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1

It depends. There are two likely sets of rules: FIDE (which governs international events) and USCF (which governs United States events.) These rules differ slightly. Under FIDE rules, the default time is 0 minutes unless otherwise indicated. This means that, rather than start the clock of a missing White player, Black could simply claim immediate victory if ...


4

Play starts when the arbiter announces the start of play, usually by saying "Start white's clock". A good arbiter will then walk round the tournament room making sure that all clocks have been started. If both players have yet to arrive at a table then the arbiter will start white's clock. If a black player has not started white's clock then the ...


0

short answer, yes. But that does not mean that play no blitz. try playing 7-8 blitz games but play all the other games in longer times. the myth that you improve by playing blitz is there because you can recognize more patterns and learn how to manage time trouble. Also you can cheat because of low time (the reason why gm play blitz. But even they played ...


0

longer games will help you improve as long as you practice your tactics, openings and most important when you play online in longer formats - ENDGAMES. Please practice your endgames and don't make the same mistake I did. As for blitz, make sure to play a few games of that too. It helps for pattern recognition Just don't play bullet. But if your playing for ...


0

There is simply no other practical "punishment" for overstepping the time limit. You cannot remove a piece or something like that. In fact, the only punishment for other infractions which are not grave enough to warrant declaring the game lost is a time penalty, which clearly doesn't apply here. It's not that clear-cut though: In order to win, you ...


5

I'm wondering if there is something of the sort for on the board games The closest thing to this according to the latest FIDE Laws of Chess is article 9.6: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five times. 9.6.2 any series of at least 75 moves have been made by each ...


4

In a physical game, X and Y will normally just shake hands for the draw. However, if X insists on trying to "flag" Y, then Y can invoke the Quickplay Finish guidelines from the Laws of Chess (2018 edition), provided they are used in that tournament: III.1 A ‘quickplay finish’ is the phase of a game when all the remaining moves must be completed in ...


2

In many over the board long time control games if there's no more time to be added (so no extra time after 40/60 moves or anything) you can request a 5 second increment or delay. This counts as draw offer and if the opponent doesn't want to draw the game continues with those 5 second increment and the opponent getting a two minute time bonus. In a position ...


3

Why does a football team lose when the clock runs out? Time is a key factor in playing chess. Else you would be back in the olde days when players could take days or weeks or longer before they moved. Even postal chess has time limits. Time limits is fair for both sides. If you played faster thereby not dominating you would not have won. Why should you be ...


18

Because not having it would result in some perverse incentives. In particular, in any game where a draw is an acceptable outcome, the optimal strategy without flag drops being losses would be to never make a move and simply wait for the flag. With any partial approach like you propose, the optimal strategy would instead be to try to force such a situation (...


7

It's considered a win because that is what it is by definition from the rules of timed games. When you enter a game you commit to its rules; in this case one of those rules is that the time you have to force mate or other result is constrained by the clock, and you must adapt your strategy to meet that constraint. In the example you have given, you have not ...


12

Since you specifically asked for historical reasons: Think about your two proposed criteria in the context of the year 1800 or 1900. Using engine evaluation is obviously out of the question. So is "asking a better player", because you may often not have one at hand (physically, due to limited means of telecommunication!). Using material count is ...


9

Except for exceptional circumstances, only three results are considered valid for a chess game (and the corresponding rating change): win, draw or loss. Your suggestion would come with a huge problem: what exactly counts as flagging? How big should your advantage have been for your opponent's victory to not count as a "real" victory? Who should ...


23

Let's look at the title question from the perspective of engine chess, which is more objective in the sense that you can get two engines to play tens of thousands of games against each other at whatever time control you desire. If you look at the latest season of the unofficial world computer chess championship, you'll find that the strongest engine is ...


53

I feel like you somewhat misunderstand the concept of a time control. The clock is a part of the game. If you are up a piece in a complicated position with five seconds left on the clock that may well be a losing position for you. Sure, the engine may show you +4, but the clock is an important part, especially in blitz. Importantly, if you spent all your ...


7

Interestingly there are two FIDE documents specifying these. Fortunately they don't contradict each other. First, FIDE Handbook - General Rules and Technical Recommendations for Tournaments / 07. Time Control / says: There is a single time control for all major FIDE events: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game ...


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