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2

Playing slow actually makes you play better! In a large-scale study of how neuroenhancers affect chess performance, it was found that players played better chess if they took neuroenhancers, but only because they spend more time thinking. The results contained one surprise: The amount of time that the players took in their games when they were on the ...


1

And the correct answer :-) as always is "Depends". I'm a lightning fast player, even at 60 I'm faster than most kiddies. Yes, also in blitz. I can exactly tell where the + and - of this are. I never ever get into time trouble. The only "long" game I recall losing on flag was one that was a bit shorter, horrendously complex and the ...


2

Playing slowly is absolutely fine. If you lose a game and there's time left on your clock, there's something more you could have done which may have changed the outcome. Playing too slowly is where the problem lies. Time management is just an important part of chess as chess itself is, and when you go into a 5+0 game instead of a 10+0 game, you must be ...


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Playing slow is not a bad thing, the longer the games you play the more you will learn. I am 2200+ for blitz (and bullet) but I don't learn much in these games. I know I should play at slower time controls if I want to improve my chess but I find blitz chess quite addictive! If you are happy playing 10 + 0 then stick with it (or even longer time controls if ...


2

What is slow? That depends on the person and how much they have learned so far. Also with their abilities as well as their education/training. You can play too slow for sure. You can also play too fast. Most people will need a mix of moderate time to solve a tactical problem. Along with game practice at exactly 10 seconds a move. Today's speed chess does ...


14

Playing slowly depends on the time format of the game, If you are playing a bullet time format and you play slow, then you will make very few moves and time will run out before you checkmate your opponent. If you are playing a 90mins game and you play fast, then you will probably get checkmated and spent the next 75 mins waiting for the next tournament round ...


1

if there are certain talented players who should not become competitively active cause of their mental health status On the contrary, there are many chess players, successful and otherwise, who get relief from their mental problems by playing chess. Fischer and Bloodgood are probably at the extreme end of mental disturbance but there are many at all the ...


1

The standard advice is to play a lot and analyze your games. Playing others at about or above your level is good for improving. Playing over annotated games by strong players is also recommended, such as game collections by noted players. But you seem to be playing a lot already. This along with doing tactical puzzles should improve your tactics. Since ...


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In theory, you need 10,000 hours of (good) study to master any subject. A four year goal would require about seven hours per day. GM Donaldson, quoted some time ago, studies five hours a day before a tournament just to stay at his level. The most effective improvement is in tactics. Tactics is said to be 99% of chess (various authors) and most games are ...


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Bullet and blitz are mostly for fun (especially bullet). You don't have to have the same rating in both bullet, blitz and rapid as not all the people can think that fast. Keep playing rapid games if you like them and remember that chess is a fun game. If you (plan to) play seriously (participate in competitions), then you'll realise that rapid games are by ...


0

I'm not very good at chess but enjoy playing on my ipad. Frequently I find myself in dreams or in just-awake state where the arrangement of objects and movement I perceive are experienced in chess relation to each other in space. My father played competitive chess when he was younger and my mother said he would talk moves in his sleep. In the nineties he ...


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