New answers tagged

0

Yes. If the computer has two moves that evaluate equally it has to make a random choice which one to use. And if the depth is low or other factors keep it from making the best move then the first to make a mistake will likely lose. In the end it is the next to last mistake that actually loses a game. Clearly a computer PROGRAM can beat the same PROGRAM ...


0

I call it silly. I do not want a computer I beat helping me. It gives the human no advantage at all. I would want the computer I cannot beat helping me against yet another computer.


7

Obviously, as long as they are permitted within the rules of the organization, here is how I would use a computer. First, realize that different programs are better at different things, and I will divide them into two categories. I heard GMs Peter Svidler and Jan Gustafsson discuss this during the Firouzja-Carlsen game just yesterday. The first program is ...


4

This is by no means complete, but here's a few things. Use at least 2 engines. More different is generally better. Lc0 and SF would be an obvious pair. Especially with leela, look at the point of view of the engine. Dig into disagreements. Realize most of your games will be draws Make sure you have tuned your engines for long time control. For leela, that ...


2

Tablebases add only a little elo to computers. The amount added is small enough that for many years Andscacs was one of the strongest engines around without endgame tablebases (it still doesn't have them implemented). Even for other engines with tablebase support implemented I'm pretty sure you can not provide it with an endgame tablebase, and they'll play ...


5

Since you didn't specify some things, I'm just going to give instructions from scratch. Since you didn't specify which version of lc0 you downloaded, make sure that it's 23.2 (from https://github.com/LeelaChessZero/lc0/releases). If you only have a cpu you want https://github.com/LeelaChessZero/lc0/releases/download/v0.23.2/lc0-v0.23.2-windows-cpu-dnnl.zip. ...


-1

Leela chess zero engine aka LC0 is a neural net aka NN based attempt to learn to play chess. Arena is a graphical interface aka GUI to interact with it. Why doesnt it do better against Stockfish? Add a 30 move opening book and a similar one for endgames and then train the NNs better longer and you will do better against Stockfish. LC0 is self ...


0

Statistically , based on comments from my stat prof at the uni, I would say it would take at least 5 games but in practice that might easily be ten or 100 depending on many exogenous factors.


2

Your approach is correct. Stockfish does it as well. https://github.com/official-stockfish/Stockfish/blob/master/src/search.cpp if (rootMoves.empty()) { rootMoves.emplace_back(MOVE_NONE); sync_cout << "info depth 0 score " << UCI::value(rootPos.checkers() ? -VALUE_MATE : VALUE_DRAW) << sync_endl; } There ...


3

In alpha/beta pruning, you only prune when further search cannot affect the outcome. In particular this means there will be no loss of information when you transition from MinMax to alpha/beta. There is only upside to alpha/beta (in contrast to other, more aggressive pruning methods). The fundamental idea of alpha/beta pruning is that once you discover a ...


3

You could try PGN ChessBook Which is a free app that can be installed from SourceForge or from the Windows app store. It finds blunders, then automatically annotates games by inserting variations and adding comments to the blunder moves, as described on Automatic game annotation features Of course ChessBase and several other paid apps can also do this, ...


3

I will have to take them at their word that just setting those settings will fix your problem, but here is how you do that. In the URL bar, type "about:config" (without the quotes) and hit enter. Click "Accept the Risk and Continue" (this is just because your local computer does not have an SSL certificate from an accepted authority) You will get a warning "...


4

Those appear to be options to set in your Web browser, which is effectively the platform that LiChess runs on. You don't mention which browser you're using… Chrome uses multiple cores and thereby searches many more nodes per second, without any special attention. On my Mac, Firefox uses only one core, even after entering the settings you mention (using ...


2

Sorry for the late answer, but here’s “my” suggestion of a total mobility 215 in a legal configuration. White has 216 total moves, minus away one for Black’s only legal move for total. [FEN "1Q5R/4Q1K1/B1Q5/B4Q2/N2Q4/pQ4Q1/pn2Q3/krQ4R w - - 0 1"] This position was originally created by William Shinkman as the record for the most mates in two. This position’...


0

No. If that were possible then KN could stalemate the lone King by force (WTM 1 Nb5, 2 Na7, 3 Nc6; BTM Kb7 2 Kc6 Ka8 3 Kb5! Ka7 4 Ka5 etc.), and I already checked (as reported in this answer) that stalemate cannot be forced in general.


0

You're looking at this the wrong way. As you say yourself: the tactical superiority of the computer always gets in the way and I end up losing or drawing the game. Thus, it's really not a matter of opening choice: the computer is better tactically. The best hope you have of beating this computer is getting better tactically. Chess is a game of tactics, ...


1

If you follow engine tournaments, you'll find that although computers are very strong, there are still times when they do the most stupid of things. Here's an example from the most recent TCEC superfinal between Stockfish and AllieStein. [FEN "2b1r3/6r1/p2p1k1p/Pp1PpP1P/1Pp2pP1/2P2P2/1K2R1B1/3R4 w - - 23 149"] [White "Stockfish"] [Black "AllieStein"] Try ...


1

Even if you want to beat a computer, if it out-rates you by a lot, expect to lose a lot more than you win. If it out-rates you by enough, you still might not win at all. While you definitely want closed positions, I do not know that the King's Indian will do that enough since there are too many ways to open the position up. My main suggestion is to study ...


1

Computers have a few advantages over us: speed, memory, and they don't make mistakes (based off the code they're written on). This allows them to go very far ahead in the search tree, navigating the tree perfectly. However, with an engine you estimate to be around 2200, you may have advantages in position evaluation and intuition. With this in mind, there ...


0

The other answers cover this question well, but it is interesting that not all programs do not understand this is a draw. I plugged this into my computer, and as a ChessBase Premium member, I also have access to cloud engines. One of those cloud engines evaluated this as a draw almost instantaneously. I only wish there were more information than simply "New ...


4

A few things: 1) Ratings overall tend to rise due to inflation of more players entering the pool, rather than the average playing strength of players increasing. If everyone becomes better by some factor due to engines, why would top players' ratings increase? They're now playing opponents who have also gotten stronger by roughly the same amount. 2) ...


16

The question is apparently based on a misunderstanding of how ELO ratings work. There is absolutely no mechanism by which the overall increase in players' strength would lead to increase in their ELO. The actual value of the ELO rating bears no meaning; nor does the comparison of ELO at distant times. The only thing that has direct relevance is the ...


24

I think they certainly have increased their ELO, but more importantly, their overall chess strength. ELO is only a rating relative to others in the pool so it may tend to go up more slowly if everyone in the pool gets better, which they have collectively. First, you need to take an average of the top players, rather than look at just two incredibly special ...


2

https://lichess.org/team/lichess-bots has the documentation you are looking for. If you just want the gui you can embed it like in the project used by http://lichess.bitplan.com. If you want to do moves it depends on the programming language you are using. For python e.g. there are ready to use libraries: https://github.com/rhgrant10/berserk https://github....


9

If those engines have a 3600 Elo, shouldn't top players have profited from it to leave Kasparov's 2851 score in 1999 far away? No. The main effect of engines and also the internet has been to democratise chess. The top players have always had access to top level evaluation and knowledge. For lower level players that kind of knowledge, analysis, position ...


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