New answers tagged

0

Wildhagen's series of books is easy to read without a board, albeit there is no text. The name of the series is Weltgeschichte Des Schachs, and while it is typically biographical game collections (with volumes for Tal, Spassky, Lasker, Capablanca, et al.) there are some volumes centered on multiple players. If you're wanting to read specific lessons, they're ...


1

I think the book "100 endgames you must know" by GM Jesus de la Villa (sample pages) comes close to what you describe. The book is much more than just "facts", but it tries to summarize each of the titular 100 endgames with a short sentence which describe the situation. The second part, of what must be done, will be left for you to ...


7

"Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual" is exactly one such book that contains a lot of these short facts. You can treat it similarly to an encyclopedia in that regard. Throughout, he writes these key tidbits of advice in italics like so: I will caution you though that the actual meat of this book is incredibly involved and is most appropriate for players &...


0

Positive thinking is important. Learning to take a step back is good. But we can prepare for it too. And not in the "omg what if the worst happens" sort of way. Even looking through my best games, I see where I made mistakes that could've given my opponent the initiative. It sort of ruins them. Even in good games where I did pretty well and beat a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included