New answers tagged

5

It's pretty simple: your opponent times out, so he doesn't get an opportunity to play on (so, no chance to mate you). If you have any chance of mating him (on the board, given you have not run out of time), you'd be given the win. But because you don't have any chance of mating him - as you have "insufficient material"* - you don't get to win ...


3

Perpetual check is out of the question (after Ra5+ Be5 the only check is Rxe5+ but that loses quickly) but this endgame has some other drawing techniques: stalemate and exchanging rooks. However, according to endgame databases Black is losing (their rook) in 13 moves and will be mated shortly after. It is very reminiscent of the Philidor position, especially ...


5

Not only is there no "9 move sequence to force a draw" in Crazyhouse, but it is quite possible - rather likely in fact - that a draw cannot be forced in Crazyhouse in any number of moves, because Crazyhouse is a win for White. The first thing to note about Crazyhouse is that it is a more, not less, complex game than chess in the sense of having a ...


2

Can Black draw by perpetual checks? Only if white blunders, doesn't see Kf6 and instead plays Kh4. Yes, Kf6 allows black to capture the bishop on h8 but that leads to a swift mate. Blacks best try is to keep taking pawns and checking but eventually he has to exchange queens to avoid mate and White still has one pawn left plus the extra piece to give him the ...


8

Let's start by debunking some of the false assumptions in your post. Draw offer in worse position The idea that this could be regarded as an "unreasonable draw offer" is nonsensical. Even when there is a material imbalance, which position is worse is often a subjective matter. Certainly at the level of expertise of the average arbiter you don't ...


10

As I understand chess rules insufficient material means K vs. K, K vs. KB, or K vs. KN.(Correct me if I am wrong) Your understanding is wrong. the FIDE Laws of Chess have no "insufficient material" rule. What they do have is basically a "no helpmate" rule. Such a position is called a "dead position". That is to say that if ...


2

KB vs KB when both bishops are of the same color it is automatically declared draw by insufficient material. The same with KBB vs KBBB (theoretically possible), as long as all bishops move on OR white squares OR all of them on black squares. If just one bishop moves on a different color, someone can still win.


Top 50 recent answers are included