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3

The position with the longest known sequence away from checkmate haa a mate in 553 moves. It is a computer verified extension of the famous 549 mover (as mentioned in @Phishmaster's answer) found by Lutz Neweklowsky. By "verified," I mean Stockfish agrees with the moves that occur until a 7-piece position occurs, and then we know 100% it is correct from ...


1

One important point not yet mentioned: If you look at other Sicilian lines, black generally tries to play b5. B5 is useful for a variety of reasons: It might harass the Nc3, support a knight coming to c4 or be part of a pawn storm against the long castle. It fights the Maroczy-bind and the aggressive development Bc4. Because b5 is so ubiquitous in ...


18

This is not a book review, nor is it an opinionated account of the method. I've never really used this method per se, but have read/heard about it, so hopefully my rough summary here doesn't do disservice to the merits of the method. The Dorfman method is a two-fold scheme for finding good moves. The static elements The first fold is the static elements ...


13

"The Method in Chess" is a regressive scale of factors that you can use to evaluate a position. Here they are in order: King safety, which is more important than all the others combined. Material, and various material correlations, like Q+N vs. Q+B. He also goes into a new one B+B+N vs. B+N+N, and which pieces you should aim to trade off. Who has the better ...


1

Dynamism is at the heart of King's Indian attack (like many other openings). You cannot be fixed on always going for the kingside or alway going for the queenside. You have to be flexible with respect to all options including kingside, queenside, both sides or center conflict. Also bear in mind that it is a modern opening after all. So, regarding center and ...


1

I find Secrets of Pawnless Endings (Gambit, 2002) by John Nunn (pages 49 to 69) to be the ultimate reference about the KQvKR ending. All steps needed to force Philidor's 1777 position are described precisely, each position showing how to reduce to a previously seen position. The book of course covers stalemate cases (which are all obvious) and what I call "...


0

2...Bf5 is equal. It's a French defense with the bad bishop outside the pawn chain. 2...c5 is equal too. Black wins about 60% of the time from that position. It could transpose into French lines or it could go other directions depending on what white does. 2...e6 would just transpose to the French which isn't bad but is inferior to playing 2...Bf5 and ...


3

Look at the position. It's quite analogous to the French Defense, Advance Variation, but without Black having hemmed in his light-squared Bishop. It looks easy for Black to transpose into the Caro-Kann advance as well as the French, or even into the Nimzovitch Defense (1 e4 Nc6) so you could start looking there for lines you feel comfortable playing. My ...


3

I think this kind of thing belongs in the same category as discussions over "Could Morphy beat Lasker?" At one point it might have been provable (given a little different history Morphy might have survived to play Lasker, or at least Steinitz) but that train has left the station. It's a judo question, meaning your answer typically depends on which way you're ...


-1

Bf5 give black a big edge; Pc5 gives black a good game as replies. whites e5 was poor. pxp is best for white. nc3 is least worst alternative for white instead of pxp


6

2.e5 should give black a very comfortable game. Consider that 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 is a common line, the French defense. After 1.e4 d5 2.e5 black will get a similar setup to a French defense without the big strategic liability that is the closed-in Bc8. In the French the cramped kingside and bad Bc8 often leads to kingside attacks by white or at least ...


9

First, 2.e5 by white is probably not the strongest pure chess move, but it does have a huge advantage in that black is likely to be suprised by it. Anytime you can take your opponent out of his element, that is a small victory. In 40 years of playing, I have never seen that move played there, so that is saying something. There is no question that 2.exd5 is ...


3

I added a link to this theory in your question. The reality is that there is no debate as to whether the Soviet government ordered players to throw games, the only question is "did it happen here?" Chess was considered proof of Soviet superiority, and they took dominating, and holding the world title, very seriously. Other than that link, GM Larry Evans is ...


0

It is positional to help black achieve equality. The steinitz defense forces black to give up the center or lose a pawn. It is one alternative to try. The cozio is okay but not quite as good at achieving equality as good. The berlin defense is another solid option slightly better than morphy a6. Bb4 by black has one of the better scoring ...


0

What is endgame theory? Endgames are just special cases and principles that have been worked out over analysis of millions of end game positions and then codified into categories of similarities. And it is not easy as there are many special cases and exceptions. You will have to do all that by yourself for your new nuclear version of chess.


1

White has a possible way to break in. Just one way. But there is a risk that white might lose if he does that. but the b on h8 is dead so it really does not cost that much to try. I have not analysed in depth so you run through an engine if you care. horsies on a3 and c3, bishop on b2 or c1 and Q on d3 or e2 or f1. and it looks like q on e2 and ...


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