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80

To get out of check, the king needs to move to a square that isn't attacked by any opposing pieces, or you need to capture/block attacking pieces such that the king is no longer under attack on its current square. Since the queen is attacking the king and both of the unblocked squares it can move to, white needs to capture the queen to get out of check here. ...


32

g3 is a better square for the Knight because it blocks White's g-pawn and so prevents White playing g3 or g4.


26

Rook at d2 is pinned by the bishop at g5 and hence the rook can not capture the black queen at c2 checkmating the white king at c1.


26

Since you are a beginner in chess first you need to understand the term pin in chess. In chess, a pin is a situation brought on by an attacking piece in which a defending piece cannot move without exposing a more valuable defending piece on its other side to capture by the attacking piece. Now, coming to your answer: Rook cannot capture the queen at f7 as ...


25

Did black just play f5 before? Then the right move is exf6 en passant, Bxf6 Rxf6 Rxf6 Qe5+ and win the piece. [FEN "2b2r1r/2k1qpb1/2p1p2p/1p1pP3/pP1P1RB1/P1N5/2P1Q1PP/5RK1 b - - 1 1"] [StartFlipped "0"] [StartPly "3"] 1... f5 2. exf6 Bxf6 3. Rxf6 Rxf6 4. Qe5+


22

There are two checkmates per orientation: [title "Mate in one"] [FEN "3b4/R3P3/2kPR1n1/P1p1n3/4K1p1/2Nr4/5p2/1b6 w KQkq - 0 1"] 1. exd8=N# and [title "Mate in one"] [FEN "3b4/R3P3/2kPR1n1/P1p1n3/4K1p1/2Nr4/5p2/1b6 b KQkq - 0 1"] 1... Rxc3# and [title "Mate in one"] [FEN "6b1/...


22

After Qa4 Black can reply ...Kf8 if you capture there's ...Qd7 (pinning your knight and regaining it later) A continuation would be 1.Qa4 Kf8 2.Nxc6 Qd7 3.Bb5 a6 4.Nxe7 axb5


20

As pointed out by Michael West, 1...Nf2 provides White the opportunity to exploit White's overwhelming advantage whereas 1...Ng3 is a forced checkmate in three (i.e., Black has a guaranteed win). Black is down too much material and has no compensation if they cannot force mate. After 1...Nf2??, Black is utterly lost. Stockfish 14+ NNUE confirms this (+9.8, ...


19

I'll have a go at saying the queen is the only piece that cannot reveal a discovered check.


19

Frankly, you overlooked a major detail...Nf6+ in reply is mate. It is important to notice your "opponent's" moves too. [FEN "r2qk2r/pp1nnp1N/4p1pQ/3pP3/4b1PP/P1B5/1PP1B3/R3KR2 b Qq - 0 1"] 1... Nf8 $4 (1... Ng8! 2. Qg7 (2. Nf6+ Qxf6 $1) 2... Qxh4+ 3. Kd2 Qxh7) 2. Nf6#


17

This is a familiar tactic I often get to use myself in another opening line. If black plays 1... Rf8, then comes 2. Bc7! Qe8 3. Nd6 Bxd6 4. Bxd6 and black loses the exchange anyway. [Title "White to move"] [FEN "r1bqr1k1/pp1nbpp1/4pn1p/2pp4/2PP1B2/P1NBPN2/1P3PPP/R2Q1RK1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Nb5 Rf8 2. Bc7! Qe8 3. Nd6 Bxd6 4. Bxd6 Chess is about patterns. Since ...


16

After 1...Rxd5 2.cxd5, both queens are attacked. They either both get captured, or (if black moves his to safety) neither is. So black lost the exchange. After 1...Qxd5 2.cxd5 Nxe2, white has lost a knight. Cxd5 seems the better capture to me on general grounds (repairs white structure a bit, makes pawn c5 weaker) but that's far less important than the full ...


16

As a chess composer, seeing most problems being called puzzles is rather frustrating. A while ago, I personally revamped the problem and puzzles tags. The problem tag says: Chess problems consist of a board position and a task. Most ask for a line of play that mates black in a set amount of moves, or a combination that results in a winning position. Many ...


15

The problem is that 5. Qxh5 isn't check, so Black has time for some back rank tricks (instead of capturing the rook on f6): [FEN "r1r4k/1p5R/3b4/4q3/B3P1Q1/1n1P3P/6P1/5R1K b - - 0 1"] 1... Kxh7 2. Rf7+ Kh6 3. Qh4+ Qh5 4. Rf6+ (4. Rh7+ Kxh7 5. Qxh5+) Kg7 5. Qxh5 Rc1+ 6. Qd1 Rxd1+ 7. Rf1 Rxf1#


15

If black plays QxR then white plays Qc3+ with mate to follow. Black's Qg7 stops the mate. With the black queen on b2 white cannot play Qc3. The Re2 move is to divert the black queen [FEN "5r1k/1pQ4p/3nB1p1/3P4/5p2/1P5P/rq5P/4R1RK w - - 0 1"] 1. Re2 Qxe2 2. Qc3+ Qe5 3. Qxe5+ Rf6 4. Qxf6#


15

I'm an FM, and my calculation process would be as follows: See that after 2.Rxg4 Qxh6 2.Rg8 Bf8, I'm clearly winning and White has no follow up. Look at White's king moves to get out of check. Immediately Kd2 and Kd3 can be discarded since they just let me play ...Rd8+ for free. Also, Kf1/Kf2 lead to the same thing after I play 2...Qf3+. So I'd just look ...


15

Evargalo's Ra1-h1 for 15 plies is not correct, since this can be done in 13: [FEN ""] 1. e3 h5 2. Qxh5 Rxh5 3. Bc4 Rxh2 4. Nf3 Rxh1+ 5. Ke2 Rxc1 6. Nc3 Rxc2 7. Rh1 However, it cannot be done in fewer than 13, making it a reasonable candidate. We can prove this as follows. Suppose White can do it in 11 plies. This means seven White pieces get off ...


13

Black is going to lose the bishop regardless. White is attacking the queen in such a way that it will have to move (or be captured), and there are no available safe squares from which it can continue to protect black's bishop. After the queen retreats, white will be free to capture the bishop with his bishop. By playing Bh3 first, black can at least generate ...


13

Rating method. On chess.com, my puzzle rating is 700 points higher than my game rating, but my chesstempo puzzle rating is only about 100 points higher than my chess.com game rating. In other words, puzzle rating on chess.com is not comparable with your game rating. I'd suggest just keep doing 10 (or more) puzzles a day and ignore whatever the gap.


13

tl;dr: Chess problems must meet defined quality standards. Chess puzzles need not. (Disclosure: I am a chess problemist.) Chess problems are all subject to rigorous conventions that are not that widely known, even among experienced chess players. Off the top of my head, the most important are: There must be a unique solution. For example, in a mate in 4 (...


13

At first glance, before concrete calculation: 1 Kh1 looks reasonably safe, the king is out of harms way for good. 1 Rf2 self-pins the rook and disjoints White's whole army with no obvious upside. Why play it over 1 Kh1? Looking a bit further, Black's queen is almost out of escape squares. However, the Rf1 is the only piece that can reasonably seal the trap ...


13

When a chess engine shows an evaluation of a position, there are typically 3 possible values, all of which are based on the engine's attempt to simulate perfect play for both sides: (1) If the engine sees a forced checkmate [meaning, when one side plays perfectly, no matter what the other side does, the winning side can checkmate], it will indicate how many ...


13

[FEN "2k1r3/pp6/n5q1/1N3p2/8/3B4/5PPP/5RK1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Bxf5 Qxf5 2. Nd6 and a cute family fork wins the queen. White is up a pawn.


12

Does it make most sense to just start playing with setting up all the pieces, or are there smaller "games" that one can/should start with? It doesn't really matter the age of the person learning to play, there is no point in starting with a full set. There is just far too much to take in and make sense of. The first thing to do is to teach them how to win!...


12

There is a similar ancient question, but this isn't a duplicate since White may move anywhere. For an upper bound, I can prove a guaranteed win for White in 5 moves. Indeed, it is reminiscent of Scholar's Mate. [FEN ""] 1. e3 null 2. Bc4 null 3. Qf3 null 4. Nh3 null 5. Ng5 With Black to move, as White has now used up their five given moves, ...


12

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 1.4 The objective of each player is to place the opponent’s king ‘under attack’ in such a way that the opponent has no legal move. 1.4.1 The player who achieves this goal is said to have ‘checkmated’ the opponent’s king and to have won the game That means that if white has a knight which is 2 normal knight moves away ...


12

The original goal of chess was to capture the opponent’s king. The idea of “checkmate” follows this: you may as well call the game won/lost once capture next turn is inevitable. So you’re checkmated if whatever you do, your king would get captured next turn — i.e. if every move you can make would leave your king still in check. In your example: There are ...


12

White is a piece up and has a completely winning position. Black could try to create some counterplay profitting from the fact that White's pieces are a bit uncoordinated right now. But realistically, any decently skilled player should be able to convert this position into a win for White. Finally, note that there's no threshold for which positions can be ...


12

You're not going to be able to do this if your attendees actually want to cheat. If you give me a position without kings, I can simply edit the chessvision analysis board by putting a king somewhere I think is reasonable and get around your system. However, if instead of preventing them from cheating, you encourage everyone to work together in teams on ...


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