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3

Best is 2.Qh8+ Ke7, after which White has a choice: Go for 3.Qh7+ Kf6 4.Qxb7 Kxg5, when White has won a queen for a knight with a completely winning position. Go for 3.Re1+, which is slightly more complicated but leads to a forced mate according to Stockfish: [FEN "4r2Q/pq2k3/1p4p1/2p2nNp/2Pp4/3P4/PP3PPP/R5K1 w - - 0 3"] 3.Re1+ Ne3 4.Qg7+ Kd6 5.Qxb7 Re7 ...


1

White is easily winning in this position. Here is the best continuation according to Stockfish. I would trust Stockfish on this one since it should be pretty easy for a good tatictal player to figure out themselves. [FEN "4r3/pq3k2/1p4p1/2p1Qn1p/2PpN3/3P4/PP3PPP/R5K1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Ng5+ Kf8 2. Qh8+ Ke7 3. Re1+ Kd6 4. Qxe8 Qd7 5. Qxg6+ Kc7 6. Ne6+ Kb8 7. ...


1

Playing for a Draw is against the Laws of Chess (1.4: The objective of each player is to place the opponent’s king ‘under attack’ in such a way that the opponent has no legal move.) And it is the simplest way to lose. If you need a draw, play good chess. The best chess you can play. If you are good in endgames, simplify. If you are good in tactics, make it ...


2

This question is old now, but thought I would chime in on how to find a good coach. You wrote: "But I feel like a lot of coaching sometimes is just random topics with a lack of structure." You do not say what the rating of your coach is, but that lack of structure is a major red flag, and the sign of a not-great coach. Long-time coaches/trainers have ...


1

While the computer says it is still roughly equal, I would MUCH rather play black here. After whatever move white makes, black will play Qf6 and e5 in the next two moves, and then I like the central pawns after Re8 (assuming white tries to hold them up at all, he will have to attack e5) and then f4. Later, black will also have the potential for playing ...


2

Other than the computer evaluation proving that the Q is better, the biggest problem here is that black basically starts out fully developed since his pieces already have amazing scope, and can quickly coordinate his forces, and attack.


1

It is a long-held opinion of the Soviets (now Russians) that when you play for a draw, you are really playing for a loss. You should play normal chess, and trade down when it simplifies the position without degrading it. Of course, the more you simplify, the more you need to understand about the endgame.


3

Ahh, this is the difference between studying openings, and really learning to play chess. Openings are really fundamentally different pawn structures, so what you are asking to learn are opening pawn structures. Here are the books I recommend to players seeking my advice. a. “Complete Chess Strategy” volumes 1,2 and 3 by Ludek Pachman. (This teaches about ...


1

In general, isolated pawns aren't necessarily bad. I've been studying the Alapin sicilian recently (from the black side) and I'm amazed at how much activity white has. I thought it would be very fairly easy to equalize but stockfish keeps coming up with idea after idea. Every time I think I have it beat there's some new crushing line that I missed. i ...


15

Your understanding and judgment about a couple of things is way off. First, you really need to understand that all isolated pawns are not created equal. If it were on an open file, then you need to worry about it becoming a weakness more (frontal attack by rooks, in particular), but here, because after d5 cd; cd it is shielded by the pd6, it is hard for ...


1

It looks like a d5 push is premature. Keep in mind is that you have not completed development. You correctly noted that your bishops are not at terrific squares. Besides, your rooks are also not ready. Castle, develop the dark-squared bishop, position rooks. Only then consider the push.


6

While the push could result in an isolated pawn, it would saddle Black with an isolated pawn as well. Furthermore, this Black pawn would make your own isolated pawn less vulnerable than most isolated pawns. It couldn't be attacked from straight ahead and doesn't provide a nice blockade square for an enemy piece. Furthermore, the Black isolated pawn cramps ...


1

15.g3 followed by 16.f4 wins for White since the e5-bishop is pinned.


0

Careful! He never said it was a bad idea. He said it usually doesn't work in these types of positions. Note how me chooses to play Re8 so he can keep his Bishop with Bh8. This is why it doesn't work; White is unable to get the trade.


-1

It is indeed a forced win for Black, partly due to White's choice to ignore the mate threat. White could respond better with 16.g3, thereby buying time and throwing Black off-guard.


3

Most of the reasons given by NoseKnowsAll are correct for this particular position. Put shortly, Black's bishop was a "worse bishop" and the remaining pieces leave White in a disadvantageous endgame. Please take into account that chess decisions cannot be taken based on a fixed set of rules that applies in all situations. If that were the case, we would be ...


6

[FEN ""] 1. d4 c5 2. d5 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 Nf6 6. Bf4 O-O 7. Qd2 Re8 8. Be2 e6 9. Nf3 exd5 10. exd5 a6 11. O-O Bg4 12. h3 Bxf3 13. Bxf3 Qc7 14. a4 Nbd7 15. Rfe1 Bf8 16. Ne4 Nxe4 17. Rxe4 Rxe4 18. Bxe4 Re8 19. Re1 Bg7 20. b3 Be5 21. Bxe5 Rxe5 22. Bf3 Qd8 23. Rxe5 Nxe5 24. Bd1 Qf6 25. f4 Nd7 26. Qe3 Kf8 27. Bg4 Nb6 28. a5 Na8 29. Bc8 Qa1+ 30. Kh2 ...


5

15.g3 looks winning! 16.f4 is coming to win the Bishop on e5.


4

White could play 15. Bf4, covering h2 and attacking the Bishop on e5 which can't move due the pin in the e-file. But the probably stronger continuation is 15. g3 followed by 16. f4, winning the bishop on e5 and winning the game...


18

The best move would have been 16. Rxe5, which entirely eliminates the mate threat, leaving white with a winning advantage. r6r/ppNk1p1p/3p2p1/2p1R3/2P3bq/3Q4/PP3PPP/R1B3K1 b - - 0 16 Here, if black takes the white knight (16. ... Kxc7), 17. Bg5 wins the queen as Qh5 is met with Bd8+.


2

In your example the game was basically played on the kingside only as your "pawn storm" did not get beyond the 5th rank. With or without pawn storm white would not really want to put pieces on the queenside. White made some strange decisions starting with Bh4. Likely a better plan for white would have been to develop pieces quickly (e.g. a knight to e4) and ...


2

You may want to take a look at some games with the English opening (after, for example 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3, where white rushes for a strong queenside attack based on Rb1, b4-b5. The Sicilian Defence (Classical, Closed, Najdorf, Dragon, Taimanov or Scheveningen variations also provide good examples) Some lines on the French Defence also have examples of ...


2

That is a beautiful checkmate, but I personally don't consider a pawnstorm in the opening or early midgame a really good idea, since its easy to penetrate and it loses in terms of development. But if you were to make a queenside pawnstorm, you could probably start with the queens gambit? You can probably push your queen pawns and still end up with a ...


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