30

If you want to avoid "dumb blunders" - i.e. just dropping a piece you've left hanging on the other side of the board - a simple method is to take an inventory of the position before you do anything else on each move. Checking which of your pieces are attacked and which of your pieces are hanging would be a good start. The brain will catalogue this ...


25

Seeing how Super Grandmasters capture pieces can be instructive: Garry Kasparov Capturing an adjacent piece: Capturing a distant piece: Source: YouTube Carlsen (white) vs Caruana Source: YouTube Aronian (white) vs Morozevich Source: YouTube Hikaru Nakamura (white) vs Vladimir Kramnik Source: YouTube Summary: With the exception of Kramnik, captures ...


20

What's the purpose of this question & answer? I see a lot of misuse of engines in this community. I see topics where people do opening "analysis" by copy pasting engine outputs. Even worse, I saw opening "analysis" by copy pasting in first move! Lots of beginner in this community believe that engines give best possible move in every position, because ...


15

I am on the road that starts from the "Beginner" stage, trying to leave this "town". I know and understand the rules, I also understand most of the "classic" tactics. I am able to reproduce some mating patterns (and to understand them I think). Based on your information I think I can safely assume that you would see those blunders if someone pointed them ...


14

The best practice would be to thoroughly analyze the game and also your thought process before, during and after the game. Besides, if after sincere hard efforts you still lose, it's important to have an attitude like this - “I haven't failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work” - Thomas Edison In chess, that would mean - I haven't failed, I ...


13

Don't forget to be a good sport. Smile, shake hands with the winner, and congratulate them on a good game. Then later, when you've calmed down, when you're in a more focused frame of mind, analyze your game. (Keep a notebook of the moves). 1) Look for obvious blunders - hanging pieces, bad trades 2) Look for tactical mistakes - forks, pins, etc. 3) Look ...


12

AlwaysLearningNewStuff's answer is very good but I'd like to approach the problem by giving a simple piece of advice I read from GM John Nunn's "Secrets of Practical Chess": Once, I played 100 games against Mike Cook at 10 minutes (for him) vs. 5 minutes (for me). At that time, Mike was about 2300 strength. About halfway through the series (which ...


11

As a human you are intrinsically self biased. This is hypothesized to be an evolutionary adaption and it is impossible to suppress it, or more accurately to think objectively about yourself. Until you are accurately able to gauge and control the degree to which your self-bias affects your own thinking, this will be the primary cause of blunders in your chess ...


9

Chuzhakin's System is written in 70 PDF pages. video:Chuzhakin's System intro It has 18 Rules to find so called "Hazardous Elements" - HE. Before making the move which we selected we need to check for blunders. All be blunders means that we do not see any HE or we do not see a method how to use HE (about 20 typical methods descirbed in the System). ...


9

Remarkably, I wrote a blog on this topic last night. It is available here - http://www.chess.com/blog/SamCopeland/how-to-move-a-chess-piece. To quote myself... Both Magnus and Hikaru execute their captures by first picking up their opponent's piece, then they slide that piece to the back of their hand to be held by the ring and pinky fingers within ...


9

What improves your chess is the time you spend thinking on chess and solving chess problems (either during a game or when doing exercices). As a consequence, if your concern is to make progress, a 5' blitz is better than five 1' bullets. What you will play will look more like a real chess game; at 1300-1400 I suppose you seldom drop pieces in blitz, but ...


8

Tactics cover a broad area that doesn't only concern mistakes that your opponents make. The pattern recognition faculties that you improve through tactics also help you realize the blunders that you yourself make. I don't recommend trying to change your style of play at all - I tell my students that at an early level, one of the most important things is to ...


8

Why Blunders Happen Personally, I think the biggest factor in blunders is a lack of objectivity. As humans, we have a very real, natural bias in our own favor that prevents us from evaluating ourselves, or our work, objectively. Ego, overconfidence, however you might call it--these are the things that blunders are made of, because at heart, a blunder is ...


8

After a blunder, it helps to look objectively at the position once again and forget the history. You might have been better or worse; but that doesn't matter now after the blunder. What matters is how you go from here. There could be many possibilities of salvaging a draw or even snatching a win by making the position very complicated and causing your ...


8

Here are some principles we teach beginners but grandmasters regularly break. Don't bring your queen out too early. This principle was successfully broken by Korchnoi in an important match. [FEN ""] [Event "Candidates Semifinal"] [Site "Évian-les-Bains FRA"] [Date "1977.07.16"] [Round "6"] [Result "0-1"] [White "Lev Polugaevsky"] [Black "Viktor Korchnoi"] ...


8

1) Did my opponent’s last move contain a threat? Is the threat real and something I need to respond to? Or am I able to ignore that move and continue with my plan? 2) Do my pieces have sufficient protection? Do I have a piece that is hanging? Does my opponent have an under-protected piece? 3) Is my king safe? What about the opponent’s king? Can I take ...


8

Quite possible- this would be a special case of the Tetris Effect, as would what you described with your experience with Breath of the Wild. Anecdotally, someone I knew once played a lot of chess online and experienced similar effects. About 9 hours per day were spent on chess, roughly equally divided between play and study. This person experienced such ...


7

My opinion: bad habit. Never ask for a takeback (unless it was a mouse slip online). If it's a dreadful move then learn from it. If it's only a piece or a rook then it will force you to be resourceful to try and get the game back. You'd be surprised how often this is possible with the right mental attitude. This is a very useful skill. "It happened, I ...


7

I have seen the following. I use technique #1 though as long as one doesn't smash the pieces they are virtually the same. Pick up both your piece and their piece using the same hand, and then set yours down. (pick up my piece first, placing it on its new square, and scooping up the opponent's piece in one motion.) Pick up your piece, use it to shove theirs ...


7

It really depends on what your end goal is. Themed games in a specific opening are good to get familiar with a specific opening, and get a "feel" for the positions arising in the resulting middlegames. So, if you want to learn a new opening, or are having trouble in a certain line, it could be a great way to learn an opening, coupled with studying some ...


6

I see a lot of responses recommending looking at the game from the opponent's point of view, and I can see why, ever since I started adopting this technique in my games. It really works. Until very recently, I always used to look at my game from my view, my plan, my killer tactic, my decisive blow -- which, theoretically, if implemented perfectly should be ...


6

The goal of analyzing a game is to understand what happened in the game, step by step. Following Kasparov's advice, you should analyze all your games, regardless of the final result (loss, draw or win). The point is that it is tempting to only analyze your losses, because you think that these are the games that reveal your weak spots. While in reality, your ...


6

I have played tennis and chess both quite seriously for several years and my preparation towards a game when it comes to food, is basically the same. I try to eat around 4 hours before the game, some pasta with a light sauce or no sauce at all, avoid red meats 24 hours prior to the game and rink only water the day of the game. If I am to start in the morning ...


6

A great practice routine if you have a willing partner is to take a position from an opening you wish to study and play a series of blitz games from both sides. For example, when I was younger me and my chess buds would play a bunch of blitz games from B63, Sicilian Richter-Rauzer position: e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 ...


5

All analysis (as Gaul) is divided into three parts: During and immediately after the game Annotation after the game Computer engine checking Step one has been covered fairly well by the above posters, but to reiterate: As you write the moves, mark moves which took you a long time to make If you have space/time write down any variations you are considering ...


5

According to the rules it is allowed to first remove the opponent's piece and then move your own piece to that square and then press the clock. Ideally, placing your own piece should be done directly after removing the opponent's piece. It is a bit strange to first remove the opponent piece and then sink down in deep thought. This is not considered as good ...


5

I'd like to add that an "incremental learning" approach is key to not burning out on opening study. It's astonishing so many players choose to drink from a fire hydrant rather than sip ... and then forget/confuse their move orders. Then get angry at their pet line and rationalize that as a perfect time to switch openings. Again ... and again. I suffered ...


5

Personally I have noticed many of my worst blunders seem to come from trying to play on a square I don't control. Basically I'll get so focused on trying to attack a particular target that I will hang a piece trying to get at it. If I see myself starting to do that, I'll stare at the square I'm likely to blunder on and tell myself "NO" (not out loud unless ...


5

always ask yourself what is your opponent trying to achieve with his last move. make your move in your head without submitting it, then find the best reply for your opponent (if he can do something serious, undo your move and try to stop it, if it is too late to stop it, then consider resigning). This will greatly cut down the direct blunders. However, as ...


5

Attack those pawns on side where is no rook. Once he makes a hole, get your queen on his backs. This way you will be able to grab like 2~ I'd say. Then run with a pawn on a free file. 1. e3/e4 - Nc6 2. Qh5-h6 3. Qg4-g6 4. Qf4-h5 5. Qh6 just an example


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