25

There is no hurry. After 8. Bb2 the bishop on b6 is not going anywhere. NxB continues to be available to white until black does something about it like a6. That means that delaying NxB gains a tempo if black has to make a less useful move to try and "save" the bishop like a6. Since recapturing with the a pawn probably gives black a better game it is worth ...


24

The mere act of touching one of your pieces obligates your opponent to capture it (if legally permitted) on his current move (at least according to USCF standards), unless he explicitly declares his intent to adjust the piece beforehand. Assuming the clock continued running on your opponent's time and he did eventually choose how to capture the knight, I ...


22

Seeing how Super Grandmasters capture pieces can be instructive: Garry Kasparov Capturing an adjacent piece: Capturing a distant piece: Source: YouTube Carlsen (white) vs Caruana Source: YouTube Aronian (white) vs Morozevich Source: YouTube Hikaru Nakamura (white) vs Vladimir Kramnik Source: YouTube Summary: With the exception of Kramnik, ...


15

How can we teach this rule to a Beginner? (in a plain language or simplified way or associating any story to it) The history gives the story. At one time pawns could only move one square at a time even on the first move. But this made the game a bit slow. To speed it up the rule was changed to allow a pawn to move either one square, as before, or two ...


15

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 4.1 Each move must be played with one hand only. In other words, the "correct" hand movement is one which uses only one hand. The order in which the opponent's piece is removed and the player's own piece moved to the capturing square is irrelevant. Note that once the captured piece has left the board it doesn't ...


14

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f6 3.Nxe5 fxe5 4.Qh5+ g6 5.Qxe5+ Qe7 6.Qxh8 Nf6 with ideas of trapping the queen, 7. d3 followed by Bg5 or Bh6 and there won't be any issues getting the queen out, e.g.: 7.d3 d5 8.Bg5 Nbd7 9.Nc3 b6 10.0-0-0 Bb7 11.e5 Black can try to minimize the damage after 2...f6? with something like 3.Nxe5 Qe7 You aren't losing the exchange any ...


13

Wikipedia says that the longest decisive game without a capture is: Nuber-Keckeisen, Mengen 1994 lasted 31 moves without a single capture. In the end Keckeisen, facing imminent checkmate, resigned: [Fen ""] 1.e4 b6 2.d4 e6 3.Bd3 Bb7 4.Nf3 g6 5.O-O Bg7 6.Nbd2 Ne7 7.Re1 O-O 8.Nf1 d6 9.Qe2 Nd7 10.Bg5 Qe8 11.Rad1 a5 12.c3 Rc8 13.Ng3 Kh8 14.Qd2 Ng8 15.h3 e5 ...


13

The problem is that 5. Qxh5 isn't check, so Black has time for some back rank tricks (instead of capturing the rook on f6): [FEN "r1r4k/1p5R/3b4/4q3/B3P1Q1/1n1P3P/6P1/5R1K b - - 0 1"] 1... Kxh7 2. Rf7+ Kh6 3. Qh4+ Qh5 4. Rf6+ (4. Rh7+ Kxh7 5. Qxh5+) Kg7 5. Qxh5 Rc1+ 6. Qd1 Rxd1+ 7. Rf1 Rxf1#


12

I recently looked into that very thing a couple of weeks ago, and found an excellent breakdown on it (just this one, though): The short answer is that aside from Kings, h2 & h7 are the least likely to be captured pieces (with survival rates claimed to be 73.92% and 72.29%, respectively). Regarding individual pieces' survival (from a 2,196,968 game ...


11

White has a forced win of a bunch of material after either 4... g6 or 4... Ke7, but if you're into silly "psychological" justifications for moves, you could argue that 4... Ke7 makes White think a little harder to find the win, while Black can prep it. 4. ... Ke7 5. Qxe5+ Kf7 6. Bc4+ d5 7. Bxd5+ Kg6 8. h4 h6 This is the only line that leaves White with ...


11

If you are playing with clocks and he sticks to the rules then it is fine. So if he takes the knight off the board and can capture it then the rules oblige him to do it. The move is finished when the capturing piece is placed on the square and the clock is pressed. It is a bad habit though. Normally, you shouldn't touch any piece on the board until you have ...


11

Last week GM Nigel Short tweeted: Not sure I have won too many games without a single piece or pawn being captured. Short-Derakshani, Beautiful Minds Krulich Cup, rd 10. I can't find PGN of that game yet and am at work, but you can replay it at https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/krulich-cup-2016/10/1/1 - all 32 pieces still on the board, until ...


10

Short answer: Their movement is cleaner than yours, but not more legal. Longer: When you shove aside a piece with your capturing piece, it risks affecting the placement of the pieces around it. It also risks accidentally causing you to touch other pieces, bringing some other conflict into the game. So, all things considered, your way risks causing more ...


9

Since your link doesn't work, and we have no diagram of the position, I will assume that you refer to the position below: [Title "White to move"] [fen "r2q1rk1/pp2ppbp/2p2np1/6B1/3PP1b1/Q1n2N2/PP3PPP/3RKB1R w - - 0 1"] What would be a more in-depth explanation of why capturing with the queen is a bad idea? If White retakes with the Queen he loses a ...


9

Remarkably, I wrote a blog on this topic last night. It is available here - http://www.chess.com/blog/SamCopeland/how-to-move-a-chess-piece. To quote myself... Both Magnus and Hikaru execute their captures by first picking up their opponent's piece, then they slide that piece to the back of their hand to be held by the ring and pinky fingers within ...


9

In this particular position both ...ab6 and ...cb6 are reasonable. Generally speaking I would prefer to take toward the center because the doubled pawns are not weak at all when they have neighbours and the enhanced control of the center might prove useful. Here however ab6 has the minus that it allows White counterplay thanks to the outside passed pawn ...


9

In simple words: if a pawn jumps two squares and lands right next to an opponent's pawn, then the opponent can capture that pawn in the following turn as if it had moved only 1 square. That is, only right after you made your jump, your opponent has the option to take by en passant, past that turn it is no longer allowed. So keywords to remember: two square ...


8

Per wikipedia: Shortest Game with no captures The shortest decisive game ever played in master play that was decided because of the position on the board (i.e. not because of a forfeit or protest) is Z. Đorđević – M. Kovačević, Bela Crkva 1984. It lasted only three moves (1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 c6 3.e3?? Qa5+ winning the bishop), and White resigned. There ...


8

One way of thinking in these situations in the opening is the following: while white gains the bishop pair after taking on b6, it also opens up the a-file for black's rook. Moreover (as Brian Towers pointed out in his answer), depending on the situation, white may actually want to be able to place a knight on c5 in some lines down the road. So white doesn't ...


7

From Wikipedia (is this what you read?) When a pawn advances two squares from its starting position and there is an opponent's pawn on an adjacent file next to its destination square, then the opponent's pawn can capture it en passant (in passing), and move to the square the pawn passed over. However, this can only be done on the very next move, otherwise ...


7

Take the c3 knight. Since white has developed only one piece, he can't punish you. If he takes back with the d pawn, trade queens. Now he can't castle. Then you develop, move your rooks to the center, and push him off the back of the board.


6

Below is for regular chess. I don't know about any chess variant which would have a rule like you describe. If you are in check you have to deal with it somehow, i.e. after your move you should not be in check anymore. If there is no move which achieves this, it is check-mate. There are at most three different ways to get out of check: move the king out ...


6

Short of tremendous blunders of moving into check, chess would be completely the same But it wouldn't be the same. There is one case where moving a king into check would not be a blunder. That case is what we currently call stalemate. If it was legal to move a king into check, then almost all cases of what is currently stalemate would instead be a win for ...


6

[FEN ""] 1. d4 c5 2. d5 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 Nf6 6. Bf4 O-O 7. Qd2 Re8 8. Be2 e6 9. Nf3 exd5 10. exd5 a6 11. O-O Bg4 12. h3 Bxf3 13. Bxf3 Qc7 14. a4 Nbd7 15. Rfe1 Bf8 16. Ne4 Nxe4 17. Rxe4 Rxe4 18. Bxe4 Re8 19. Re1 Bg7 20. b3 Be5 21. Bxe5 Rxe5 22. Bf3 Qd8 23. Rxe5 Nxe5 24. Bd1 Qf6 25. f4 Nd7 26. Qe3 Kf8 27. Bg4 Nb6 28. a5 Na8 29. Bc8 Qa1+ 30. Kh2 ...


5

I have seen the following. I use technique #1 though as long as one doesn't smash the pieces they are virtually the same. Pick up both your piece and their piece using the same hand, and then set yours down. (pick up my piece first, placing it on its new square, and scooping up the opponent's piece in one motion.) Pick up your piece, use it to shove theirs ...


5

According to the rules it is allowed to first remove the opponent's piece and then move your own piece to that square and then press the clock. Ideally, placing your own piece should be done directly after removing the opponent's piece. It is a bit strange to first remove the opponent piece and then sink down in deep thought. This is not considered as good ...


5

I have some records from a book published in 1969. They might have been surpassed since then, but if that is the case, I was not able to locate that information. I guess, since there is no reply after ~2 weeks, this should be better than nothing. 74 captures; legal position: r1n1n1b1/1P1P1P1P/1N1N1N2/2RnQrRq/2pKp3/3BNQbQ/k7/4Bq2 w - - 0 1 Edit: In ...


5

There is a drawing line in the Zaitsev variation of the Ruy Lopez that shows up from time to time I would think. [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 O-O 9.h3 Bb7 10.d4 Re8 11.Ng5 Rf8 12.Nf3


5

This opening is also known as the Damiano Defense and it is just bad. In the line you gave, where black plays 6... Nf6, white's best plan is to play d3 and Bg5. Black can't move the bishop because it is pinned (so the queen can't be trapped until black castles).


5

A very good and old book is Think Like a Grandmaster by the Grandmaster Alexander Kotov. He was first to put forth the idea of candidate moves. Kotov recommended looking for several moves that seemed feasible – the so-called candidate moves – and then analyzing those moves one at a time. Once you have found a good number of candidate moves, you may then ...


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