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51

I believe that the game you speak of is the extremely famous Lasker-Thomas match in which Lasker forces Black to accept his queen "sacrifice" on move 11. It is followed by a king hunt in which Black's king is forced to the last rank by White, who then finishes the game with the king giving a discovered check from the unmoved a8 rook. The game is ...


37

Although I agree that chess is 90% tactics when actually playing at the board, it really depends on where you are strenght-wise as to how much time you spend on tactics. By the way, when they use the word "tactics" there, I would say "tactics and calculation". When you are beginning, I firmly believe that spending 90% of your time on tactics will be the ...


35

The material balance is only temporary. After White goes c4, Black will lose a piece. If Qf5, White has f3 trapping the bishop. All alternatives to Qf5 leave a piece unprotected (for instance c4 Nxc4 Bxe4 Qxe4 Qxc4 +-) [Event "Chess Calculation: Chapter 1"] [Site "https://lichess.org/study/VFtoodiL/uG0A42Q9"] [Date "2021.09.12"] ...


31

Oh sure, here are two examples (annotated): This is a neat puzzle from the chess.com tactics, with white to play! [title "White to play!"] [fen "1q6/2b2ppb/4p1k1/7p/2Np1p1P/3P1Q2/6PK/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Ne5+ Bxe5 {black has to take else white either checkmates or wins the queen.} 2.Qg3+ fxg3+ {Pawn takes queen is forced else white checkmates} 3.Kh3 {and ...


27

Carlsen crushed it, made almost no mistakes whatsoever in rapid. It is as if he was playing at classical time controls. Chess is about not making mistakes. If your opponent doesn't make mistakes then you're only going to get a draw even if you play like an engine. He did play good moves as well. Example on move 37 the position is a draw but he gave himself ...


27

The main idea is to try to trap the c2-bishop. After h4 White is threatening to play Rc1 and black can't save the bishop. That's why black should play ...h5 giving their bishop a retreat square. Note that if h4 h6, then there is Bxh6 and c2 is hanging.


26

As you mentioned, playing the man can mean several different things, but before I answer I want to say that no one can become a better player by only playing the man - objectivity is the number 1 priority. Many top-level GMs do play the man and the most notable example I can give is the Kasparov-Kramnik match in 2000. Kramnik knew that Kasparov disliked ...


22

It is winning for white. You can enter all positions of six pieces into a tablebase, like this online one. It's mate in at most 39 moves, for example: [FEN "4N1K1/5P2/6k1/8/6n1/8/N7/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.f8=N+ Kf5 2.Kg7 Ke4 3.Nb4 Kd4 4.Kf7 Kc5 5.Na6 Kd4 6.Nac7 Ne5 7.Kf6 Nc4 8.Ke6 Na5 9.Nd6 Nc4 10.Nf5 Kd3 11.Nd5 Na5 12.Nf6 Nc4 13.N8d7 Kd2 14.Nd5 Ke2 15....


22

It's a discovered attack with check (the rook attacking the queen is the discovered attack, the check is the discovering move). As the discovering move is also an attack, this gives rise to a double attack. The check must be answered, so the queen takes the knight even though it is protected. This could also be considered a desperado from White's point of ...


21

It's all Sun Tzu; If the player is a tactician, play positional. If the player is positional, play tactical. If the guy is booked up in a line -- don't play into it unless you have a surprise... It is not about off the board antics. Is the guy out of form or a little sick? Then make the game long and complicated... Then as SubhanKhan mentioned: at the ...


21

Look at your own games, check what caused you to get in bad positions or maybe even to lose, and work on that. It's not rocket science. If you never get close to endgames, improving them is going to have marginal effect. If you regularly get endgames but don't know what to do in them, you need to work on endgames. If you fail to win because you didn't go to ...


20

Losing a queen early on without any compensation or counterplay means almost certain defeat against anybody except for absolute beginners. There is a certain "point system" which can be used to evaluate a position: Basically you assign points to certain aspects of the position, like material, piece activity, king safety, space advantage, etc. Adding all ...


19

Frankly, you overlooked a major detail...Nf6+ in reply is mate. It is important to notice your "opponent's" moves too. [FEN "r2qk2r/pp1nnp1N/4p1pQ/3pP3/4b1PP/P1B5/1PP1B3/R3KR2 b Qq - 0 1"] 1... Nf8 $4 (1... Ng8! 2. Qg7 (2. Nf6+ Qxf6 $1) 2... Qxh4+ 3. Kd2 Qxh7) 2. Nf6#


18

In this position, the material imbalance pretty much tells the whole story, as a queen and two pawns against two knights is, barring significant positional compensation, an overwhelming material advantage. And in this case, the non-material positional considerations only serve to emphasize Black's advantage: the white king is exposed, and his pieces are not ...


18

There's another famous quote you need to pair with "Chess is 90% tactics." Spielmann was reported to remark, after hearing one too many people exclaiming about an Alekhine combination, "I could find those combinations myself, just as easily, if I had his positions. But I never get those positions!" And that's the rub. The game-winning tactics you see in the ...


17

As T.S. Eliot said, "There is no method but to be very intelligent." If the opponent is smart enough to avoid the known short mates and understands basic opening strategy, you'll just have to outplay them. That said, in my experience, new players often miss forks, discovered attacks, and moves that theoretically place a piece under attack, but where the ...


17

You say: "Do the same puzzles over and over? I'm worried that once I've memorised a puzzle, then I'm not doing so much calculation as memory retrieval." Memory retrieval is exactly what you should be doing! The brain improves recall not by repeated input, but by repeated output. This is why reviewing notes is a terrible way to study for a test, and why ...


17

It sounds like you're a beginner. As such, you should be focusing more on tactics than openings. First, just because they play a move that's not in your book, doesn't mean it's "wrong". It may be an older line that's not in modern opening books, or just not in the books you have. That being said, to answer your question, it depends on the opening. In a ...


17

[FEN "R5k1/5ppp/8/2r5/1b6/8/5PPP/6K1 b - - 0 1"] 1... Rc8 2. Rxc8+ Bf8 This is an example of what Tim Krabbé calls an 'unguarded guard' - a linepiece checks, and a piece interposes on an unguarded square. That page mentions Topalov - Polgar, Novgorod 1996 (see below); while not a true back rank mate, it comes close. Here are some endgame studies with other ...


17

Now is this really the way to play chess? Well, it is certainly a way to play chess. It's the way Aryan Tari chose to play Magnus Carlsen in the Altibox Norway tournament a couple of days ago. Swap as many pieces off as you can, get to a more or less equal endgame, maybe have to survive a bit of pressure then shake hands for a draw. It didn't work out that ...


16

my feeling is that Caruana lost the game, more than Carlsen won it. Whenever two players play a game without making any errors the result is a draw. Most games have lots of errors and it is usually the player who makes the last error who loses. As far as I can tell, Carlsen didn't make any winning!! or distinctly good moves Not true. Carlsen made many ...


16

1...Qb2 is not a legal move because black is in check; 1...Rc6 blocks the check. Another alternative to block the check is 1...Qc6, but that would drop the knight on d3. [FEN "k1r4r/p6p/5p2/3Q4/1R5P/PPqn4/3N1P2/1K1R4 b - - 1 1"] 1... Rc6 (1... Qc6 2. Qxd3)


15

Solving alot of tactic puzzles is a fantastic way to improve for a beginner. One of the reasons for my improvement was the constant solving of tactics on chess.com's tactics trainer feature, which basically made me shed my beginner skins, since tactics almost always play a decisive role in the games of beginners. However, you must also play many normal ...


15

The problem is that 5. Qxh5 isn't check, so Black has time for some back rank tricks (instead of capturing the rook on f6): [FEN "r1r4k/1p5R/3b4/4q3/B3P1Q1/1n1P3P/6P1/5R1K b - - 0 1"] 1... Kxh7 2. Rf7+ Kh6 3. Qh4+ Qh5 4. Rf6+ (4. Rh7+ Kxh7 5. Qxh5+) Kg7 5. Qxh5 Rc1+ 6. Qd1 Rxd1+ 7. Rf1 Rxf1#


15

I'm an FM, and my calculation process would be as follows: See that after 2.Rxg4 Qxh6 2.Rg8 Bf8, I'm clearly winning and White has no follow up. Look at White's king moves to get out of check. Immediately Kd2 and Kd3 can be discarded since they just let me play ...Rd8+ for free. Also, Kf1/Kf2 lead to the same thing after I play 2...Qf3+. So I'd just look ...


15

A typical way to do it is to treat puzzles the same as players and rate them based on whether they "win/lose" and the rating of the "opponent" ChessTempo has a nice explanation here copied below: The rating system is inspired by an idea implemented at the Chess Tactics Server. CTS treats both problem solvers and the problems as opponents with their ...


15

It's not uncommon that a tactical sequence makes use of more than one general pattern. Here, we have a double attack where one of these attacks is a discovered one (the rook on the queen) and the other is a decoy (the knight check lures the queen to a square where it will be undefended).


14

Your description of the computer's suggestions doesn't quite match the position, but if you mean the computer suggests Nxe5, that is correct, as Bxd1 leads to a variation of Legal's Mate. Nxe5 Bxd1 Bxf7+ Ke7 Nd5# If, instead, Nxe5 dxe5 Qxg4 and white has won a pawn, and has a big lead in development.


14

When you move one rook to the center, the other rook, obviously, cannot cross it. If you play Rfd1, you cannot then play Rae1. And if you play Rad1, you cannot then play Rfc1. So, part of this decision is planning ahead and thinking about which other file you are likely to want a rook on. Relatedly, if you play a move like Rae1, you are trapping your f-rook,...


14

Is there something wrong with my approach? Yes. This is how I am playing nowadays and can beat ~1500 player 50% of time( rest is due to tactical errors) I mean i do wanna improve my tactical skill but my decision is that once i am able to beat a 1500 player 100% of the time,I will start playing tactical chess. If I am reading this correctly, against 1500 ...


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