfish. The "blunder threshold" is your choice, typically 3 - 5 pawns or more. With Notepad++ text editor I enter the FEN of the position in a pgn file, of course ...


8

How? Yourself :-) This should not discourage you from getting the help of an engine - afterwards §. Also, to me it seems critical to what end you are analyzing master games. There are many answers to this question, almost as many as masters. You analyze a Morphy game? Great choice, learn how opening sins (especially underdevelopment) are punished mercylessly....


6

You may be confusing the passive (but thoroughly enjoyable) pastime of playing through a game which has already been annotated (whether by a human or an engine) and the active one of doing the hard work of going through a game and trying to work out what is going on, what the best moves are. There is an excellent YouTube video on the "Hanging Pawns"...


12

Let's look at the position and try to evaluate the situation on the board. This is always a good idea, especially if you're struggling to come up with a concrete plan. r1b2rk1/4n3/p1p1p1p1/1p1pPp1p/1PnN1P2/2NB4/2PP2PP/1RB2RK1 b - - 0 1 HOW TO EVALUATE THIS POSITION? In this position black is a piece down for a pawn, so this in and of itself should be cause ...


1

try Lucas chess. It's free and works in windows and Linux using wine. It has a tutor option that is really visual and also many engines you can select based on your rating level https://lucaschess.pythonanywhere.com/


3

One hundred years ago grandmasters, even the great Capablanca, were given to making sweeping judgments about opening positions without supporting evidence, often condemning moves that have been shown to be quite playable. In fact 5...Bxc3 is now considered a "book" move, though 5...O-O is probably slightly better. And as to 5.d3 making the exchange ...


1

I am not a strong enough player to be sure, but if White takes the rook with 26. Qxd2 then Black has 26...Nxf3+ with a triple attack on White's king, queen, and rook. Hug would have seen this immediately and thus knew the queen was already lost. I'm not sure why Nd3 is the best move but Stockfish agrees.


5

Why play 26. Nd3? Is White avoiding the loss of tempo after (26. Qxd2 Qd8) or (26. Qxd2 Rad8)? No, the idea behind Nd3 is to limit the losses. Black would respond to 26. Qxd2 with Nxf3+ forking the king and queen. [fen "r5k1/1pq2ppb/4p2p/p1N1n3/P3P3/2P2BP1/1B1rQP1P/R3R1K1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qxd2 (1. Nd3 Rxe2 2. Bxe2 Nxd3 3. Bxd3 {and white has ...


22

Did black just play f5 before? Then the right move is exf6 en passant, Bxf6 Rxf6 Rxf6 Qe5+ and win the piece. [FEN "2b2r1r/2k1qpb1/2p1p2p/1p1pP3/pP1P1RB1/P1N5/2P1Q1PP/5RK1 b - - 1 1"] [StartFlipped "0"] [StartPly "3"] 1... f5 2. exf6 Bxf6 3. Rxf6 Rxf6 4. Qe5+


2

What was the best move in this position for white? QxQ is the best move. White is a piece up so the best plan is to try and exchange pieces. Once only the pawns and white's last piece are left the win becomes very easy. QxQ is a great way to start implementing that plan. Could white have won this game? White has more than enough material to deliver ...


0

Yes, white can win this game. All you have to do is exchanging the pieces. Think like that; For example, you have 1000 soldier and the opponent have 950 soldiers. You do not know that you are going to win this war or not. Think about 51 to 1. You definitely win the war. When you are piece up, the main strategy is exchanging the pieces as much as you can. If ...


8

Look at the engine line! After your move, black voluntarily exchanges knights and plays ...f6, trapping your dark squared bishop. Now, white is still completely winning since you're up so much material and I don't see a direct way for black to try and win the bishop, but you're allowing black unnecessary ideas. Instead, the suggested best line to play f4 ...


8

Strategy aside, Nxc4 also simply wins another (center!) pawn, while developing the light squared bishop to a nice square (assisting to continue to attack Black's kingside). On top of limiting Black's options for counterplay, as the other two answers correctly state.


4

e4 is still winning but not necessary because you are giving away the f4 square to Black's knight, which gives them some counterplay. There is no good reason to give f4 to your opponent.


1

I think there is no simple answer to this question and you will develop understanding day by day. In chess basically, the bishop is more valuable than the knight in an open position. When the black exchange the bishop with the knight, it would be a bad exchange. Furthermore, you can not take the e4 pawn. Example variant is 5 .. Bxc3 6.dxc3 Nxe4 7. Re1 d5 8. ...


13

Despite the difference in evaluation, e4 is not really a mistake. White is a rook ahead and will win this game anyway, provided that they don't blunder. Perhaps Nxc4 leads to a victory a few moves faster, almost within the engine's search horizon; that's probably why the engine prefers it over e4. However, even humans should prefer Nxc4. If you're this far ...


3

This might not answer your question as it already has some good ones. But just out of curiosity, I ran your game with two separate Stockfish engines, running at their full capacity. I wanted to see how the game would continue, assuming the players give their optimal moves. (The word optimal may not be the best choice in this context. Please take it with a ...


1

To add to the other answers, Black's pieces are more active on the board than White's. They control more squares and offer more options. White's rooks are a bit cramped. Although I'm not certain about it, I believe Stockfish takes this into account in its evaluation.


0

I question whether white is actually ahead on material. The numbers representing the "values" of the pieces are just approximations based on the relative strengths of the pieces, and cannot possibly apply in all cases. For example, winning two minor pieces for a rook and a pawn is usually considered a material advantage, despite both trades ...


6

2 pieces for the rook is often better. In this position, black has a better position with more good squares for his pieces, and a clearer long term plan (attack kingside with good knights). The e5 square is a great square for the knight. The other knight can go Nh5-f4. The b2 pawn is weak and in the eye of the black bishop, which makes it harder for white to ...


9

Interestingly, even without looking ahead and just evaluating the immediate position, Stockfish thinks Black is ahead by nearly half a pawn despite agreeing that White is ahead in raw material. Looking at the sub-scores, the "Imbalance" category is where most of Black's score is coming from. "Imbalance" looks at which pieces are on the ...


22

Black would like to continue their development with Nf6 and castling short. g4 discourages Nf6; after g5, the knight is forced back. It also prepares Bg2, which protects d5 without giving up the pin on the e-file. The weakening of the kingside apparently isn't too much of a problem; Black isn't developed enough to take advantage of this, and White can always ...


6

Bf8, while a nice positional move, an excellent idea for a 1200 rated player, is a mistake as Nxe4 wins an important central pawn for no compensation. The Queen can't recapture due to the coming skewer down the long diagonal. See the lines below. Remember tactics always trump strategy! [White ""] [Black ""] [FEN "1k1rr3/1bpqbp2/...


1

Self-pinning your own pieces is never advisable. You want to retain the rook's ability to move, which it can do after Kh1. Also there's the potential for a double attack against the pinned rook in the Rf2 line after Black castles, even taking into consideration that White is threatening the d6 bishop with the knight. That would still be a loss of the ...


3

I suspect you are looking for OpeningTree


11

At first glance, before concrete calculation: 1 Kh1 looks reasonably safe, the king is out of harms way for good. 1 Rf2 self-pins the rook and disjoints White's whole army with no obvious upside. Why play it over 1 Kh1? Looking a bit further, Black's queen is almost out of escape squares. However, the Rf1 is the only piece that can reasonably seal the trap ...


8

I think I need to first clear up a misconception you have: Forcing a mate with only one rook is impossible so white has no choice BUT to promote to a queen. I eventually took his pawn. The best case scenario is a draw for him now. This is false. A king and rook can, in fact, force checkmate upon a lone king. You should learn the technique ASAP. (It may be ...


11

Very simple. Learn endgames. If you knew much about endgames then you would know that in rook and pawn endgames your rook belongs behind your passed pawn. Knowing that on move 39 you wouldn't have played the pointless Kd5. Instead you would have played 39...a5 with the intention of following this with 40...a4 41...Ra5 and then just keep pushing the a pawn. ...


0

Nh4 is a blunder since after 14..., Bxe2 to save the bishop (the bishop could also retreat to f7 or e8 to save itself), 15. Qxe2, the pawn fork 15..., g5 will win a piece for Black (this fork could also be made after the bishop retreated, again winning a piece), whereas 14. Nxd4 (discovering an attack on the bishop) will win a pawn for White after 14..., ...


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