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0

Bad question. You have no attack, especially on the king. Castle 0-0 and get on with the game positionally. There is not enough material to do any attacking especially the king. Castle long and White will have the attacking chances such as they are. You are a pawn up but with bishops of opposite colors. This will be hard to win no matter what you do.


0

Every move has plusses and minuses. Fischer does not want to be tied down defending the pawn which would tie up his pieces. c4 attacks the horsie, and blocks whites bishop making it less good now. it allows for black to attack on b2 by moving his rook. it also opens up c5 for the horsie to use at some point. it attacks b3 so white will have trouble ...


6

Every move has pros and cons. Move a pawn, for example, and you gain space, and control squares; but you also weaken squares. The trick is to accurately determine if you will be able to use your pros better than your opponent can use your new-found weaknesses against you. Always remember that a “weakness” is only a weakness if your opponent can get at it, ...


3

As soon as you change the chessboard in chess, you have to re-assess the relative value of the pieces, as a piece's value is directly affected by its mobility and scope. Note that this is already the case in game on the conventional 8-by-8 boards since how much activity our pieces can benefit from depends on how much space we control, which itself depends on ...


2

I'd question whether its "advantageous" to castle on the same side as your opponent. Often it's safer, but that's not always the case and even so "safer" does not mean "advantageous." Remember, when you castle on the same side as your opponent, that means they've also castled on the same side as you; it can't be "advantageous" for both of you at the same ...


1

Let's ignore the whole "fight" aspect for now and consider why we castle in the first place. The key advantage of castling is that you 1) bring your rook to the center, and (more importantly) 2) get your king to safety. Exceptions apply of course, but usually, you're looking to castle on the side where the opponent isn't going to attack. The other thing to ...


3

You may have been in a fight or not. Top players do not fight that way they make the moves best for their position. Sometimes they delay castling but not to fight the opponent. This seems to be a tactic used by weaker players who might want to mount an attack on the other king. The position should decide whether that is the best strategy or not. Not ...


1

Learn Basic Tactics When playing against other beginners, basic chess tactics are very effective — and a lot of fun. If you don’t know about discovered attacks, pins, skewers, and forks, learn about them. Winning Chess Tactics by Seirawan is a great resource. Attack the King Focus on attacking the king when you can. Beginners’ defenses are weak enough ...


3

Start reading some books for beginners such as those by Seirawan. The idea is simply that the author will often explain the rationale behind a move in the book, and just by reading those you will be exposed to tactical and strategic motifs that you will see occurring in your own games. Also, reserve a little time during your study hours for solving puzzles....


3

This answer is a little indirect but it helped my wife get a better grasp of chess and now no longer sees any board state as just a bunch of useless moves. If you have someone you play with regularly ask them to give you a handicap by verbalizing what they are thinking on their move. -ex: "I can move my pawn up two getting control of the center, putting ...


4

Study more and play less. Learn about pawn structure. Play over GM games to see what they do. Some common ideas may occur to you to try. Look for weaknesses you can attack. Look for your weaknesses you could defend better. Can you attack the king? Can you expand for space? Can you put pieces on squares with more mobility closer to the enemy? Can ...


6

Note: everything I'm saying is assuming you're playing white. Everything is also true for black, you just have to reverse the rank numbers. I'm also using algebraic notation; if you're unfamiliar there are a lot of resources. In the opening, your goal should be to control the center with pawns (if your opponent lets you, play d4 and e4 as your first moves), ...


11

Advice I give to complete beginners is to place your pieces so that they point at your opponents king. Ignore any pieces and pawns between your pieces and the King. When playing against another beginner who has no plan this is a good strategy. This strategy has the benefit of helping learn about the power pieces exert across the board even when seemingly ...


8

The tip I learned from Jeremy Silman's "Reassess your chess" series was that, if you can't find a weakness in the opponent's position, you should actively be trying to create a weakness. For example, in closed positions it happens pretty often that all your pieces are developed and in "good" positions, but you still have no attack. When this happens, you ...


5

The strategy is a very deep concept which requires creativity and understanding. It is important to understand the mechanics of certain types of positions and this can be achieved by looking at different varieties of top grandmaster games especially ones where the players have a different type of style. Sometimes even then you have to look at the tiny ...


11

The general rule of thumb is improve the worst placed piece. I would be reluctant to move pawns without any purpose because you are likely to create a weakness. I would rather make a do nothing move, it is often could be a rook move on a back rank, as long as it really don't do anything; this move you can always "undo" (unlike the pawn moves!). Wrong plan ...


15

Some typical things to look out for in the middle game in order to develop a plan... This assumes that it is a relatively quiet position without any imminent tactics that need to be taken care of first. Are all my pieces developed and on active squares (if not, how can piece activity be improved?) Does my oppenent have any weak pawns (typically isolated ...


35

This is very hard to answer since the question is very broad, but in the opening, always ask yourself "what piece haven't I moved out yet?" If you move pieces twice or three times in the opening, and I am developing each one after only one move, soon you will be fighting with only two or three pieces against me with 5 or 6. You will not win that way. Other ...


3

In addition to the other answers, I want to point out that closing your Bishop's activity isn't important here: Your bishop isn't active. Sure it's got an open diagonal, but it's not generating any threats. In the first position, you could play Bxf3 but then White would just recapture with the Queen and you've not achieved anything. In the second position, ...


-5

There are multiple ways in which d5 could be useful here. The obvious answer is because it grabs grip on the e4 square. It also prepares the advance of the c pawn to c4 which will lock down white's LightSquared bishop. If you aren't comfortable keeping your bishop like this for portions of the middlegame then you can play h6 to force the knight back and ...


8

Other than controlling the e4-square (as noted by PhishMaster), there are some additional reasons ...d5 could be useful, which I'll list below. But even if these reasons didn't exist, ...d5 would still be best since controlling e4 is necessary. 1) It gives Black's queen more space. 2) It controls the c4-square, potentially stopping White from playing Nc4 (...


11

You do not have enough control of e4, and if white gets to play e4-e5 here, your king is a goner. It is an absolute must here to stop that plan, and the only way to do it is d5. Making your Bb7 bad for now pales in comparison to letting your king get mated, or loss of significant material, which will happen after e4-e5.


4

This is a very complex question. First, by nature of moving first, white can clearly control whether the game is open, or not, more than black can, but black does have a say next. If white plays, 1. d4, 1. c4, 1. Nf3, or even moves like b3 or g3, we know that the game tends to be more closed than after 1.e4. After 1. d4, for example, black can attempt to ...


4

In general White has more freedom of choice due to going first. He can play a move that is slightly suboptimal and still be around equal. But if Black does the same thing, he could quickly find himself in a bad position. However, it's obviously not always necessary to play dubious moves in order to get the kind of position you want. In general you should ...


2

The Sicilian defense is a very strong opening that gives very complicated and rich positions. Before I talk about the drawbacks and the advantages I want to point out that if by attack you mean attack on your king then I must say that you should never castle queenside when playing the Sicilian defense. However, I think that you mean that white exerts ...


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