New answers tagged

1

This move is bad, however, depending on your opponent it has merit. If your opponent is 2100 and above with an understanding of how to break open a position and kill a king then it won't end well for you. On the other hand, if your intention is to provoke your opponent to attack you and then counter-attack when an opening is created it may well be okay. You ...


0

Since White wants a scholar's mate, I will run over a sample line. e4 e5 2. Qh5??? Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Qb3 Nd4! Simply kick White's queen around while developing.


1

Your main plan is to fianchetto, Ng8-h6-f5 to put pressure on the d4-pawn. Then, you can attempt to blockade it with the other knight, and then to put your rooks on the d-file. Basically, the strategic plan is to pressure White's d-pawn.


0

This gambit is PLAYABLE, but it clearly isn't winning for White. Black clearly has a way to equalise, or to gain a small edge, or else this opening would be played at top level.


3

It's a bad move. Sure it would be surprising, but a surprising move is only effective if it's challenging for your opponent to play against (here that's reversed). The only value would be playing this as a joke in a fun game with a friend or something. Stockfish 11 at depth 31 gives -1.48 after Black pushes 2...e5.


0

The Halloween gambit(dubious) sacrifises a knight for a large centre: 1.e4 e4 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nxe5?! The optimal line is shown here: 4...Nxe5 5.d4 Ng6 6.e5 Ng8 7.Bc4 d5!? 8.Bd5 c6 9.Bc4/9.Bb3. r1bqkbnr/pp3ppp/2p3n1/4P3/2BP4/2N5/PPP2PPP/R1BQK2R b KQkq - 1 9


0

In KOTH, the best opening are classical. Putting pawns in the centre will allow your king to safely march up and also stopping the opponent's king from entering the centre. Gambits which sacrifise a piece for a large centre are good, such as the Halloween Gambit. It wins in KOTH, but is only remotely playable in standard chess.


0

It seems that Black has weakened his light squares and fallen behind in development. I evaluate this position as equal. Black holds onto the extra pawn, but he also weakens his position.


0

First of all, to refute a gambit, we need to analyse all the lines to a [forced] win. For example, the Latvian Gambit will result in all lines ending with a material advantage for White able to guarantee a win. However, for the Muzio Gambit, there is no such proof. Black will eventually have to give a knight back to reduce White's initiative, so there is no ...


0

I have to say, studying the whole 1.e4 repertoire is quite hard, so I suggest that you narrow your options down. I reccommend the King's gambit. For other non-...e5 responses to 1.e4, you could attempt to rip up the position and to make your first-move advantage apparent. For the Sicilian, there is another case. Play the Kopek system(Bishop to d3), which ...


1

Don't trade material - It will make your handicap more apparent as the game continues. Attack. If you can overwhelm your opponent with your pieces, then that is the best way. You can't stand to be passive. Play openings that don't involve the queen much, e.g., The Scotch game clearly doesn't work for White as White loses a pawn with exd4.


0

This is because it gives up White's advantage. Sure, it is playable, but it isn't so good from a White perspective. The Dutch defence for Black, however, has the purpose of creating an imbalance, and so is reasonable. However, I still prefer Bird's opening.


0

Assuming the engine performing the analysis is Stockfish (sounds reasonable, since the engine is presumably running on CPU) then it's probable the move it considers subpar is 4.c3. Left to its own devices Stockfish will occasionally play the Giuoco Piano, but it will usually play the Giuoco Pianissimo - i.e. 4.d3 instead of 4.c3. Indeed, the cloud analysis ...


0

There are also many more openings for positional play, like the London System, Nimzo-Indian, etc. Perhaps the best choices are systems since they require little or no theory.


0

First of all, the Bc5 can be quite annoying as White has weakened himself on the g1-a7 diagonal. White can just play Kf1, d3, and then aim for e2-e4, a thematic move. Then, the best strategy is to use the e and f pawns as a steamroller, with e5, Re1, f5. Black's bishop is not doing anything to protect the queen, and White is virtually up a piece. So just ...


0

Well, playing the KIA, before you can get aggressive, you've got to first consolidate your position, shore up all weak points and place a knight on d2(slows down Black's queenside ambitions), and then only to start playing aggressive by playing ...Ne1, ...f4, ...f5, ...g5, and attempt to overwhelm Black with a kingside attack.


0

Black has two main breaks in the French c7-c5 undermines the d-pawn f7-f6 undermines the e-pawn. Of course, White has advanced the c-pawn, so the pawn that has disappeared is the e-pawn. Black does so to give him an open f-file and a freed position.


0

Attempt to preserve your big center. In the exchange variation, the center can't advance, but if you play the Russian variation, you can advance your centre because there is less pressure on it. However, in this variation, be careful not to overextend your position.


0

If you are certainly not going to play the Grunfeld, then 2...d6 is more flexible. But if you are keeping your choices open, then just play 2...g6


0

The Pirc defence aims to enter a KID setup from the King Pawn's opening. The main line goes e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 Note that White has one more move than in the KID, so the chess game is more fast-paced for White. The main strategy of the Pirc defence is to use pawn breaks to undermine White's centre. Note: The Pirc defence has positions that are ...


0

...Nbd7 is not a good continuation since there is too much theory relating to this line. Besides, it is better for White. The safe line is ...Nfd7, which opens up the diagonal for the Bg7. A common mistake here is White not playing a2-a4, because if not, Black can get his queenside majority into action with ...a6 and ...b5.


0

Here is a main line for White. White aims to have a central majority at the cost of losing the initiative. b4 e5 2. Bb2 Bxb4 5. Bxe5 Nf6 Black's plan is to aim for quick development and an attack, while White's is to ensure a safe position and put his central pawns into use. Black has a small advantage, but must put the attack into action immediately or the ...


1

The easy solution is to learn a system - i.e., London System; King's Indian Defence; etc. Look through a few setups and weigh the pros and cons. Then, pick 2 - one for the d-pawn opening and one for the e-pawn opening. Play around 50 games with this system to get the hang of it. I'll leave you to work the rest out.


2

The best choice is to aim for quick development. Once White has played 8 moves, you would have pushed the d/e/f- pawns forward, developed three pieces, and castled. White is still in the center. Now aim to absolutely wreck White's position with ...f4


0

There are three main agressive options which I play frequently. 1.Benoni Defence 2.Budapest Gambit 3.King's Indian Defence These are good choices for Black, as they create imbalances which result in winning chances.


0

Another good idea is to play the Romford countergambit. The line is below. g4 d5 2. Bg2 Bxg4 3. c4 d4! 4. Bxb7 Nd7 5. Nxa8 Qxa8 6. f3 d3! The main idea is to expose White's king. I recommend this line as a refutation to the Grob.


0

I used to play the Grob some time before because of the tricky 'Grob Gambit' (1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 Bxg4 3. c4), but this only successfully works in blitz chess. In classical chess, the opponent has plenty of time to think. Engines think that the better move in the Grob Gambit is to decline the pawn with 1...c6 and to build a large center. That is my advice as ...


1

Most good players do it to avoid other openings like the sicilian. It is not that bad at all. If White plays well the projected outcome is a score of 49.5% for white. White could do better with Pe4 or other moves but the Bird has a psychological advantage by not playing the usual opening.


2

I think what you are looking for is something like https://chesstempo.com/opening-training/ or https://openings.chessbase.com/ In both cases, you can build opening move trees (either for White or for Black - you train/drill one side per tree) by picking moves for any given position and the site will automatically handle transpositions for you if you reach ...


1

One option would just be to copy their hippo and just copy the setup.


4

[fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 Be7 4. Nc3! {Provoking Black to displace our king} Bh4+ (4...Nf6 {is actually the most critical try, preparing d5} 5. d4 d5 6. exd5 Nxd5 7. Bc4 Be6 (7...Bh4+ 8. g3 fxg3 9. Qe2+ Be6 10. hxg3 Bxg3+ 11. Kd1 {Opening the kingside like this gives White a lot of play as Black will castle there or leave his king in the ...


4

After 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Be7 4.Nf3 Bh4+ probably 5.g3!? fxg3 6.0-0 does the job. [fen ""] 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Be7 4.Nf3 Bh4+ 5.g3!? fxg3 6.O-O In typical King's gambit style, you're down in material and probably a bit worse with perfect play, but you have great compensation and attacking chances. If Black makes a mistake, they will pay ...


1

Bird's opening aims for a potential kingside attack, at the cost of weakening the kingside. It is a reversed Dutch defence. I believe that the best refutation to Bird's opening is not 1...d5, which offers White kingside counterplay. Simply play 1...c5, attempting to transpose into a variation of the sicilian.


3

Control the centre. White, or Black, has wasted a tempo, and you should take advantage of that. Another problem with a/h-pawn openings is that this will leave a weakness on b/g4. Attempt to goad the c/f-pawns forward so that you can place a bishop on g4. The only exception to the Rookside openings is the Andersson opening, Creepy Crawly Formation(a3 and h3)...


0

I've looked at the book 'Dismantling the Sicilian", but it didn't satisfy my need of information. The best I can recommend is not a book. Simply use the analysis board of Chess.com and if you have premium, the opening book. There are also many master games which you can look at to learn about the strategies of this opening.


6

Well, we can trust the engine in some cases when they analyse, but in this case, we are looking at book moves. Since the Italian Game is perfectly reasonable, don't worry about the 0.3% off.


18

Probably, as you pointed out, Bb5 instead of Bc4. The Ruy Lopez is considered very very marginally better/more critical than the Italian by humans, so it'd make sense that the engine used here'd agree. Certainly, however, the Italian is fine, and the difference is very marginal.


2

Perhaps so called theoretical knowledge has no real use. You should ask why your rating/ability has not been improving. At only 120 games you are a total beginner. I presume you meant online games. If those were actual OTB tournament games then you need to switch to checkers. You need to play less and study more effectively. Just playing games will not ...


2

There are plenty openings you could use in blitz, but, i think the slow solid and positional openings need more thinking, thus you could lose. I would suggest playing like Mikhail Tal, make sacrifices without calculating the move too much, and try to complicate the position for your opponent. I have used this in many of my games,i complicate the position, ...


5

5...Bb4+ looks like a weird move because you wouldn't play a move like that often, but it makes perfect sense because the white bishop in on b3. White would definitely want to develop his knight with Nc3 on the next move and put pressure on Black's pawn center. By playing 5...Bb4+ you prevent 6.Nc3 (it'd lose a piece). If White goes for 6.c3, then Black can ...


-2

I think that this would be a mistake. White easily counters with Bd2 or c3. I don't think you would see this move unless the players were lower-rated (think sub-1000).


-3

To prevent castling later on in the game. It limits White's defensive options


2

There are a couple of games between AlphaZero and Stockfish. The authors of the book Game Changer about AlphaZero, GM Matthew Sadler and WIM Natasha Regan, analyse the opening phase of these two games in this YouTube video. Here are the opening moves from the two games, first with AlphaZero playing black and coming up with a new idea, castling queenside and ...


1

You could find that by googling "e4 e5 Nf3 Nc6 Bb5 f5" Here is the first result Anyway the Ruy Lopez (and many other openings) improve your chess overall if you play the strategically rich mainlines, not because there's any magic behind 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 that will make you a better player. The line you suggest is great and will leave you with ...


3

It's definiely not a "bad" option for Black. It can be played at high levels and still get decent results. However, it's not considered a "great" line for many reasons: As you said, White has multiple set-ups to choose from most of them leaving them with a slight advantage. The "surprise factor" that may give Black with an edge ...


5

No source, and I understand you're not asking about this, but I'm writing this anyway because I suspect you'll be interested. I'm told at the highest level (correspondence chess), 1. e4 e6 is at best a draw for Black. In other words, if you play the French defense as Black, you are playing for a draw - actually even worse than that, since you'll be suffering ...


1

The Vienna is one of the better openings below international level. Objectively it's probably equal but that's true of nearly every opening. There's only a few openings that can even try to claim a small advantage nowadays (Ruy, Queen's gambit) What I like about the Vienna: it cuts off a lot of black responses like the Petrov, Philidor, Latvian etc. It's ...


0

@David Chopin As I noted the first time both lines are inferior. h5 would be better. And to @Scounged - the games were played by 2200++ rated players and there were many more games than you say. The results based on data based on GM play speaks for itself. The real question is why play that line at all when 2Nc3 avoids it.


0

I have been playing Pirc, even so I can learn different lines. I even bought some interesting books, one in Spanish "La Defensa Pirc y Fianchetto de Rey" and another in English that I don't remember the name now, but I'll get the name on the website I bought. Pirc can vary from very simple lines to some of great complexity, where both sides can ...


-1

It's great until you reach 2000. After that don't use it as a main repertoire. The main repertoire should be the main lines. Then along the way you can get creative. Knowing why the main lines are in fact the best will greatly improve your play after 2000 Hope this short but sweet answer helps!


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