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What elo is your father? Its probably easier to simply attempt to win rather than to try and stall losing. Slight advantages in chess can cascade till one side checkmates. A better way of approaching this might be to rephrase the question as "how do I become X elo at chess?" Where X is your fathers strength. Then go though the general advice on ...


1

Most analysis of chess assumes a kind of deterministic model of human gameplay. If you think of gameplay in more probabilistic terms you can see that there are times to play "sub-optimally". For instance, imagine at a given move there is a trap that you know about. If the opponent falls into the trap, this is worth +2 evaluation points for you (ie, ...


6

Father-son relationships can be competitive, especially in areas where the father needs to feel strong (hiding a weakness). Maybe your father used to be very good, and feels the need to revive that time, or he is now, and he can't stand defeat? We don't know your age, but, unfortunately, your father having an unfair advantage of seniority and chess ...


37

There is a tried and tested strategy which works better than all others although it takes some time. That is quite simply to get your opponent to go over the game with you afterwards and point out to you what your mistakes were and, very important, why those moves were mistakes. You obviously also need to pay attention, learn and remember and not repeat ...


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I suppose you meant this one: "By positional play a master tries to prove and exploit true values, whereas by combinations he seeks to refute false values". https://www.quotemaster.org/qd83c54f436b2ade86c4d1e5b217b40a4 Most likely published in Lasker's Chess Manual (which is a great book btw).


6

In a position such as this, where White's army is kind of sitting back and you haven't castled kingside, you might try a pawn storm. For a first step you may play h6 or castle queenside, both of which are moves which are useful for a pawn storm that do not absolutely commit you to it, so you can back off if you don't like White's replies somehow. Here's one ...


6

To paraphrase Garry Kasparov "An attack truly begins when a pawn attacks a piece". It is often very difficult to conduct an attack with just the minor pieces (Knights & Bishops) and your queen. To really get an attack going you need to get your pawns and especially your rooks involved. So in the position you provided, after starting with the ...


6

Other answers have made many good points. But the main reason g3 is a bad move can be reduced to a very simple explanation: The knight on h5 is a very bad piece, it has almost no squares to go to and can easily be threatened to be trapped. The best move in the position is 1.Bd2, this is because compared to other squares for the bishop to move to, it blocks ...


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Pawn structure. Allowing the exchange ...Nxf4 gxf4 simply weakens your structure considerably. The pawns on f2, f4 and h2 are disjointed and cannot protect each other anymore. Black can immediately start attacking f4 with a following ...Bh6, for example, and your only way to defend that pawn is by moving your queen into a pin. Due to the tactical danger ...


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Then only strategically relevant reason, that could reasonably be attached to the concept you presented, is in my opionion, that the subsequent change of the pawn structure is unfavourable for the defender. Reasons would vary wildly with the concrete pawn structure. E.g.: In the maroczy structure white may play Nd5 after preparation and if black captures ...


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