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This is a funny situation - in a FIDE tournament, it depends on whether you're talking about White or Black. To claim a draw in FIDE tournaments the procedure is as follows: 1) Write down the move you are planning to make that will result in a three-fold repetition. Do NOT make the move. 2) Call over the arbiter and explain what move you're about to make, ...


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Just to add another chapter into this question, here is a small problem that I made that demonstrates how the rook can move through squares that are attacked. If it were on a board, it would defintely frustate a few people. That is the exact point of this little excercise! [Title "White To Move, Checkmate In Two Moves"] [FEN "8/8/8/8/pppbbp1N/nr2pppr/q2n3p/...


10

FIDE Laws of Chess 7.4a If during a game it is found that an illegal move, ..., has been completed, the position immediately before the irregularity shall be reinstated. If the position immediately before the irregularity cannot be determined the game shall continue from the last identifiable position prior to the irregularity. The clocks shall be ...


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Would it be sufficient here to write Ne4+ (meaning Nce4) only (i.e. without the "c" but with "+"), as Nfe4 would not be check? It depends on exactly what you mean by "sufficient". By "normal" definitions of "sufficient" the answer is obviously "yes". "Ne4+" disambiguates and leaves the human reader in no doubt which knight was moved. However it doesn't ...


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The FIDE Laws of Chess 2018 are unambiguous: you should write Nce4, and the + sign is optional and not disambiguating. Ne4+ is not sufficient. Appendix C (algebraic notation), article C.10 basically tells you to write Nce4 to distinguish it from Nfe4. It does not mention check or other ways to disambiguate. Article C.13 notes that writing "+" to indicate ...


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I would say yes, but it certainly does not hurt to write Nce4+. What is one extra character among friends? :)


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Yes, but one additional point: If you have started to place the king on g1, for example, but you change your mind AND you have not taken your hand off it, you can still move it one square to another square as long as you have not also touched the rook.


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I have found a real case of an arbirter denying a draw claim by threefold repetition due to the fact that Black had the right to castle in the first position. Here is a link to the game on chessgames.com. What happened was that the positon on the board was repeated three times and Karpov, being low on time, announced to the arbiter. Geurt Gijssen, on his ...


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There are no official rules regarding games with "odds", so I guess it's up to your taste for this particular case. Anyway, my first thought would be to say "No. You can't" and allowing that possibility would be making a strange twist of the rules that should be specified beforehand


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The 2019 Champions Showdown: Chess 9LX (aka Chess 960) currently taking place in St. Louis should have been a clue. Here is the relevant extract from the FIDE Laws of Chess: Guidelines II. Chess960 Rules II.3 Chess960 castling rules II.3.1 Chess960 allows each player to castle once per game, a move by potentially both the king and rook in a ...


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Unless this is a trick question, I'd say never: 3.8.2 [] This is a move of the king and either rook of the same colour along the player’s first rank, counting as a single move of the king and executed as follows: the king is transferred from its original square two squares towards the rook on its original square, then that rook is transferred to the ...


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This is an important corner case for programming and also comes up in certain chess problems. I begin explanations by saying that castling and en passant are handled slightly differently, but don’t worry about this. Each is handled in the most sensible way. Ideally one would look ahead in the game to find out whether the moves are actually playable. For en ...


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Yes, moving both the king and the rook are necessary to castle.


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Although this question has been well answered, I wish to share a chess problem that uses the weird mechanism of the pawn being pinned by the taken pawn. Enjoy! This problem can be found here on Yet Another Chess Problem Database. [Title "Brunner, Erich Anselm, Deutsches Wochenschach (8515) 1908-12, White To Move And Selfmate Themselves"] [FEN "8/8/5Q2/...


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She can claim a draw. Article 9.3 of the FIDE Laws of Chess, 2018, emphasis mine: 9.3 The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by a player having the move, if: 9.3.1 he writes his move, which cannot be changed, on his scoresheet and declares to the arbiter his intention to make this move which will result in thelast 50 moves by eachplayer having been ...


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