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6

Just for the record, the longest win in this endgame is 7 moves: [FEN "8/8/8/8/p7/8/N7/k1K5 w - - 0 1"] 1. Nb4 a3 2. Nc2+ Ka2 3. Nd4 Ka1 4. Kc2 Ka2 5. Ne2 Ka1 6. Nc1 a2 7. Nb3# The idea in this position (and other similar positions) is to stalemate the king in the corner; that forces a pawn move and when the pawn reaches a2, you'll need to have ...


9

In the general case K+N vs K+P is of course a draw - or a win for the pawn if it can promote unhindered. There is however a famous construction were the knight can force a mate against a king stuck in front of its own well-advanced pawn: [fen "8/3N4/8/8/8/p7/k7/2K5 w - - 0 1"] 1.Nc5 Ka1 2.Kc2 Ka2 3.Nd3 Ka1 4.Nc1 a2 5.Nb3# There are many ...


-3

It is not possible for king+knight to force checkmate but a helpmate is possible. Basically the pawn promotes to a bishop, the king moves to the opposite coloured square to the bishop with the bishop next to it and the opposing knight delivers checkmate with the king blocking off the two squares in front of the other king. Like this: [fen "KB6/8/kn6/8/8/...


13

It's going to be hard for any position to be "natural" if the king is out and roaming about, so I presume that you mean that the position must be legal. Also, as far as I understand it, the king may only teleport in a checkmate position, and not while in check, because otherwise it would be nigh impossible to give a mate. Firstly, it is entirely ...


4

The longest known checkmate problem composed by a human is dependent on a few criteria that are generally used by chess composers. Namely, it is a question of whether of not you want the problem to have a unique solution, meaning that there is only one possible solution with Black defending optimal, and if you want the position to be legal or not, meaning ...


0

The minimum needed is Knight and Bishop, though N+N+KvK+P is also possible. Perhaps N+KvK+P will sometimes happen, but the standard minimum is N+B


0

Yes, it clearly is possible. Here is a position where White has just castled, and checkmated. 8/8/8/8/8/8/R7/2KR2k1 w - - 0 1


3

Some general advice about kings cut off on the 7th(or2nd) rank in rook endgames. Involve your king or get your N to f3. 1.Kg1 Nf5!? {going after the f3 pawn.} 2.Rxc5 Nd4 (2...Kg6 also comes into consideration but is not tricky enough. although it is my personal fave) 3.Kf1! (3.Ne5?? Rxe5! -+) Rh2= Involve a pawn! 1.Kg1 h5! {in order to get a pawn to h3 or ...


0

Looks like a win for white after Rxc5. Unless White blunders, Black has no mate. Look for white to queen a pawn before black can do anything.


1

If you have a PGN file of those position you could use my site for that. There are already a couple of people using the site not to study openings but have uploaded PGNs of endgame positions to train. If your PGN software specifies a starting position not inside of a "FEN" header let me know: https://github.com/ArneVogel/listudy/issues/2


4

See my book Fairy chess endings on an n x n chessboard (2017), chapter "Endings without the white king", p. 592 Especially: two knights and bishop against bare king, see p. 685. The ending is won only on a 7x7 chessboard, on boards 8x8 and greater the ending is drawn. three knights against bare king, see p. 706. The ending is drawn on a board of ...


1

Non-royal king is a combination of [0,1] leaper (wazir) and [1,1] leaper (fers) and in fairy chess called a erlking. About erlking, see my book Fairy chess endings on an n x n chessboard (2017), page 545. The ending of king + erlking against bare king on board 8x8 is won for the stronger side and the longest win has 18 moves. Also the ending of two erlkings ...


4

Let me count the reasons.... It all depends! And there is no way to answer your question exactly. GMs do not play by your arbitrary evaluation method. They play to win or possibly to not lose. While their tactics are usually very good , missing a mate in 5 while winning the game is more important to them. Depending on how they feel, how much clock time ...


8

Assuming you are Black, you have checked your opponent - your Queen on d1 is putting his King on g1 in check (and checkmate). Edit: assuming Rewan Demontay's reading of your question is correct, then there's no stipulation that you have to check your opponent before checkmate. You can see this in well-known short checkmates, e.g. Scholar's mate. 1. e4 e5 2. ...


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