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9

The Polgar sisters: Training or Genius? by Cathy Forbes states that the main studying was the flash card method. (Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games by (the father)Laszlo Polgar [https://b-ok.cc/book/857033/54e4d4] provides the puzzles on the flashcards.) The most important passage (IMO) is the Judith would continue using the flash cards on her ...


3

"Opening theory" should be seen as the constant, somewhat-like-scientific search for a way to force an advantage for white in the opening. People interested in theory write opening books and opening articles that don't just repeat what was already published before, but that try to improve on the already known theory -- new tries for an advantage ...


17

In chess, "opening theory" or just "theory" means "established opening lines": usually lines that have been studied and judged to lead to more or less equal positions, and appear in books. It's unfortunate terminology since it matches neither the day-to-day meaning of the word (something that's contrasted to practice) nor the ...


2

Naturally, the heft of opening theory must pay more attention to lines which generate imbalances. Quiet, balanced openings present less immediate concern (and fewer opportunities for opening theoreticians -- who depend upon asymmetric threats to narrow their path of study). To illustrate with a simple example, consider the exchange variation of the Ruy Lopez ...


3

Openings with a lot of theory are those with extremely long book lines, especially if there are lots of viable moves at each point in the game. Here's an example of such a line. Ten moves into the game, White plays a subtle move order to provoke a non-obvious pawn move by Black, in order to get a slightly stronger initiative. If you didn't know anything ...


5

I think it's human psychology; we associate forward moves with attack and backward moves with defense. After all, chess originated as an abstract model for a real war. That said, retreating moves don't need to be unintuitive, as long as we're on the defense. I don't have a specific situation in mind either, but retreating a queen or rook to help defending ...


4

The path to mastering the openings isn't memorising moves and variations, it's understanding why certain moves are played in specific positions, why certain moves are favoured over others. Memorisation is a shortcut to understanding, not a replacement. There are sharp offshoots of most opening systems that mean you have to be aware of certain traps and ...


3

You are right that memorizing tons of variations will be neither very helpful nor very entertaining. However, proper "study" of chess openings is much more than just blind memorization! The key is to learn the general principles and common patterns (strategical as well as tactical). This is what will actually enable you to "just play" in ...


0

Try the Stafford Gambit; not famous amongst GMs but for beginners and intermediate its a gambit which gives a lot of options. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nc6 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0Ibh5B0ooo&t=5s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zd98Nd-Cdfc


3

One hundred years ago grandmasters, even the great Capablanca, were given to making sweeping judgments about opening positions without supporting evidence, often condemning moves that have been shown to be quite playable. In fact 5...Bxc3 is now considered a "book" move, though 5...O-O is probably slightly better. And as to 5.d3 making the exchange ...


0

Alex (may he RIP) told me: "Nf3 I can choose whether or not to play d4 and when...if at all. With Nf3 I blackmail the opponent. With white I play for solid advantage and black has to play precisely not be worse. With black it is worth it to play more "dynamically" and take a risk.


1

I think there is no simple answer to this question and you will develop understanding day by day. In chess basically, the bishop is more valuable than the knight in an open position. When the black exchange the bishop with the knight, it would be a bad exchange. Furthermore, you can not take the e4 pawn. Example variant is 5 .. Bxc3 6.dxc3 Nxe4 7. Re1 d5 8. ...


3

This question was put to the Norwegian supercomputer Sesse in 2019, which analyzed each opening position using Stockfish 9 to a depth of 40. Its conclusion was that there are four initial positions that give white an advantage of 0.5 or better. The maximum imbalance (worst for black) is BBNNRKRQ which has an evaluation of +0.57 in white's favor. position ...


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