New answers tagged

1

Here's a mini-list of openings (both amateur/professional) I compiled that fit this criteria. Feel free to comment or add your own post if you have suggestions: Advance Caro-Kann Albin Countergambit Black Lion Botvinnik Semi-Slav Exchange French Winawer French Exchange Ruy Lopez Scandinavian Defense, Anderssen Counterattack (Qa5/early e5) Scandinavian ...


1

I found an explanation of this move in Jon Speelman's Modern Defence book (published 2000): So my intuition was correct; 4...Qb6 does seem to be the more accurate move.


5

First and foremost it should be noted that while you can employ the Grand Prix Attack against basically any Sicilian, the Rossolimo/Canal Variations can only be played against 2...Nc6 and 2...d6 Sicilians. If you look at GM games, the Rossolimo will appear more than the Grand Prix Attack due to being more solid (not moving the f pawn so early and following ...


2

I think I found the "refutation" to this setup: [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nc3 d6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. O-O e5 8. d5 Ne7 9. e4 Nd7 10. Ne1 f5 11. Nd3 Nf6 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. f4 I'm no master, but it seems to me like Black's attack has been completely stopped on the kingside because White has managed to blockade ...


4

This is the old, old main line that is usually considered dead equal. I can't believe the 80% winning percentage for black has to do with the objective merits of the position. Note that Lichess' opening explorer does not show the ratings involved in those games, nor the dates. Looking at percentages only can be extremely misleading. I think the following is ...


0

Rizal provides a good move analysis. Positionally, the black knight at c5 is well placed and moving it would decrease its influence. Supporting the knight with b6 keeps the knight on a good square. If white takes the knight, then capturing the bishop with bxc5 keeps the center closed and opens the b file for black. This makes white's typical plan of queen ...


2

After 10. Ng4 then simply 11. Bxc5. You lost a centralized knight but more importantly, after dxc5, white can double on the d file and try to open the centre after rd1 (Back to the original position) 11....Nh5 then white can play 12. a3 (b4 in mind) taking initiative, 12. Bxc6 (rd1 in mind) threatening to open the d file, 12. Qd2 with the same idea or ...


0

lichess.org has also this kind of tool for open profiles. I guess this tool is used or can be used for external chess websites. Probably, someone can find the open-source code of chess-insights tool in lichess-github repo. Read more about chess-insights here


3

OK, so after a bit more research I have concluded that this variation is in fact playable for White, even with perfect play from Black! Here's my analysis: The critical line is [FEN ""] 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 d4 3.Nce2 e5 4.Ng3 Be6 5.Nf3 f6 6.c3 In this position, we're threatening to win a pawn with 7.cxd4 exd4 8.Qa4+ Nc6 9.Bb5. Black has a couple of ways ...


2

The opening 1.Nc3 is much better than people think, and I have had very good results with it, especially if I pick the opponent. The perfect choice is someone strong enough to try and refute it but not strong enough to do so. The line you mention with 4..Be6 is the only line that worries me, but it only appears if Black is either very well informed or else ...


0

Sure - I imagine there are quite a few. Here's one: https://www.365chess.com/ Expand Resources, and click on Board Editor Clear the board, and set up whatever position you want. Make sure you state which side is to move, and whether castling is available still ... Below the board copy the FEN of the position Expand Search, and click on Game position ...


3

Most likely 4...d5 is a little bit better. Why do you want your queen to b6 at all? Usually developing the queen early in the opening is not recommended (for various different reasons) and I think this is no exception. Queen is offsides on b6. It's premature developing, you don't yet know where the queen belongs. After 4...d5 5.e5, the most common moves for ...


3

Just a small addendum: As a Bf4 player who never plays London but his own obscure systems (which are extremely dangerous for both sides - in the days before computer preparation, I clobbered a few GMs with them I only play e3. My own experience is that the most doubly-edged Black plan is pestering b2 with his queen. e3 (developing, also keeping the option ...


3

The number of central pawns is one of the factor that matter in the evaluation of a position, but it's definitely not the only one. While I think both 3.e3 and 3.c3 are playable, 3.e3 helps your development, while 3.c3 does not. If Black takes on d4, White gets an amazing outpost on the e5 square. In fact, Black would wish he could put his e6 pawn on the &...


18

Chess strategy is complex and has several ingredients mingling at the same time. It is true that 3 c3 helps white mantaining two center pawns if black decides for a c:d4 pawn exchange. But black isn't forced to that and the move c3 has some incovenients. To list just two: blocks the c3 square which is the natural place for developing the Q-side knight; ...


5

Move 3 is a bit early for such positional evaluations, but some food for thoughts: after 3...cd 4.ed, e7-e6 will be played, rather sooner than later but then the pawn structure in the center is fixed, which makes it hard for Black to "exploit" his extra central pawn. Any expansion with ...f6 and ...e5 is out of question for at least the next 20 ...


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