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2

Probably not what you're looking for, but you might still be interested in this game. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] [White "GM Andrew Tang"] [Black "Leela Chess Zero"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 O-O 7. Bd3 c5 8. dxc5 Bxc5 9. Nge2 Be7 10. O-O Nc6 11. Rc1 h6 12. ...


5

I think you will find plenty of examples of such games, in time-controlled games where it is in the interest of the losing player to keep playing for three reasons: To try and flag the winning player on time - winning. Time pressure could cause your opponent to blunder To try and salvage a draw through a stalemate. Eric Rosen who streams on youtube is one ...


16

Are there such examples of torturous winning, where a grandmaster resists his urge to resign and lets the opponent take all of his pieces before he gets checkmated? No, there aren't, for the simple reason that that sort of behaviour would require both players to behave in an extremely childish manner and childish behaviour (e.g. "hope chess") is ...


1

Playing through annotated game collections can be very useful. However in this regard I very much agree with Dan Heisman who advocates strongly for what he calls Instructive Game Anthologies. He distinguishes this from game collection books by a top grandmaster and says that the author of an instructive anthology is trying to use the game to demonstrate ...


2

To answer this question you would first have to explain what you mean by "long". If you define "long" as over the number of games played, then the next question is "which games do you count?" It shouldn't be surprising that if a grandmaster plays in their local weekend circuit against much-weaker players, they are almost never ...


1

Playing over many GM games is excellent. You get used to seeing good moves which improves your intuition at playing. Annotation is helpful but only when you have a real question about what was done. In general things that happen and are explained are rare and not that useful. Far better to study tactics than obsess about annotations. I would suggest you ...


6

Tal vs Botvinnik 1960 is very good as Tal is quite verbose in commentary and what he was thinking about during the game. In addition to the benefits you mentioned, the annotations help you understand what strong players think about in different positions and how they approach the game. Particularly useful is the strong player's positional understanding and ...


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