66 votes

Do you say "good game" after a game in which your opponent played poorly?

Why not just: Thanks for the game. You wanted to play a game, and your opponent gave you a game. Played well or not, you could thank him for giving you the opportunity to play.
  • 2,543
53 votes
Accepted

Is it bad etiquette to decline a draw offer when participating in a simul?

No it's not bad etiquette at all. A player being higher rated does not entitle them to automatically get the result they want, even if the position seems to indicate such a result. And in the rare ...
51 votes

Do you say "good game" after a game in which your opponent played poorly?

In short: Yes. It is a polite way to acknowledge an enjoyable game. "Good game" isn't the same thing as saying, "well-played game". Saying "good game" just means you enjoyed playing it. You could ...
  • 4,195
47 votes

What are the actions one can do against chess.com players who stop moving when they are in an objectively losing position and refuse to resign?

Assuming you also have plenty of time on your clock, make a break: have a drink, or check your mail, or pay a visit to the bathroom, or grab a book (even if it's an openings book, it doesn't count at ...
  • 13.1k
46 votes
Accepted

Game ended with a handshake

From my experience (small to medium central European Opens), offering a handshake without words is a commonly accepted form of resignation. The handshake is not part of any official rules. However, ...
  • 5,829
45 votes

How do you keep chess fun when your opponent constantly beats you?

There are many people who want to play chess with you. You can play chess online! Online sites such as chess.com and lichess.org will match you with opponents of similar rating so you should win about ...
  • 4,943
44 votes
Accepted

Why do GMs repeat moves instead of offering a draw?

A repetition giving the opponent the opportunity to claim a draw is a de facto draw offer but not a de jure draw offer. What does that mean? Well the "de facto" part means that in practice ...
  • 80.9k
41 votes
Accepted

When losing in blitz, is it rude to play to win on time?

No it's not. Your opponent spent more time to reach a winning position and you spent less time to get time advantage. It's quite fair to use your time advantage over your opponents position advantage. ...
  • 4,394
39 votes

How do you keep chess fun when your opponent constantly beats you?

There are lots of ways to play with a handicap in chess. One way is to give one player a starting material advantage, where the weaker player starts with an extra queen, or the stronger player ...
38 votes
Accepted

What are the actions one can do against chess.com players who stop moving when they are in an objectively losing position and refuse to resign?

The behavior you describe is bad sportsmanship and goes against the policies of chess.com. See the chess.com fair play policy and this blog post about the new abuse report system which includes an ...
  • 10.3k
37 votes

Why does a touched piece not have to move in online play?

I think the reason becomes more apparent when you consider why the rule is in place for OTB games - an opponent constantly moving their hands around the board and moving the pieces around can be very ...
  • 3,198
35 votes

When you are winning, is it ethical to not go for a checkmate right away?

There is no rule or law that says that you have to try and checkmate in as few moves as possible and so there is no ethical requirement either. In fact, if there are just a few pieces left on the ...
  • 80.9k
33 votes
Accepted

Is it ethical to spar against an engine when playing correspondence?

Chess.com's site rules have the following to say: You can NEVER use chess programs (Chessmaster, Fritz, etc) to analyze current ongoing games unless specifically permitted (such as a computer ...
  • 664
32 votes

In a online game, is it considered good etiquette to offer a draw when the opponent obviously misclicked?

Just to offer a different answer: No. No takebacks, no draw offers. In short time controls this is part of the game. It's the same as a blunder under pressure. I pressured the opponent on either time ...
  • 425
31 votes
Accepted

When you check someone, do you have to say "check"?

In a tournament game, you are not supposed to speak at all other than to offer a draw or adjust a piece. This includes saying check. This tends to seep into casual games among more experienced players ...
  • 7,458
31 votes

Is it bad etiquette to keep playing in a clearly hopeless position?

As a general rule, if something is not done out of malice then it's not bad etiquette in my book (especially if it's allowed in the rules). So if all you do is play on in a lost position, then I don't ...
  • 7,575
31 votes

I provided water bottle to my opponent, he drank it then lost on time due to the need of using bathroom. Is this unethical?

No, what you did is what is known as a gambit. You offered your opponent material (in this case a water bottle), which he accepted. This would be considered a blunder on his part, since although it ...
  • 411
30 votes

Is there any etiquette about how to proceed when a technical problem leads to a misplay in an online game?

That's called a mouse-slip, and it's part of playing online. Watch some of Carlsen's online play (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJlOlufG-JM) and you'll see even he mouse-slips on occasion. ...
  • 391
30 votes
Accepted

Is it improper etiquette to ask your opponent what his/her rating is before the game?

Yesterday, I played a tournament match, and at the table next to me the guy asked his opponent for his rating. “I don’t really know...” was the reply, “about 1580, I think. And yours?” “Euhm... about ...
  • 522
29 votes

In a online game, is it considered good etiquette to offer a draw when the opponent obviously misclicked?

It is perfectly good etiquette. Something similar happened in an Amber blindfold Gelfand - Kramnik: [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bg4 5. h3 Bxf3 6. Qxf3 e6 7. Nc3 Nbd7 8. Bd2 Bb4 9. ...
  • 6,516
27 votes

When you are winning, is it ethical to not go for a checkmate right away?

It depends. The USCF Code of Ethics states that the following is unethical: Deliberately failing to play at one's best in a game, in any manner inconsistent with the principles of good sportsmanship, ...
  • 15.8k
26 votes

Is it improper etiquette to ask your opponent what his/her rating is before the game?

I don't think this would be a breach in etiquette - but I think it is a somewhat dangerous thing to do for you. Chess is as much about mental fortitude as it is about "playing skill" and regardless ...
25 votes

How to minimise your opponent's fun in a game?

I play for two purposes: to win the game, or when winning is unlikely, to draw the game. to improve my chess skills, which eventually enables me to win/draw more games. These are good ...
  • 80.9k
25 votes

I provided water bottle to my opponent, he drank it then lost on time due to the need of using bathroom. Is this unethical?

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. If you placed the water there with the intent that it would cause him to use the ...
  • 15.8k
24 votes

What's the etiquette for giving checkmate on board?

This is really a question for fairly low-rated players, who tend to play things out to the bitter end. If you are reasonably strong, the only reason your opponent does not resign earlier is that he ...
  • 32.1k
23 votes

What do you do when an opponent asks for a score sheet after a game in which recording is not compulsory?

You did the right thing! I would definitely allow my opponent to take a picture of the scoresheet. There is no need to be sour, as it is very unlikely you had or will have any disadvantages from his ...
  • 3,318
23 votes

Chess etiquette: Carlsen withdrawing from the tournament

How would you rate Carlsen's actions, relative to your understanding of chess ethics? The ethical side really boils down to the question, "who is hurt by these actions". If it is a Swiss ...
  • 80.9k
21 votes

Is it bad etiquette to try to make an opponent lose on time when a position is clearly drawn?

Etiquette doesn't really come into it unless your name is Gata Kamsky (strong language warning for the link). The rule is very simple. If you want flagging to be a part of the game then play with no ...
  • 80.9k
20 votes

What are the actions one can do against chess.com players who stop moving when they are in an objectively losing position and refuse to resign?

I followed @itub's suggestion and filed a report against the particular user. Here's the answer I got from Chess.com support: [...] Certainly, this is not what we want on our site! I have sent ...
  • 1,020
20 votes

How do you keep chess fun when your opponent constantly beats you?

If you can change your attitude from this being a competition that you are "losing" to this being a tutorial, that should help a lot. Every time you play a game, you get more famailiar with lines and ...

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