New answers tagged

2 votes

What are variations that can explain why 1.c4 is often suggested as an alternative starting move for for aggressive players?

Your question asks for variations and that suggests to me that you are thinking along the wrong lines. Certainly there are very few, if any, followups to 1.c4 that lead quickly to sharp tactical play, ...
  • 7,538
3 votes
Accepted

What are variations that can explain why 1.c4 is often suggested as an alternative starting move for for aggressive players?

One of the reasons mainline openings are "good" is that they are fundamentally strategically sound. You develop your pieces, fight for central control, secure your King, etc. All the things ...
2 votes

Why does Black get away with giving White so many free tempi in the Sicilian?

A short answer to your question, by Francois Andre Danican- Philidor (better known just as Philidor (7 September 1726 – 31 August 1795)) and possibly the most known quote in chess. The full quote is: &...
  • 611
3 votes
Accepted

Why does Black get away with giving White so many free tempi in the Sicilian?

Here's a quote from GM Yasser Seirawan's book, Winning Chess Brilliancies, on the related position after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6. This extraordinary move is ...
  • 22.6k
4 votes

Why does Black get away with giving White so many free tempi in the Sicilian?

The main counterpoint to your argument is that all the advantages you list are temporary, practice has shown that it is difficult for White to exploit them, and White has made important long-term ...
  • 41
3 votes

Why does Black get away with giving White so many free tempi in the Sicilian?

Chess is hyperconcrete. Black walks in the black sunshine (I probably might even play b5, +0.8) and if he keeps on this way, knights will fly around Blacks ears at b5, d5, f5 or e6. Black won't get ...
3 votes

Why does Black get away with giving White so many free tempi in the Sicilian?

I am not nearly a strong enough player to make any authoratative assessment on the position you provided, and for what it's worth, I agree with your evaluation completely. To me that position looks so ...
  • 5,686
8 votes
Accepted

Definition: What is meant by "bishop pair" in this context?

"Bishop pair" is a chess term indicating you have the pair of bishops - i.e. one bishop covering the light squares and one bishop covering the dark squares. If, after a3, Black plays ...Bxc3 ...
  • 22.6k
5 votes

Why after 1. d4 Nf6, 2. c4 is so common but after 1. c4 Nf6, 2. d4 is so rare?

The first moves 1.d4, 1.c4. and 1.Nf3 can all potentially transpose to the same opening lines, but they can also each avoid specific openings, while also allowing others: 1.d4 gives Black the full ...

Top 50 recent answers are included