New answers tagged

0

memorize? no!! intuitively understand and execute without thinking then yes.


6

I think it is a sign of greater awareness of certain patterns and positions. So my answer is Yes, I do think it is a sign of improvement. I doubt that there is anything wrong with going back through an old chess book, even if you remember everything -- rather I think it is good; it is something that I have done quite often as well. It will certainly ...


0

I think that's a best case, not having to think about a combination, but 'knowing' it. It's not a sign of improvement, but it's a definite plank in the platform.


0

Based on your description of your problem you need to study tactics a lot more. Also master ONE opening for white and black and if KG causes you problems then play sicilian or e6 or d6 instead of pe5


1

I wouldn't recommend a gambit unless you are really dedicated to learning the lines, otherwise, any person, with at least some knowledge, will deconstruct you very easily. I recommend the Queen's Gambit for white. Technically it's not a Gambit, however, it's still played very much at the GM level, and even at the low-level tiers, it's very powerful, as there ...


1

Many answers have already shown good examples, but I'd say that if you're looking for a sharp opening, you don't necessarily have to look for a gambit. In many occasions your opponent could refuse the gambit, or maybe give back the material and get a quieter position. For example, as Black, you'll probably reach sharper positions by playing the Dragon ...


5

Two sound gambits for Black: The Marshall Attack in the Spanish: [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4 14. g3 Qh3 This is the main line. Be aware that you need to know lots of theory to play this opening, as most lines are analysed ...


8

The Evans Gambit is probably one of the most sound. It's still occasionally played at GM level and most of the critical lines are rarely if ever tested. The Vienna Gambit and Blackmar–Diemer are probably playable. The Scotch gambit is playable although I wouldn't be surprised if there isn't a forced draw. With black the Benko is probably sound and the ...


-6

You can have 'gambit', you can have 'sound', but you can't have both.... the Benko is the closest you're going to get. Take heart in the fact that gambits are perfectly OK in practice, if unsound in theory.


2

First, nearly all problems are going to be solved by forcing moves (checks, captures, threats) on the first move. Occasionally, you run across more subtle problems where the first move is a quiet move but those are often zugzwangs and they aren't that common. Second, It's good to look at the weaknesses in the position especially hanging pieces ie "that ...


9

for example this one below,don't even know where to begin.Earlier the way I solved problems was finding all the checks,captures and threats and the solution used to come within few seconds but now things are not that easy "Finding all the checks,captures and threats" looks like a great way to solve the puzzle you've posted. There are no immediate ...


2

Your approach won't change, but you see how the depth of the analysis does. Keep it up; your instinct for the things to examine first improve, eventually.


0

You're too old to earn a title, but you've got time enough to learn to appreciate and understand a masterly game. That's the best reason for chess improvement.


0

You may be too old to become a Grandmaster, but one is never too old to learn anything. And in the scheme of things, you're a veritable youngster. Play regularly, do a basic amount of study from a chess manual to have a general understanding of the game, and analyze your games to find your mistakes. Just keep playing regularly and you'll improve in the ...


2

The human brain finds it much easier to recognise patterns that have a name. This is how everyone from Casino card counters to professional Memory competitors develop their skills - they use mnemonics. It's the same in Chess. Rather than thinking "Hmm, the position this Knight is in seems advantageous in some familiar way", you train yourself to ...


2

Puzzles are great practice, but one issue with them is that they drop you directly into a position where a tactic is available. That is, you're given a position and asked to find the best move knowing that it will involve some trick to win material or deliver checkmate. In a real game, tactical opportunities show up rarely, and very often the best move (if ...


2

Consider the possibility that you might not be seeing tactics because there might not be any tactics available to see. Just because your opponent has an exposed king or a pinned piece doesn't necessarily mean that there's any way to attack the king or to exploit the pin. You should still definitely check to see whether there are any tactics available in ...


3

You aren't developing pattern recognition because you aren't seeing the same patterns over and over.


12

Developing tactical ability is a long process. At first you expose yourself to new patterns, try to understand how they work when they are already on the board. You will still not spot it every time it appears in your games. But sometimes you will. And sometimes you will see that you or your opponent cannot play a move because it fails due to a tactical ...


6

I think if you a looking for puzzle solutions in-game you are going to have a lot of difficulty off the cuff. I find that because puzzles just drop you in a position, you aren't put in with context, or your own bias (eg; your development ideas). The above being said, I find that when i look at puzzles they comprise of 4 key materials which are extremely ...


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