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11

A typical way to do it is to treat puzzles the same as players and rate them based on whether they "win/lose" and the rating of the "opponent" ChessTempo has a nice explanation here copied below: The rating system is inspired by an idea implemented at the Chess Tactics Server. CTS treats both problem solvers and the problems as opponents with their ...


3

Partly it depends upon your learning style, but also I'd note that part of the problem with the tactics site you mentioned isn't the computer. It's you. Seriously, there's nothing stopping you from sitting and thinking about the position on the screen the same as with the position on a board. Nothing except you, that is. And in an age where more and more ...


3

I also learned primarily from books. I think much more deeply when setting up a position and working through a book rather than online. Books I feel that books are best for more positional or strategic learning where taking my time has the most benefit. I use books when there is a specific aspect that I want to learn such as pawn structures or rook ...


5

I have found that reading books makes one concentrate more, and the material is usually covered more in-depth. I think that the "in-depth" part of this is what is important. The explanations are usually much better, and geared toward learning something more permanently. I find that my work on a famous chess site that you buy materials has been much more ...


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