New answers tagged

6

I agree that f5 is irrelevant. A weakness is only a weakness if it can be exploited. The main reason that g5 works here is that it can force the N away from f3, and then your N can go to d4 with not only a direct threat of Nxc2, which is VERY inconvenient to defend, and the more decisive threat of Nf3!. These threats are so strong that the computer thinks ...


5

Who cares? Let 1,000 flowers bloom. There are already a bunch of popular variants so arguing from tradition is pointless at best. Does anyone play Chess 960 exclusively? King of the Hill? If they do, then those are valid creations of clearly high interest to them. If not exclusively, then still clearly fun for them. If not quite so, just eventually of ...


12

This answer will focus on chess as it is played, rather than subdomains like composition or engine development. Castling is a move that usually accomplishes at least one of two things: It gets the king to safety. It develops the rook. Or both, in just one move. As castling stands now, it requires one move to reach a position that would otherwise take ...


8

Pros: Tal will rise from the dead in excitement at castling not being allowed. Cons: Fischer will also rise from the dead in excitement. Undecided: Petrosian will have many of his masterpieces, where he castled late as was his style, left to not be worth as much. How does he feel about this? Who knows? In all seriousness, this would make the advantage of ...


13

I have no real preference either way, but I'll point out that Kramnik based his argument on AlphaZero playing against itself. Because of AlphaZero's style, it might not be the case that these no-castling games end up in complicated positions more often. Here're two more games to add using the no-castling rule, played in the TCEC viewer-submitted opening ...


5

As a chess composer myself, it would be extremely upsetting. Over two centuries, give or take, worth of wonderful art would be slammed into dust, now entirely useless somewhat. What's to do with it all now if castling is banned? Banning castling would be like burning down the Library of Alexandria-hudrends of years of work would be lost for many people.


22

It would certainly allow for more attacks due to kings being stuck in the center, but fundamentally changing the game, which in a way dumbs it down, is not good. It would be less complex. I also do not want to think that I spent 40 years of my life studying something only to have it changed. I do not want the rug pulled out from under me like that.


7

My 2 cents - it's a very stupid idea, on a par with Nigel Short's suggestion to change stalemate into a win. There are two very good reasons not to do it: It would completely change opening theory There are already 959 alternatives if you want to have a form of chess which is similar to the standard format but with different start positions which gives a ...


5

Playing ...d5 isn't your typical Pirc idea, although it can be played under the right circumstances. In the diagram, White's d3-bishop and f3-knight are vulnerable to a potential ...e4 push. In addition, your g4-bishop provides some tactical possibilities by pinning the knight. Concretely speaking, everything just works nicely for an immediate challenge in ...


5

In most early-stage Pircs, black is slightly worse, so of course, the computer will prefer any move that equalizes, or in this case, gives you a slight advantage. White is not well-placed in the center due to the pin on the Nf3, and the Bd3 interferes with the Qd1's protection of the center (d4) too. Black can effectively "blow-up" the center here, which ...


1

As mentioned in the other answers, the move 10. Qg7 will lose a tempo. The only advantage that such a move could give is the following: this forces the rook to move and prevents the castle for the remaining of the game. But here, the Queen in h6 already prevents the castle and there is no immediate option to force the Queen to move. To sum up, for 10. Qg7: ...


1

The first thing to do is to look at the characteristics of the position rather than looking for the best move. The more you play the easier this gets. My first reaction is "white's position has its problems": the knight at e2 blocks white's bishop, and white's queen has done a lone ranger job when it would be better on d2; on d2 the queen would be acting ...


5

Yes there are some numbers that can (sort of) represent the value of castling. If you let Stockfish or any other strong engine analyze the starting position, it will generally come to the conclusion that White has roughly a +0.50 advantage. But if you use an opening book (1. Nf3 Nf6 2. Rg1 Ng8 3. Rh1 Nf6 4. Ng1 Ng8 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Rb1 Ng8 7. Ra1 Nf6 8. Nb1 ...


1

I’m surprised that nobody has mentioned the problem after ..b6 of developing Black’s Queen. One point of ..c5 is to give her effective development suares at c7, b6 and a5. 2..b6 takes away two of those options and severely limits Black’s possilities for counterattack.


1

The Ruy Lopez is a very flexible and therefore subtle opening. Black has a wide choice of replies and really has a kind of initiative in that the onus is on White to find a good response to whatever Black does. I take it that this game began with 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Ne7. This is the Cozio Defence. This has never been all that popular, but it has at least ...


8

The main ideas behind d4 serve several purposes. It threatens dxe5 winning material. It opens up your pieces, like the Bc1, in particular. It gains space since the trade on d4 leaves white with a pawn that is more central than black's d6 pawn. And probably most important, and this is typical of many double-king-pawn openings, and that is that it is easier ...


6

Warning: I am only 1800 rated in lichess. I believe one reason for playing 3.d4 is that after the exchange on d4. White has a majority of pawns in the kingside which is one of the reasons to later mount an attack on the kingside. If Black tries to hold on to the square d5 with Nc6(Nd7), White can then play Bb5 putting under attack once again the d5 pawn. ...


4

White has for sure achieved various advantages: The white knight at d4 is well centred Black's pawn at d6 blocks the bishop on f8 from developing Black will probably complete development by putting bishop on e7, knight from b8 to d7 and castling, which is a solid but cramped position for a long time From a practical standpoint white's position is easier to ...


1

I'm definitely far from the best chess player on earth, but from my experience and lessons from coaches, pawns are almost always the best defenders, but not always. Watch for defended pieces, and your opponent trying to remove the defender of those pieces / squares to take advantage of the "hole" that's left behind. If you can piece together the kind of web ...


5

First, I think you are looking for a hard-and-fast rule that does not exist since it really depends on the position. There still can be some guiding factors. In the Karpov game above, which only lasted another 6 moves, it turns out that literally every white piece was an attacker, and was necessary for the attack to succeed, so the original question about ...


5

First, I agree that f6 is both weakening and a waste of time. The real crux of the matter is that in most double-king pawn openings, white tries to play d4 and after the trade e5xd4, he tries to outpost a N on d5, which exerts great pressure on black. If black can play d5, and I do not agree that he has the initiative there after the better d3, he does get ...


4

The moves ...Nge7 and ...f6 slow down Black's development and he will need a few tempi to castle. Meanwhile, White is already castled and is sufficiently developed. This gives you enough incentive to blast open the centre with d4, since Black is ill-equipped to respond effectively. Normally pushing d4 like this without c3 in the Ruy Lopez isn't a good idea. ...


2

I simply do not agree with your computer there. It is probably a bit of the "horizon effect", which is when a computer plays a bad move because it puts the refutation beyond its ability to calculate, or "horizon". White played this opening every passively, and really should be looking to break up black's center so he is not smothered, and b4 does not seem ...


4

f6 is a shockingly bad move which badly weakens black's kingside and does nothing for his development. d4 would take advantage of this and keep the initiative. c3 is a weak move which gives black the time he needs to strike in the now reinforced center and justify his previous bad play. Black can play d5 and suddenly it is black who has the initiative. For ...


0

My very amateur analysis would be that if Nxb4, then c3 Nc6 Qa4 then attacks the Bishop, potentially providing support to the c5 pawn and removing the pin on the f3 Knight, allowing it to attack e5 which is now undefended by Black's Knight due to the newly made pin by the queen.


5

The problem with that move is a number of things. You gave up the bishop pair. His attack on your king is stronger than yours on his king, and you traded off a defender. You have no time to go after his king since yours is threatened with mate on the move. Already with three minors traded, his threats aside, there might not be enough firepower to attack his ...


0

From my (rated around 2200) experience, which might be useful to you... I used to spend little time on studying opening theory and almost exclusively played the Kings Indian Attack for which you need to know virtually nothing. Playing the KID as black also helped. Then at some point I decided to study some proper openings ... 1. e4 was my choice. Since ...


0

There are four categories of chess books. Many books fall into several of these categories of course. Tactics Middlegame strategy Annotated games collections Openings Tactics are the most essential, and give the most bang for the buck. There are plenty to choose from. I like the classic 1001 Winning Chess Sacrifices and Combinations by Fred Reinfeld. ...


1

Steer the game into positions you like. The exchange French is not drawish below master level. White can unbalance the position with c4. Plus, French players hate seeing the exchange as much as you hate seeing the French so there's a psychological advantage too. The Alapin Sicilian leads to similar pawn structures but is extremely sound and very active ...


0

I could give you a meaningless answer with lots of mindless fluff and diagrams that fail to answer what you're actually asking. Or I could give you a very simple answer quoted from the greatest player of all time that gets right to the point: "Concentrate on material gains. Whatever your opponent gives you take, unless you see a good reason not to." ...


0

A first book should give you a very broad understanding. While some books that cover specific areas (like tactics books) might be excellent 2nd or 3rd books, they don't cover the entire game. Other books (like Chernev's) give great examples but don't explain the fundamentals of getting there. That would be like getting a collection of brilliantly solved math ...


1

There's a lot of ways to describe the position (such as closed) but no specific name. How to play in the position- 1) First of all you want to make favorable minor piece exchanges. Generally knights are going to be better in these types of structures especially if they can find advanced outposts. White's g2 bishop is an example of a "bad" bishop and is ...


7

It is, indeed, called a "pawn chain". It does not have any other special designation. There is no single best way to counter any specific pawn chain, as it is much more complex than that. Here is a bit on that. Pawn chains, and where you attack them, is the basis for all opening play. Where the pawns on both sides clash is called a pawn break. Knowing where ...


2

What is it called when your opponent opens with their pawns in a zigzag formation, leaving the front line defended by the back? (Pawn Chain) Erm ... I think you've answered your own question. what is the best way to counter this move? Every pawn chain has a base and a head. The standard way of attacking them is to attack one or the other or both ...


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