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1

There is no need for a special book on this, which is why you cannot find one that covers it much. The reason is that it simply transposes to most normal lines, but just avoids the Botvinnik Nge2 line that you are trying to avoid. There is one line that white can try that breaks from standard theory. After 3...Be7, white really has only two main choices: ...


4

This has been one of my main two openings since it became popular in the 1980's again. With strong computers today, they say, and I agree with them, that black is virtually winning after the following line: [fen ""] 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bg5 Qxg5 7.Nc7+ Kd8 8.Nxa8 Nf6 {already -2.05 on Stockfish} 9. Nc3 Nd4! 10. h4 {best per ...


1

I think it is primarily because they are the easiest subject to write about, especially with computers today, and thus, beginners see so many opening books that they believe they should be buying opening books. Frankly, for most players below 2200 (prodigies excepted), I believe that this is the wrong approach totally. There is a difference between studying ...


-1

The accelerated dragon attempts to play d5 in one move while the dragon plays d6 first so a later d5 would lose a tempo by moving the d pawn twice. Given that the dragon often becomes a race as to which side can mate the other first, the extra tempo is a huge advantage. However, playing the accelerated dragon allows white other options not available in ...


1

Lack of kingside development. If you want a queenside fianchetto there are better lines. b6 creates a problem in how to develop the queenside knight. Normally after Nc6, black can recapture with the b pawn but in this line black can't.


1

The ideal pawn center is with pawns on e4 and d4. Yes, a pawn on d5 is more advanced and controls more space but it isn't necessarily better. In fact, you could argue that it's weaker on d5 because it has less control over the center. So, white wastes a move to weaken his pawn structure and is falling behind in development. That's why its not that great of ...


1

According to this source: The ELO of O.W. Rigaud was 1476, having lost 7 out of 7 games.


2

First, I would not trust the engine in a position where not that much is happening. It has no clue what it's talking about. If you are going to trust it anyway, at least try to see what the answer to your "inaccurate move" is suggested to be. But I think it's kind of right in this case: 3.c4 appears to fight for the center, but I'd say it makes your fight ...


0

Yes, the move gains space but willingly weakens control over key dark squares (c5 and e5). Black may continue: 2...e6 3.c4 Bc5, with no problems whatsoever. Black has developed two pieces and White's spent three tempi just to set up a pawn on d5 (which would arguably be better back on d4).


2

When comparing two lines with the help of the engine, it often helps to play around with the moves by switching them between different lines and analyze the difference. Compare for example 1. e4 e6 2. d4 a6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 (borrowing Stockfish's preferred third move) dxe4 5. Nxe4 and 1. e4 e6 2. d4 a6 3. Nc3 d5 (borrowing Stockfish's preferred answer ...


4

It shouldn't be so much a question of why, but rather how to approach understanding a move like 2.d5. Otherwise one can endlessly ask questions of this nature and you cannot realistically be expected to learn every single of them independently. So shift your focus onto learning to adopt the strategic mindset and how to reason about opening theory. This will ...


15

White (Rigaud) did not have a Fide rating. Until 1981, the Fide rating floor was 2200, which means that any rated player had at least 2205 and that non-rated players taking part in a Fide-rated event were given a provisionnal rating of 2200. This is the case of Rigaud in Nice 1974. In other words, 2200 only means that the player was unrated. This was ...


2

This sometimes comes from playing unfamiliar openings. 2. f4 (King's gambit) is nowadays such; it was played much more commonly 100 years or more ago. It has a hidden "flaw" for White, the ability of Black's queen to check at h4. White must keep the pawn on f4 to protect the pawn e4 from this threat. The mistake can come from lack of experience. A ...


3

The drawback of 2. d5 is that it moves a pawn twice before other pawns and pieces have moved. As Black, I would counter with 2... c6, attacking the d5 pawn a second time (1... Nf6 already attacked it once). If White exchanges, 3. d5xc6 Nxc6, White has lost a lot of time moving the pawn a third time, and allowing Black to develop both knights. If White ...


3

I don't remember where I read it, but this piece of general principle applies: In the opening, gaining space is great, but the priority is to develop your pieces. 2. d5 does indeed gain space, but it does nothing for development (White's pieces still have the same lines available to them). Furthermore, 2. d5 actually strains White's position because the d5-...


0

That's the Indian Game: Pawn Push Variation. It's not super common but it's fine. Most common defense (per chess.com opening explorer) is 2. ... c5 and a transposition to the Benoni. Your preparation should include some lines that are not at all common but have served black well in the chess.com database: ... e5 and ... c6. If you're looking to get off ...


5

In this case, because you probably cannot maintain it, and it will become weak. The principles of not making too many pawn moves, and developing your k-side and pieces quickly take precedence. It may also be too early to determine that d5 will be the most useful move. [Title ""] [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. d5 e6 3. c4 (3. Nc3 Bb4 4. dxe6 fxe6) exd5 4. cxd5 ...


23

In short, after some investigation, I do not believe that white was a 2200 player is the real answer. First, I found it odd that it says he was exactly 2200. This is the only tournament I can find that he ever played, and it was an Olympiad, which had to be FIDE rated. He was also from Brazil, which was not a strong chess region in the world at that time. It ...


5

Anyone can make a mistake. Masters don't make many that are this bad this early in the game, but it does happen. I don't agree with your statement that this game demonstrates that White "lack[s] the very basics of opening principles". He traded a wing pawn for a center pawn, which is very much in line with opening principles. It's just that the move loses ...


9

It's not that unpopular amongst off-beat lines that can emerge from the Sicilian defense, on top which it has a natural tendency to transpose to Owen defense type of positions. As to why it's not as popular as Sicilian mainlines, much similar to 1.b3 or 1...b6 openings, 1...c5 2...b6 is not a sound starting setup strategically, for the following summarised ...


4

Probably for a few reasons: First, it is too slow in a sharp opening. Second, it does nothing to develop the k-side in an opening that is renowned for many games that the black king gets caught in the center. Third, it does little to control the center, and in particular, d4. Forth, it is too early to determine if the Bc8 will go to b7 or a6, which is ...


3

2.c4 is generally considered the best way to take control of the center after 1.d4 Nf6, since 2.e4 is no longer possible, but after 1.e4 e6 2.d4 a6 White already has the ideal central Pawn formation e4-d4, and has no need or hurry to push another Pawn to control the d5 square with c2-c4. He can simply begin developing some pieces instead. Of course 3.c4 is ...


4

It's not inaccurate whatsoever. 3.c4 is just as good a move as 3.Nf3, 3.Nc3, etc. In general you should take what engines say that early on with a grain of salt, unless the position is already extremely tactical. What was the evaluation drop when you played 3.c4, and what depth was Stockfish thinking at? For me, at depth 27 Stockfish 10 goes down from 0....


0

If you play d5 vs 1.d4 and want a positional game that is also active the French seems like the natural choice. Alekhine's defense might be another choice if avoiding theory is the main concern.It is both active and fairly positional. Simple to learn and probably playable up to GM level. There are 10 "normal" responses to 1.e4. 1...c5 and 1...e5 are what ...


0

First off, A fianchetto allows a lot of advantages. The bishop is moved to a position where it has a lot of control of the center and potentially a lot of mobility. The position is versatile and allows the fianchetto side to develop freely and dictate the position to some extent. If the opponent castles queenside, he is castling into a ferocious attack. If ...


7

First, you should never say "X is worth Y amount of pawns". You could think in terms of it being worth ABOUT that amount all things equal, but never make assumptions about exact values. The position always determines the value of the pieces. Often quoted values are only rules of thumb or guidelines. There are entire books written about how to value pieces in ...


1

As you mentioned, White weakens Black's pawn structure in all these trades, causing the c-pawns to become doubled. The question of whether this is worth giving up a bishop for a knight is a good one, and many chess players disagree on it. Basically if you're the kind of player who isn't that biased towards bishops over knights, such trades could be good ...


9

With each of the trades that you mentioned, it is not just a B for N. Beyond that, the side giving up the B also doubles the other side's pawns, but it is still deeper than that. In each case, the doubling also leaves one of the remaining Bs with less prospects. For example, in the Nimzo, after Bb4xc3, after bc, the Bc1 is often a bit of a problem in many ...


9

In general there are two scenarios in the opening where one side might want to exchange one of their bishops for a knight. The knight controls key squares in the center which are being contested. In the Nimzo, for instance, the knight on c3 controls e4. White would really like to put a pawn there. Pinning and then exchanging that knight makes the e4 pawn ...


7

Very good question! This illustrates a deeper conflict between chess "principles" and "practice" I have learned the bishop pair is worth a half pawn Very dangerous piece of advice here! That is true in certain spots, I'd say most, but definitely not all the time. Piece activity, pawn structure, king exposure and many other factors can determine whether ...


0

The position you are concerned about doesn't qualify as a stubborn Semi-Slav in my opinion. At most, it is a very passive Semi-Slav where the Nc7 lost two tempi to reach a waiting spot, and neither of Black's usual breaks, ...e5 and ...c5, will be attractive in the near future. Moreover, the hook on h6 has provided you with a very nice target. White has ...


0

If I was trying to explain this to a beginner, I would say that black is up a pawn with no compensation. Yes, white's position is dangerous but black is fully equal. Refer to the engine for specific lines.


1

White- Bishop's opening (very versatile). Alapin and exchange variations vs french.ck, alekhines. Main lines vs cc and nimzo. 150 attack vs pirc/robatsch. Black- vs e4 play the classical vs the Ruy and against everything else look for lines that play a quick d5. d4- Choose between either the tarrasch or dutch. Both are system-type openings in that you ...


1

I would say 1. Nh3. 1.f3 is bad however after g3 white is only down a couple of tempos and has a somewhat reasonable position. 1.Nh3 allows black the potential to to wreck white's pawn structure and even threaten a very quick mate. Yes, white can avoid that with Ng4->Nf3 but you've wasted two tempos when you could have done the same thing with 1.Nf3 ...


15

From the Wikipedia article on the Fried Liver, Italian way of cooking liver ("Fegatello" means to put the liver in a net and cook it over a fire, or, in modern times, in a pan. Here we can see a metaphor for what happens to Black’s king in this line: it is cooked like a "fegatello". Usually Black’s king is caught in the mating net and White ...


1

As an avid Caro-Kann player, I would like to give my two cents. Some answers have mentioned that the knight can go to f5 with the idea of putting pressure on d4. This is in my experience not very useful. Even with a knight on c3, simply by playing Nf3 in addition to the defense exerted by the Queen, the d4 pawn is often sufficiently protected. So the ideal ...


1

When you run the analysis on Chess Play & Learn, it displays the name of the opening.


0

b5 looks HORRIBLE. If there were not a pawn on c6, you could play a6, like in the Benko, but here, a6 would be answered by bc with a winning position. It really does just drop a pawn for nothing as you gain no development advantage, or positional trumps.


2

There're several closely-related interpretations of your question that can change the answer. Do chess AIs still use old-style opening books? As I understand it, all chess engines these days can be configured to use an opening book, or to not use an opening book. So the answer is "if you want them to". If you want them the engine to use an opening book, ...


1

It isn't likely to be the app you were using, but the Stockfish iOS app displays it: (if you play more moves, the ECO code and opening name may change, to e.g. A81 Dutch defense) I suspect many more (or even most) apps do it, or have at least an option to enable it in the settings. Stockfish does not say the name of the opening, though.


1

There is a new book on the Scotch by Alexander Khalifman (who is sort of an ex world champion).


1

The best way, in my opinion, to learn opening theory is to study a chess database. Chessbase has a free one online, and so does chesstempo. Look up games that match a particular position of your choosing. See what moves strong players play (also look at win percentages). Think about what moves you or an opponent would play in a particular position, and see ...


1

Kasparov has some good examples. Se http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chesscollection?cid=1017006


-1

To expound upon Allure's totally correct comment, 3...Ne4 is just horrible, and borderline losing by force. As he stated 3...d6 is the book move, and is the preferred move in 31907 games in my Mega 2019 database with a white winning percentage of 59.4% (which is still a lot higher than I would have guessed considering the drawish reputation of the Petrov). ...


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