Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
73

According to the 2017 version of the Laws of Chess, rule 11.10 says: Unless the regulations of an event specify otherwise, a player may appeal against any decision of the arbiter, even if the player has signed the scoresheet (see Article 8.7).


54

It's frankly quite boring to watch chess, unless you understand what is going on - it's not like football, basketball or hockey, where there is dynamic, action, fast-paced play - for us, chess players, it might appear that chess is dynamic and fast-paced, but this is not so for the common viewer. Let's be honest, would you really want to watch a chess game ...


41

I will write from the perspective of my home country, USA. If you are in a different country, you can likely find parallels. Is it too late for me to be ambitious? It is never too late to learn more. I am aiming for a GM title in 5 years time. I don't doubt my learning abilities or memory, as is usually the case for the older aspirants, since I ...


41

No, there shouldn't and if you live to be 80 you will probably understand why. A few years ago in a tournament where I was one of the arbiters a 16 year old boy was playing an old guy in his 80's in round 2, both of them were rated about 1950. There had recently been the case of the Bulgarian phone cheat who had consulted a phone hidden behind one of the ...


36

It depends what you mean by 'professional'. If you want to support yourself solely by playing tournaments, the answer is definitely no. At the very least that would require being in the top 50 in the world which takes a lifetime of work starting at a very young age. If you want to support yourself by playing and teaching, that is much more feasible. ...


31

Sponsorship is more like an investment. For example in video game competitions, companies like Sony and Redbull may invest money, of course, in the hopes that their audience will be more likely to purchase Sony or Redbull products since the players are using them. In your example, I don't see what Google AlphaZero has to gain from casual enthusiasts by ...


27

Yesterday, I played a tournament match, and at the table next to me the guy asked his opponent for his rating. “I don’t really know...” was the reply, “about 1580, I think. And yours?” “Euhm... about 1400”, the guy mumbles in reply. If you don’t want to give out your exact rating in reply or you don’t know it yourself, I would not ask the question to begin ...


27

There is nothing in principle preventing players from long tournaments. Or maybe yes if they are way too long, like the first Karpov - Kasparov match (had to be postponed for health reasons), but these cases are far from the norm. If we stick to the elite games, I would say that the main reasons why tournaments have become shorter is that there are many ...


26

You can declare a draw and in fact you are required to declare a draw but only after you have counted 75 moves by each side without a capture or a pawn move. This is according to the FIDE Laws of Chess article 9.6.2: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five ...


25

I think there is only one reasonable answer: You're too old. Learning chess is like learning a language. And that's not a metaphor. You learn "chunks" of piece constellations, just like you would learn typical turns of phrase. You get a feeling which phrases and expressions go together and which don't. One day you just know where to put your pieces in ...


24

I don't think this would be a breach in etiquette - but I think it is a somewhat dangerous thing to do for you. Chess is as much about mental fortitude as it is about "playing skill" and regardless what your opponents answer is - it can get into your head and affect your play. If your opponent is a lot lower rated than you are, it tempts you to play these "...


22

The procedure is (FIDE rules): move the pawn to its promotion square, then replace it with the piece you want. You can take it from the captured pieces yourself, your opponent does nothing. If the piece isn't readily available, you can stop the clock and ask the arbiter to bring one. Your choice of piece is only finalized when it touches the promotion square....


21

Seeing how Super Grandmasters capture pieces can be instructive: Garry Kasparov Capturing an adjacent piece: Capturing a distant piece: Source: YouTube Carlsen (white) vs Caruana Source: YouTube Aronian (white) vs Morozevich Source: YouTube Hikaru Nakamura (white) vs Vladimir Kramnik Source: YouTube Summary: With the exception of Kramnik, ...


21

It means Tournament Performance Rating. Very roughly a TPR of 2551 means that the results this player has achieved in this tournament would have been expected of a player rated 2551. That's always a bit problematic. Say you scored 100% against a group of 1500 players, what kind of player would have expected to score that? Well, a 1900 player probably, but ...


18

Some things that have helped me get better are: Counter-intuitively, continue to work hard on your slow game. The best speed game players in the world just happen to be the best slow game players. When playing slow games, you are giving your brain more "soak time" to absorb patterns and really grind into positions, giving your analysis ("I takes, he takes, ...


18

I think aiming for GM is really unrealistic. Aiming for the GM title is something that players do who are IM, have improved since, and feel they want to push further. I think that amount of preparation time could work, but it's not the most important thing. Most important is playing serious tournament games. Chess is not about knowledge, it's about skill, ...


18

Perhaps another factor is that transport and communications were so much more limited in the 19th century, that a short tournament would not have justified lengthy travel, particularly for transatlantic professionals visiting Europe. At an amateur level in Britain, the burgeoning train network allowed evening visits from one provincial town to a neighbouring ...


17

Writing to FIDE will make you feel better but is otherwise a waste of your time. Let's step through and see why. First, getting up and walking around is perfectly acceptable behaviour. Here's what the FIDE Laws of Chess have to say - 11.2.1 The ‘playing venue’ is defined as the ‘playing area’, rest rooms, toilets, refreshment area, area set aside for ...


17

In this case, is it allowed to warn your opponent of the potential danger of flagging? Yes. The rule which limits talking to your opponent is the one which forbids annoying the opponent, article 11.5 - 11.5 It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. This includes unreasonable claims, unreasonable offers of a draw or ...


17

It is not a drawn position according to the rules, since there is sufficient mating material. It may be a draw from the point of view of endgame theory, but given players who make lots of mistakes, it wouldn't be all that surprising for one to lose to a tactic. I would let them play until the player who wanted a draw can claim it based on the 50-move rule ...


17

Biggest reason? Indecisive games. Hard to make money for sponsors when 60%+ of the time there’s no winner. In a sporting event, no one likes ties. Possible avenues are faster time controls, where at least spectators don’t waste half a day watching no one win. Back in the 19th century Steinitz had match rules that required players to reset the pieces and ...


15

The engine alone is just one factor; the number of CPU's used, memory, etc. makes the engine stronger. The same engine on an Intel 286 will not be nearly as strong as on the Cray Titan supercomputer, for example. Also, the number of cores makes a difference too. For example, Houdini 3 can take advantage of 32 cores if available. But from the list below, ...


15

Chess as an activity is not appealing to many women. Because there are so few women in open tournaments, it can be quite intimidating for a girl or woman to start playing the game. Imagine being one of the 1-3% of female players at a large open tournament. They receive constant attention and stares (it is much worse if they are conventionally attractive). ...


15

Hate to dash your dreams but 15-20 tournaments (especially in the US, but pretty much anywhere) is not going to cut it, even if it were granted that 1900 on chess.com directly translated to 1900USCF. 1) Ratings involving different pools of players will of necessity diverge. It's the nature of the mathematics involved, so I can say with a great degree of ...


15

Yes, press the clock with the same hand you use to move pieces is an actual rule in official tournaments (see Article 6.2.b of the FIDE Laws of chess). Concerning the placement of the clock before the game, "the arbiter shall decide where the chessclock is placed" (see Article 6.5 in the same link as above). However the arbiter doesn't always give a ...


15

First, we cannot tell you what the arbiter should have done because we were not there and certainly don't have all the facts. We only have your version of events. What you say was very disturbing may not have been perceived as so disturbing to others there at the time. We weren't there, so we just don't know. We can't judge. As to what you should have done, ...


15

Today we get tournaments such as: Chess World Cup 2005 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2007 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2009 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2011 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2013 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2015 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2017 - 128 players Chess World Cup 2019 - 128 players Of course these tournaments only last ...


14

The numbers refer to rules in the FIDE laws of chess. 6.2. A player must press his clock with the same hand with which he made his move. It is forbidden for a player to keep his finger on the clock or to ‘hover’ over it. The rule that you have to press the clock with the same hand that you use to move the pieces is there to prevent players from pressing ...


12

Quite a few of these are already covered elsewhere in the rules. In the rest it would be up to the arbiter to use his judgement. I will quote the rules where relevant and state what I would have done as an arbiter. 2.1 Player A leaves the table (not the hall) - it is Player A's turn to move. Explicitly covered by article 12.2: 12.2 Players are not ...


12

"Tournament performance rating". An approximate measure of the strength that a player performed/played at in the tournament. The calculation of such a performance rating varies, but one method is as follows: If you beat someone at rating X, your performance for that game is X + 400. If you lose to this person, your performance for that game is X - 400. If ...


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