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0

I believe that the tactics rating start on 100n rating. After solving puzzles, the change in rating decreases, so that eventually, you'll reach a rating which reflects your accuracy.


1

The easy solution is to learn a system - i.e., London System; King's Indian Defence; etc. Look through a few setups and weigh the pros and cons. Then, pick 2 - one for the d-pawn opening and one for the e-pawn opening. Play around 50 games with this system to get the hang of it. I'll leave you to work the rest out.


2

Take the position after 12...Ne5. [FEN "r3kb1r/ppq1n1pp/2p1Ppb1/4n3/2P2B2/5NN1/PP2BPPP/R2QK2R w KQkq - 1 13"] There are plenty of tactics here. The e5 knight is pinned to the queen. You're attacking it twice, with your knight and bishop, and it's defended twice, with a pawn and queen. Qd7 would be checkmate if Black stopped protecting that square, ...


2

practice practice practice. that is the answer to the question. and there are far more tactics than the few you mentioned. if you really think you know them all then name another 20 of them.


3

I know every tactical theme pin, fork, weak backrank, deflection, etc. But upon analyzing this game, couldn't find any. If you can't recognize a pin (e.g. 9. Bg5) then you don't know what a pin is. Here are 4 tactical themes in the first 20 moves: 9. Bg5 - pin 12. e6 - discovered attack 17. Qe3 - pin 20. ... Qxe6 - self-pin How can I improve my recognition ...


2

Perhaps so called theoretical knowledge has no real use. You should ask why your rating/ability has not been improving. At only 120 games you are a total beginner. I presume you meant online games. If those were actual OTB tournament games then you need to switch to checkers. You need to play less and study more effectively. Just playing games will not ...


1

The tactics trainers cannot be compared to each other. You need to compare them to a specific person as everybody has different needs and preferences. That said, all the ones I have seen are done poorly from an educational perspective which would most effectively help you improve as fast and as far as you could.


1

If you have a PGN file of those position you could use my site for that. There are already a couple of people using the site not to study openings but have uploaded PGNs of endgame positions to train. If your PGN software specifies a starting position not inside of a "FEN" header let me know: https://github.com/ArneVogel/listudy/issues/2


4

After reading the comments, now I understand the question. The answer is simple: time. On ChessTempo you don't have a time limit, while on Puzzle Rush you have to answer within a few seconds if you want to make it to problem #25 or above. You also get a 1500 ChessTempo rating by getting right a certain amount of problems at that level (if you get them every ...


1

In Dutch, the two attacking pieces involved in a discovered attack (or the two defending ones in a pin, which is basically the flip side of a discovered attack) are called 'kopstuk' and 'staartstuk', literally translated 'head piece' (the black bishop) and 'tail piece' (the black rook). Preparing a discovered attack like this is called 'staartstuk plaatsen', ...


49

I believe that the game you speak of is the extremely famousLasker-Thomas match in which Lasker forces Black to accept his queen "sacrifice" on move 11. It followed by a king hunt in which Black's king is forced to the last rank by White, who then finishes the game with the king giving a discovered check from the unmoved a8 rook. The game is ...


4

1700-2000 rated problems are generally going to be 2-3 moves or at the very least forcing combinations. They shouldn't take 10 minutes or anywhere near that. If you're spending that long on them that means you're lacking the pattern recognition of the simpler tactics that are the building blocks. You need to work on solving simpler 1 and 2 move combinations ...


3

You have to be honest with yourself at first. It is impossible that you gonna solve all the puzzles, you will ALWAYS be facing one or other that you can not solve in time. SO, use this to your advantage! Expect this one. Search for this one. Wait patiently for this one. And when it comes, laugh about it, because you was prepared for it. Also, obviusly, study ...


0

Checkers is at the point where it is all memorization. For Fischer chess was too close to that for him to really enjoy it any more. For most of us chess still has enough problems to solve to keep us interested.


2

You deal with frustration in many ways. If the self help books do not cure you then see a shrink. If you meant to ask how do you learn to solve puzzles faster then it would depend on your ability. Everybody hits their limit at some point. Otherwise you need to study more first then solve puzzles of that type. Just doing random problems will not help you ...


5

It happens every day to a lot of players! Some problems are very hard and can be very frustrating. My advice would be to try hard during "your 10 minutes", and if the problem is challenging to move on without seeing the solution. Come back to the puzzle after you've had a break and cleared your head. At least, that works great for me!


4

While tactical skills (calculating accurately several moves ahead) can definitely translate, everything else is completely different


9

They are related, but probably not the same. If you play an opening like the King's Indian you are probably an aggressive, attacking player, but you may rely more on the understanding of the position than on tactical tricks. Similarly, there are certain types of position where accurate calculation is required but with defensive purposes. Aggressive and ...


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