25

Wikipedia claims that In early Sanskrit chess (c. 500–700) the king could be captured and this ended the game. The Persians (c. 700–800) introduced the idea of warning that the king was under attack (announcing check in modern terminology). This was done to avoid the early and accidental end of a game. Later the Persians added the additional rule that a ...


25

There is no hurry. After 8. Bb2 the bishop on b6 is not going anywhere. NxB continues to be available to white until black does something about it like a6. That means that delaying NxB gains a tempo if black has to make a less useful move to try and "save" the bishop like a6. Since recapturing with the a pawn probably gives black a better game it is worth ...


23

There are three ways to get out of check. Simply move the king away. Block the check, or place a piece in between the king and the opponent's attacking piece. Capture the piece that's checking the king. All of these cases are dependent on the fact that immediately after you make your move, the king is not in check. Therefore, you may capture the queen ...


22

Seeing how Super Grandmasters capture pieces can be instructive: Garry Kasparov Capturing an adjacent piece: Capturing a distant piece: Source: YouTube Carlsen (white) vs Caruana Source: YouTube Aronian (white) vs Morozevich Source: YouTube Hikaru Nakamura (white) vs Vladimir Kramnik Source: YouTube Summary: With the exception of Kramnik, captures ...


20

Yes, given that the opponent helps the capturing side, it is possible to capture en passant two times or more in a row Here's an example from a real game. You can find more such games here on the site. [Title "Sergey Gennadyevich Kudrin-Rudy C Douven, GMA Baleares op, Palma de Mallorca Spain, 1989"] [startply "59"] [FEN ""] 1. ...


15

How can we teach this rule to a Beginner? (in a plain language or simplified way or associating any story to it) The history gives the story. At one time pawns could only move one square at a time even on the first move. But this made the game a bit slow. To speed it up the rule was changed to allow a pawn to move either one square, as before, or two ...


14

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 4.1 Each move must be played with one hand only. In other words, the "correct" hand movement is one which uses only one hand. The order in which the opponent's piece is removed and the player's own piece moved to the capturing square is irrelevant. Note that once the captured piece has left the board it doesn't ...


13

The problem is that 5. Qxh5 isn't check, so Black has time for some back rank tricks (instead of capturing the rook on f6): [FEN "r1r4k/1p5R/3b4/4q3/B3P1Q1/1n1P3P/6P1/5R1K b - - 0 1"] 1... Kxh7 2. Rf7+ Kh6 3. Qh4+ Qh5 4. Rf6+ (4. Rh7+ Kxh7 5. Qxh5+) Kg7 5. Qxh5 Rc1+ 6. Qd1 Rxd1+ 7. Rf1 Rxf1#


12

What would be a more in-depth explanation of why capturing with the queen is a bad idea? If White retakes with the Queen he loses a piece, and stays in horrible position that is 100% lost. Below is the illustration: [Title "Capturing with the queen loses a piece in all lines"] [fen "r2q1rk1/pp2ppbp/2p2np1/6B1/3PP1b1/Q1n2N2/PP3PPP/3RKB1R w - - ...


12

The king can capture the enemy queen, as long that does not place it in check from another piece.


12

I recently looked into that very thing a couple of weeks ago, and found an excellent breakdown on it (just this one, though): The short answer is that aside from Kings, h2 & h7 are the least likely to be captured pieces (with survival rates claimed to be 73.92% and 72.29%, respectively). Regarding individual pieces' survival (from a 2,196,968 game ...


12

When a "total newbie" achieves such an overwhelming position against a computer, it most probably means that the computer was forced to make a "sub-optimal" move from time to time - to give the player a chance to win the game. The problem is that the computer has no clue what is a "reasonable" mistake from a human point of view. ...


11

Last week GM Nigel Short tweeted: Not sure I have won too many games without a single piece or pawn being captured. Short-Derakshani, Beautiful Minds Krulich Cup, rd 10. I can't find PGN of that game yet and am at work, but you can replay it at https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/krulich-cup-2016/10/1/1 - all 32 pieces still on the board, until ...


10

Short answer: Their movement is cleaner than yours, but not more legal. Longer: When you shove aside a piece with your capturing piece, it risks affecting the placement of the pieces around it. It also risks accidentally causing you to touch other pieces, bringing some other conflict into the game. So, all things considered, your way risks causing more ...


9

Remarkably, I wrote a blog on this topic last night. It is available here - http://www.chess.com/blog/SamCopeland/how-to-move-a-chess-piece. To quote myself... Both Magnus and Hikaru execute their captures by first picking up their opponent's piece, then they slide that piece to the back of their hand to be held by the ring and pinky fingers within ...


9

In this particular position both ...ab6 and ...cb6 are reasonable. Generally speaking I would prefer to take toward the center because the doubled pawns are not weak at all when they have neighbours and the enhanced control of the center might prove useful. Here however ab6 has the minus that it allows White counterplay thanks to the outside passed pawn ...


8

In simple words: if a pawn jumps two squares and lands right next to an opponent's pawn, then the opponent can capture that pawn in the following turn as if it had moved only 1 square. That is, only right after you made your jump, your opponent has the option to take by en passant, past that turn it is no longer allowed. So keywords to remember: two square ...


8

One way of thinking in these situations in the opening is the following: while white gains the bishop pair after taking on b6, it also opens up the a-file for black's rook. Moreover (as Brian Towers pointed out in his answer), depending on the situation, white may actually want to be able to place a knight on c5 in some lines down the road. So white doesn't ...


7

Since a game with all 14 piece, as kings are excluded, hanging has probably not happened yet, and will not for a long time, I will answer as best as I can. Under these circumstances, I think that the best that can be done is to locate the highest number that can. The highest that I have found so far is 6 hanging pieces, by your definition, from this game on ...


7

Take the c3 knight. Since white has developed only one piece, he can't punish you. If he takes back with the d pawn, trade queens. Now he can't castle. Then you develop, move your rooks to the center, and push him off the back of the board.


7

From Wikipedia (is this what you read?) When a pawn advances two squares from its starting position and there is an opponent's pawn on an adjacent file next to its destination square, then the opponent's pawn can capture it en passant (in passing), and move to the square the pawn passed over. However, this can only be done on the very next move, otherwise ...


7

Other than making stalemate impossible as you already mentioned, it doesn't seem to me like this would make a meaningful difference (or any difference) to the strategy of the game. If you allow your King to be captured, that's presumably the worst move you could possibly make, so with best play the King wouldn't be captured until after it has been checkmated ...


7

Both methods are legal. There is, however, one difference between the two options. If the en passant turns out to be illegal, then you must make a move involving the first piece you touched, if it is legal to so. So, if you touch the opponent's pawn first, you must capture the opponent's pawn. If you touch your own pawn first, you must move your own pawn. ...


7

Here is what the FIDE Laws of Chess have to say: 4.3 Except as provided in Article 4.2, if the player having the move touches on the chessboard,with the intention of moving or capturing: 4.3.1 one or more of his own pieces, he must move the first piece touched that can be moved 4.3.2 one or more of his opponent’s pieces, he must capture the first ...


6

I have some records from a book published in 1969. They might have been surpassed since then, but if that is the case, I was not able to locate that information. I guess, since there is no reply after ~2 weeks, this should be better than nothing. 74 captures; legal position: r1n1n1b1/1P1P1P1P/1N1N1N2/2RnQrRq/2pKp3/3BNQbQ/k7/4Bq2 w - - 0 1 Edit: In ...


6

I have seen the following. I use technique #1 though as long as one doesn't smash the pieces they are virtually the same. Pick up both your piece and their piece using the same hand, and then set yours down. (pick up my piece first, placing it on its new square, and scooping up the opponent's piece in one motion.) Pick up your piece, use it to shove theirs ...


6

As long as the queen is not protected by another piece, the king can capture it. The king can in fact be a strong attacking piece, particularly in the ending, when it doesn't have to worry as much about strong attacks against it since the enemy force has been diminished.


6

Below is for regular chess. I don't know about any chess variant which would have a rule like you describe. If you are in check you have to deal with it somehow, i.e. after your move you should not be in check anymore. If there is no move which achieves this, it is check-mate. There are at most three different ways to get out of check: move the king out ...


6

Short of tremendous blunders of moving into check, chess would be completely the same But it wouldn't be the same. There is one case where moving a king into check would not be a blunder. That case is what we currently call stalemate. If it was legal to move a king into check, then almost all cases of what is currently stalemate would instead be a win for ...


6

In the pawns only, you don't need to move so many pawns. Getting the major pieces involved early seems to be fastest: [FEN ""] 1.e4 c5 2.Qh5 Qa5 3.Qxh7 Qxa2 4.Qxg7 Qxb2 5.Rxa7 Rxh2 6.Rxb7 Rxg2 7.Rxd7 Rxf2 8.Rxe7+ Kd8 9.Qxf7 Rxd2 10.Qf5 Qxc2 11.Qxc5 Qxe4+ * I was unable to find a faster version of the piece only.


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