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7

This set up is often called "The Hippo", the reason is that bishops look like the eyes of a hippopotamus. For example: Eric Rosen: Don't Mess With The Hippo


3

1.b3 is Nimzo-Larsen attack. You can check with Lichess database.


6

The setup after b3+Bb2 or g3+Bg2 (or on Black's side b6+Bb7, g6+Bg7) is called a fianchetto https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fianchetto. Doing this on both Kingside and Queenside is thus called a "double fianchetto"; I don't think there's a more specific name than that.


1

1.b3 is called Larsen's opening, while 1.g3 is Benko's opening. They are examples of openings that are collectively called modern or hypermodern. If you have doubts about opening names, I think the easiest thing to do is play them on a chess engine. Usually the engine will then tell you what is the corresponding name of the opening.


1

Depending on what database you look at, all three moves (5.c3, 5.Nc3, 5.Bd2) are playing in this position. Nc3 and c3 are the most common, but Bd2 is played sometimes. A lot of the play in the French Exchange is centered around the central squares and the open e-file. Quite often, White will play c4 and Nc3 and try to deploy their bishops at d3 and f5 or g4. ...


1

I would say that 5.Nc3 is better than 5.Bd2 because 5.Bd2 would allow Black to exchange Bishops very early in the game. It is a general principle that more piece exchanges lead to less complicated middlegames and to more chances of draw, which is naturally something that favors Black. The move 5.c3 does not look optimal to me since, as you said, it blocks ...


13

It appears to be 4...Bb4+ that's the unusual move here. The chess.com database only shows one game with it, and that's the game that continued with 5.c3. When you have the position after Bb4+ on the board and it shows 5.Nc3 with a bunch of games, it's actually showing games that transposed into that position - the Nc3 was played earlier in the game. Given ...


2

Nothing special happens. Engines play whatever positions you give them. They have no understanding of the word 'absurd'. If you want them to play with a naked king against 3 queens, they'll do it. They'll lose, of course, but they'll do it. If your question is actually "can a human GM beat an engine if the opening is absurd enough?" the answer is ...


3

I find watching the latest generation of self-taught AIs play is incredibly exciting - and of course they are relatively opaque as is much of AI these days. Maybe openings turn out to be relatively tractable in that there are not so many fundamentally sensible options, given the transpositions which are possible. A player who begins with a few garbage moves ...


2

Just my opinion. Watch the GMs, epically Nakamura, play very unusual openings, odds games, and other stunts against the "mere" 2600s, and you'll find that they still win from a bad position. AlphaZero has shown that it can sacrifice several pawns against the highest rated chess engine. (Game Changer: AlphaZero's Groundbreaking Chess Strategies ...


3

For example, after 1. e4 e5 you could play 2. f4 or 2. Nf3, and the computer will tell you they're both top moves in this position without marking either of them as an inaccuracy or a mistake. That's because there is a line of code in the program which says something like: If (move is in book) then set move value = accurate else call regular evaluation ...


1

Generally though, the more pieces are on the board, the harder it is for engines to find a big advantage because there are many possible moves which make it harder for the engine to predict the outcome and alter the positional score greatly. The answer really is that in some middlegames (closed positions) will often allow you to make many moves since not too ...


2

At 1400 on chess.com, openings aren't your main issue. Five moves of theory should be fine. Your opponent will throw in a Rb8 when you're attacking his king anyways so you won't be in theory for long. At your level, chess is 99% tactics. However, the concepts behind said 5 moves are still important to know and understand. Like in the Caro-Kann, Nd7 stops ...


1

There doesn't appear to be a way to do this directly. There's a predetermined list of columns available, and this isn't one of the choices. And, while the ECO Code field will allow you to type in a different ECO code than the one it auto-detects, it won't save anything other than a valid ECO code, so you can't just type in something like "Sicilian" ...


1

I find the answer quite obvious: Maybe White has only a 55% advantage in average GM play, but if you are a beginner, it's far much easier to botch up your position with Black. (I'm speaking with personal experience - I managed to lose in 10 moves, and even being a FM, with Black I must fight for my life each time.) My personal suggestion would not be trying ...


3

It's hard to say without analyzing your games but I imagine there are two parts of your problem. General lack of opening principals Investing time in learning concepts like "what is the goal of the opening" can be just as valuable as practicing tactical puzzles. Openings aren't just about memorizing move sequences but there are plenty of general ...


4

The path to mastering the openings isn't memorising moves and variations, it's understanding why certain moves are played in specific positions, why certain moves are favoured over others. Memorisation is a shortcut to understanding, not a replacement. There are sharp offshoots of most opening systems that mean you have to be aware of certain traps and ...


3

You are right that memorizing tons of variations will be neither very helpful nor very entertaining. However, proper "study" of chess openings is much more than just blind memorization! The key is to learn the general principles and common patterns (strategical as well as tactical). This is what will actually enable you to "just play" in ...


0

Try the Grunfeld or King's Indian Defense. 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 (usually the follow-up, although 2. Nf3 is also common) 2...g6 3. Nc3 is the start of both lines, then either 3...d5 for the Grunfeld or 3...Bg7 for the King's Indian. Although the Grunfeld involves ...d5, it is by no means symmetric (usually). The main line continues 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3, ...


0

i dont know how strong it is but i always play the budapest gambit 1.d4,Nf6 2.c4,e5!? 3.dxe5,Ng4 4.Nf3,Nc6 5.Bf4,Bb4+ 6.Nbd2,Qe7 for a few different reasons. the best of these reasons is a trap that ends in checkmate. ive won at least 50 games with it. after 7.a3?,Ngxe5 8.Bxe5,Nxe5 9.axb5??,Nd3#.


4

I suggest c5. As commented by @NoseKnowsAll it is called the Old Benoni Defense. If white is a pro they will probably have an edge because of their experience but generally, for your criteria (it is not symmetrical) it has the highest statistics for black winning in some of the databases such as https://www.365chess.com/opening.php?m=2&n=7&ms=d4&...


0

Try the Stafford Gambit; not famous amongst GMs but for beginners and intermediate its a gambit which gives a lot of options. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nc6 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0Ibh5B0ooo&t=5s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zd98Nd-Cdfc


3

One hundred years ago grandmasters, even the great Capablanca, were given to making sweeping judgments about opening positions without supporting evidence, often condemning moves that have been shown to be quite playable. In fact 5...Bxc3 is now considered a "book" move, though 5...O-O is probably slightly better. And as to 5.d3 making the exchange ...


0

Alex (may he RIP) told me: "Nf3 I can choose whether or not to play d4 and when...if at all. With Nf3 I blackmail the opponent. With white I play for solid advantage and black has to play precisely not be worse. With black it is worth it to play more "dynamically" and take a risk.


1

I think there is no simple answer to this question and you will develop understanding day by day. In chess basically, the bishop is more valuable than the knight in an open position. When the black exchange the bishop with the knight, it would be a bad exchange. Furthermore, you can not take the e4 pawn. Example variant is 5 .. Bxc3 6.dxc3 Nxe4 7. Re1 d5 8. ...


2

This is called the English Opening. The objective of the opening is to apply pressure on the center d5 square without committing the queen pawn or the king pawn. The standard response is 1..., e5 (Reversed Sicilian), but there are many other options, 1..., c5 for example (Symmetrical) or 1..., e6, a more manuevering type of game. This opening is known for ...


3

I suspect you are looking for OpeningTree


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