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If we assume chess is drawn (and all evidence points to that) then the answer is no. The "best" move would be the one that gives the best practical chance of winning and there is no way to objectively determine the best practical move. That would be like asking if rock is objectively a better move than paper or scissors. If chess is solved, computers ...


1

I've toyed with this idea in the past but never played it seriously. If you're okay with the transpositions there is nothing wrong with it at all. After 1.e4, e6 2. d4, c5 white has three main choices (3. dxc5, Bxc5 is obviously really bad for white) Nf3, cxd4 transposes to an e6 Sicilian. There's nothing wrong with that d5 is a Franco-Benoni. Black ...


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The fact is that you will need to pick a good book, which is difficult since there are a million books out there on the French. When starting out with a new opening, picking a book that is heavy on theory is not so important as is a book that presents ideas well. For this purpose, I suggest the book "Mastering the French" by GM Neil McDonald. I also ...


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You need to realize that just because someone gave it that name on move two, that it is certainly going to transpose to another opening with a different name. When determining what opening is played, classification takes place from the end of the game, and moves backward so the last known opening position is considered the opening that was played. If you ...


2

I noticed that it's very difficult to attack black in the Petrov defense. That is why it is popular at the elite levels: It is super-solid. The character of the game is going to depend on black, and the choice of where to castle. If black castles short, since white castles long, it is going to be an all-out pawn storm on opposite wings, and the person, ...


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