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5

There's a 12-page chapter on this position in Cristoph Wisneski's "Play 1...Nc6!: A complete chess opening repertoire for Black." In that book it's reached via 1.e4 Nc6, 2.d4 d5, 3.Nc3 e6. More generally you're probably more likely to see this discussed in books on the Nimzowitsch defense (with d5, not e5) rather than French defense books.


1

White: Exchange Spanish with an early d4 1.d4 King's Indian Exchange Variation Black: Pirc Defence 1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e5 4.dxe5 dxe5 - I actually think this is close to equal for Black. (4.Nf3 is usually played.) Berlin Defence Nimzo-Indian 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 O-O 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.Qxc3 b6 7.Bg5 Bb7 8.f3 h6 9.Bh4 d5 10.e3 Nbd7 11.cxd5 Nxd5 ...


4

There's a "drawing line" in the Petrov Defense for White: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 {Black has to play this or 6. d3 wins a piece} 6. d3 Nf6 7. Qxe7+ Playing 7. Qxe7+ loses White's opening half-tempo, but queens are off, and if that's what White wants he's gotten it. Not playing Qxe7+ can still lead to a queen trade, ...


3

How many opening moves are needed before we can identify that such moves fall into a particular well-known opening such as Ruy Lopez, London, kings gambit, an so on? It depends on the opening. Some are more strictly defined than others; e.g. a game is really only a "Ruy Lopez" if it reached the position after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5, but lots of different ...


5

Openings are typically decided by ECO Codes. So as few as one move and as many as 5-6 or more moves could decide an opening. For example, as soon as you play 1. b3 it is a Nimzo-Larsen attack. (A01) As soon as 1. e4 c5 is played it is a Sicilian defence. (B20) But there are many variations. If the game continues 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6, it becomes ...


2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_openings has what you want. And after such identifying moves, can we we say that such opening is already completed and the player is on his own for the development of his pieces Openings certainly don't "complete" like that. In fact, ECO openings only give you the head start. Whether a player is on his own ...


12

There is a prerequisite to any aspect of playing chess: NEVER EVER IGNORE YOUR OPPONENT AND THEIR INTENTIONS, FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER! This is of course not very surprising, but nobody has ever become even a halfway decent player by not paying any attention to their opponent (as you noted yourself, you dropped two pieces by not paying proper attention to ...


7

Thus, why is the London System considered safe? Every opening where white starts with 1. d4 is considered safe compared to 1. e4 (provided white doesn't do anything silly) because the queen protects d4. d4 openings are inherently safer than e4 openings. Why do proponents say you can utilize it regardless of what your opponent does? No intelligent, ...


0

Although it might not be possible to realise chess in a database in this universe, the abstract structure of the game can be said to exist as a finite mathematical object. One can reason about it and conclude that it has a definite result, although we might not know what that is. And then if you view it as a matrix you can ask questions like what is the ...


7

Yes, in the Sicilian black often falls behind in development, and that is a problem -- white often gets the chance to mount an attack. But black has some compensation. After ...cxd4 Nxd4 he has two central pawns while white only has the e-pawn. In order to attack quickly, white often castles queenside and black can use the half-open c-file to start a ...


1

I've toyed with this idea in the past but never played it seriously. If you're okay with the transpositions there is nothing wrong with it at all. After 1.e4, e6 2. d4, c5 white has three main choices (3. dxc5, Bxc5 is obviously really bad for white) Nf3, cxd4 transposes to an e6 Sicilian. There's nothing wrong with that d5 is a Franco-Benoni. Black ...


17

There's a variety of reasons why openings are commonly named after nations (but most commonly would surprise me), maybe due to an individual player of the nation, e.g. Spanish (Ruy Lopez), English (Staunton), maybe due to a group of players in one nation e.g. Italian, maybe due to an event involving the nation e.g. Scotch (named for a correspondence match ...


11

The Evans Gambit is a running gag on Agadmator's channel. I can't remember when it started but at least for the past year whenever there is a game that reaches the Giuoco Piano position he jokes about white going for the Evans Gambit, a very exciting opening which—to Antonio's dismay it would seem—is played extremely rarely in modern high level chess.


16

The joke is based on the perception of Giri as a very solid, "drawish" player. There always seems to be one top player who is the butt of such jokes. It used to be Leko, nowadays it's Giri. Take a look at this reddit thread for example or this chess24 April's fool. The swashbuckling Evan's is the last opening Giri would ever choose to play, or so the ...


16

I'm discounting the explanation he just made an error in his annotations because of the deliberate way he looks at the camera when he announces this First of all, he did make a mistake. He said Giri played the Evans Gambit but Giri was black. The Evans Gambit is an opening played by white. The opening is sound and is occasionally played at the top ...


4

I guess you mean the game below and at the 7th-move: 7.Qa4+ doesn't win the bishop because black can reply with Nc6 blocking the check and defending the bishop. [title "Biel, Carlsen vs Navara 2018"] [fen ""] [startply "12"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 e6 4.Bg5 Bb4+ 5.Nc3 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.e3 (7.Qa4+ Nc6) O-O 8.Rc1 dxc4 9.Bxc4 c5 10.dxc5 Nd7 11.O-O Nxc5 12....


4

IMO, 3...c5 by itself, is not really a problem, after the strongest continuation 4.d4 stockfish gives 0.5, and after 4th move in the game stockfish gives equality. And I think your reasoning is fine, it is generally good to trade a c-pawn for d-pawn. But it looks like it is a part of bigger problem: You made too many pawn moves 5...h6 And 6...f5, and later ...


2

Naman Kumar asks "Now what am I supposed to do?" if the gambit pawn is declined. Naman, you play the King's Gambit for sharp, tactical games (although I think it was David Bronstein who played it as a positional opening?) so by declining the gambit you already have a small concession by Black. Your play should be to rapidly develop and castle: so ...


7

About the second line, 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d6: This line is known as the King's Gambit, Fischer defense. One thing it isn't is "ignoring your gambit" - Black is stopping you from playing Ne5 after the well-known Black maneuver ...g5-g4 in the King's gambit main lines. The most common line now is 4. d4, when 4...g5 5. h4 g4 forces White to play 6. Ng1 (...


4

After f6 White takes with the bishop and Black loses a piece (bishop on c5 since d6 square is attacked by the white knight and f8 is attacked by the white pawn; no other piece is protecting the bishop).


7

Ivanchuk has played several games in the Scandinavian variation of the Alekhine. You can find the games for example here, if you sort by black Elo.


4

I have every reason to believe your approach is wrong and will lead to disaster. I'm saying it as someone who make softwares to work on Polyglot books (www.smallchess.com). You are strongly advised NOT to do all the hard works like what I did before. Just wrap the C++ Polyglot code in your C#! Your time should be on your C# engine, not this. Polyglot, ...


0

The classical/cordel is a very good choice against the Ruy Lopez. I switched to the sicilian for exactly this reason but this is what I would play if I hadn't .Black avoids the main lines but gets an active position. I think 4...Nf6 is the most natural choice here. Black develops a piece, prepares to castle and attacks the e4 pawn. 4...Bb6 doesn't really ...


0

The line you play is fine. After 5.b5, Bxc5 the position favors black. bxa5 leaves white with a crap pawn structure. a3 just loses a pawn for white White has nothing after 4...a5


0

The answer is it depends. You're actually asking a couple of different questions though. First of all, a narrow vs. a broad rep. Most players are probably better off steering their games into a narrow rep where they limit the opponent's responses and steer the game into positions they know. However, because of engines, I don't believe you can be a ...


2

3...Ne4 is kind of pointless. The idea is to play Nd6 controlling e4 and attacking the c4 pawn. The only other options are Nf6 losing a tempo or f5 in a weird Dutch-like position. White is maintaining an advantage after 3...Nd6 4.e4 though. It avoids theory I guess.


0

Let him play what he wants to play. If it's a mistake show him why. He will develop his own ideas and have a good understanding of a wide range of openings. That's how you create a strong, young player.


1

Black is blocking his bishop. White has a lead in development and the option of c3 at some point. White should be able to maintain an advantage for some time. Black is going to have to spend at least one tempo playing either Ng6 or g6 to free his bishop and castle. The line is probably inferior to playing Bc5 first or Nf6. The line you gave isn't very good....


1

You are overcomplicating your question by misusing a lot of terminology you apparently don't understand. There is no countergambit here nor is there an offer of a pawn nor is the bishop overloaded. This is a very simple position and black has several choices that are equal or near equal: Be7, dxc4, c6, Nbd7 and Bb4+ are perfectly playable. White isn't ...


2

a) can you train your entire repertoire in one swoop? Or are you forced to choose each opening module and train one at a time? you have to choose the opening you want to train. However, you have control of what is included in an "opening" The only constraint is that White and Black must be separate. So you could have a single "white" opening and a ...


6

Since the question is posed very generally, I'll only give a rough overview of some of the more typical ideas behind the Winawer for black. I'll mostly focus on positions after 4.e5 as that is the key line allowing white to fight for an advantage out of the opening. It must be noted that the ideas tend to vary somewhat greatly depending on which specific ...


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