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2

Not only is there no "9 move sequence to force a draw" in Crazyhouse, but it is quite possible - rather likely in fact - that a draw cannot be forced in Crazyhouse in any number of moves, because Crazyhouse is a win for White. The first thing to note about Crazyhouse is that it is a more, not less, complex game than chess in the sense of having a ...


2

According to the Syzygy tablebase, the position is likelier to be winning for the queen than for the minor pieces. in KQ v KBBN, 48.9% of positions are wins for KQ, a further 2.3% are frustrated wins for KQ, 26.2% are dsrawn, and 22.6% are wins for BBN. (Frustrated wins are positions which are theoretically won, but in practice drawn because the defending ...


2

..e5 and ..c5 can both be strong moves if followed up consistently. Usually one of them is necessary to avoid a cramped position. In the given position Black has already played both ..e6 and .. c6, pretty much guaranteeing a lost tempo. Also it is not yet clear that the Black Queen belongs on c7. In a Kings Indian formation Black hopes for one of six ...


1

There's a myth in these Kings Indian type positions that Black wants a pawn on e5. Actually, that's not the case; Black wants to keep the long diagonal open for their bishop if possible, and having a pawn on e5 and then making a kingside pawn storm is just the choice they are forced into when they have to give up too much to keep the diagonal open. If you ...


2

Since the first part of your question was already answered, I'll tell you why Bh2 is may be considered "useful". Notice that white's c and e pawns have a strong hold on the d5 square, rendering a d6-d5 pawn push from black impossible. This in turn makes the d6 black pawn a backwards pawn (not protected by any other pawns) and notice that the Bh2 ...


5

Be3 is rather passive. It defends f2 and d4 but otherwise doesn't do a lot. Bf4 is much more aggressive. It eyes up the black queen on c7 and pins the d5 pawn threatening an embarrassing c5. Black's response of putting the knight on the rim and pushing the e5 pawn is pretty much forced. Getting the pawn to e5 has taken black 2 moves whereas normally in these ...


3

Playing for a wild attack, if it has no positional justification, is a pretty sure way to lose against a strong opponent. But you may not care. You chance of losing was already large; you have just made it larger. Your change of win was tiny, you have just made it not quite so tiny. Your chance of a draw was also small; you just made it a bit smaller. What ...


4

The reason is because in the situation if Qb6 is played then you could lose the knight. But if you move the knight you will lose the game because Qf2# is checkmate. white moves Nb5 then black will play a6 receiving a knight or the game.


6

I will try to give an approach to assessing this position. My aim is not to reach a conclusion but to illustrate a process. It is a typical error to try and assess a position by looking at where the pieces and pawns currently stand, instead of asking where they can go to. OP does somewhat acknowledge this by saying "about the knight, with the current ...


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