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3

How competitive? Your chances of becoming a GM are fat slim and none. You might reach IM if you spent enough time on the game, but there is no guarantee. You should be able to reach expert level if you try,but even NM would be unlikely unless you dont have a life and only do chess. As to tournaments you can always play. They have them for all levels of ...


4

It's not late. Starting early in only important if you aim at the very top. I've had a student who started in his forties and managed to enjoy hundreds of games of competitive chess, with somewhat decent results (he reached 1800 while having a full-time job and a family). Join a chess club and play your first tournament as soon as you can. Also, what is your ...


5

There is no reason you can't get into competitive chess unless you hold yourself back. I played as a child and into my late teens and then stopped. It wasn't until around 8-10 years ago that I picked it back up and playing in competitively in tournaments only recently. I know the chances are really low that I'd become a GM but if I become a local good club ...


9

Sure why not! The important thing is to enjoy the game and learn whatever life lessons you can take from it along the journey. Chess offers tremendous companionship and fun and that is what is more important than focusing on results (which will inevitably follow as you keep improving learn from your mistakes). Make sure you keep a database of the games --- ...


3

Definitely not to late. I know people who have taken up chess in retirement to reasonable club level success. There is literally nothing holding you back. Go get em.


2

This answer is about the FIDE Laws of Chess effective from 1 January 2018. There does not seem to be any explicit provision for a player updating their scoresheet using their opponent’s scoresheet, except where exactly one player has stopped recording moves due to low time (Article 8.5.2): If only one player has not kept score under Article 8.4, he must, as ...


2

Anyone initiating communication with their opponent should do so on their own time. Initiating communication with an opponent on the opponent's time (barring common sense exceptions, such as to warn them that they didn't hit their clock) warrants a warning, and repeated instances a game loss. If your opponent is using their time to correct their sheet, that'...


9

Am I obligated to let an opponent see my game record so they can make corrections to theirs? According to USCF rule 15D3, it's suggested that you do so, but it's not mandatory unless the tournament director tells you to: The opponent is urged to comply with such a request, but this is not mandatory. If the opponent denies the request, the player may stop ...


2

We run the annual South African Junior Chess Championships - The history of this tournament dates back more than 30 years and the tournament typically attracts in excess of 2,500 junior chess players and officials


1

Is pointing at pieces during your turn okay? Regardless of whether or not such gestures are permitted I try to avoid them during play. A chess player should avoid providing any insight into their thought process or mood during the game. Sharing such information may give the opponent an edge. As others have said, attempting to distract or confuse the ...


3

This has pretty much been covered by the other questions: there is no rule specifically forbidding this practice, but it might be considered distracting or annoying. One thing the other answers didn’t cover: hovering your hand over the pieces when it’s your opponents turn. I saw, in a club tournament, a player did this when they were low on time and the ...


2

There are tournaments that have a "touch" rule that indicates that if you touch the piece you must move the piece. There are tournaments where if you touch a piece as long as you don't let go of the piece (unless moved back to its original position), does not constitute a move, eg; I could hold my hand on my queen, pick it up, then put it back down ...


29

Hovering your hand over the pieces does not violate the touch-move rule, but it is bad etiquette and arguably violates the rule against annoying your opponent ("It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever.", say the FIDE Laws of Chess, §11.5 in the 2018 edition.) Here's the explanation given in Chess for Dummies: ...


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