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18

I think that Black is doomed after Qh6 but the engines do not even recommend it as a correct move. Is there something I am missing here? Yes. The only reason black can't take your queen on h6 is because the g7 pawn is pinned by your rook on g3. If black could take that (even losing the queen to do so) with tempo (i.e. so you don't have time to play Qxh7#) ...


3

A chess engine's depth used to denote how many half moves it calculates ahead (roughly speaking), however this has long not been true anymore. Traditionally you would search one depth at a time, so first 1 ply deep, then 2 plies deep, then 3 and so on, each iteration increasing the depth by one ply. Modern engines however have various search heuristics which ...


3

The theory is that if your opponent could make two consecutive moves and not improve his position, you must have an overwhelming advantage. If you advantage is so great, there's no need to examine other lines, and the search can end.


3

I actually did the experiment and will answer now. Three main factors go into the evaluation (as king safety doesn't play the slightest role): material, space, and movability. The effect of space is rather high at +1.4. [FEN "4k3/p1p1p1p1/P1P1P1P1/8/8/8/8/4K3 w - - 0 1"] Any useless doubled pawn is about +0.7, giving +4.2. [FEN "4k3/p1p1p1p1/...


3

Q: How long is the longest forced checkmate in chess? A: We will probably never know, but a naive extrapolation from known data might suggest about 18 billion moves. 50/75 move-rules don't apply Firstly, let's definitively remove one distraction: 50-moves (or 75-moves). The Codex for Chess Problem Compositions states: Footnote 12. Presently the rules ...


3

Here you can find a mate in 555 moves by Lutz Neweklowsky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70FmRGd4qqU&ab_channel=LutzNeweklowsky In this kind of chesscompositions we don't have a 50-move-rule. Kind regards, Lutz Neweklowsky


2

Lichess.org has a bot API and allows bot accounts to play rated games against human players. See this article.


2

You could try PGN ChessBook Which is a free app that has some good automatic blunder-check / game-annotation features. It can find blunders, then automatically annotate the game by inserting variations and (optionally) adding comments to the blunder moves, which can then be printed out, as described in this video How to find and print out game blunders using ...


2

https://github.com/official-stockfish/Stockfish. Check UCI_LimitStrength. One of the UCI options.


2

Just my opinion. The best move is the one with the best evaluation, with the exception of the "computer moves" which only delay the real threat for a move. A brilliant move is not only good but has a surprise value. A correct sacrifice easily qualifies, but a move with an unusual (and correct plan do tend to be brilliant. There are two examples: ...


2

Just my opinion. Watch the GMs, epically Nakamura, play very unusual openings, odds games, and other stunts against the "mere" 2600s, and you'll find that they still win from a bad position. AlphaZero has shown that it can sacrifice several pawns against the highest rated chess engine. (Game Changer: AlphaZero's Groundbreaking Chess Strategies ...


1

As of right now, the "equal odds" between a GM and an engine is about two pawns. I believe Hikaru Nakamura made that comment at some point in this match (I did not watch the entire video). For another perspective, this is what happened when GM David Smerdon played against Komodo with knight odds (GM Smerdon won 4-1). Note that two pawn odds (White ...


1

I find watching the latest generation of self-taught AIs play is incredibly exciting - and of course they are relatively opaque as is much of AI these days. Maybe openings turn out to be relatively tractable in that there are not so many fundamentally sensible options, given the transpositions which are possible. A player who begins with a few garbage moves ...


1

It's been a long time since I programmed anything, so I may be wrong. Pondering, like in the comment, allows the computer to think on your time. It basically switches sides and maintains a principle variation (PV search) (although I've seen some engines which maintain 3 PV searches) of what it considers to be the best line. When you make your move, if it's ...


1

No, there are not. Engine chess does not have a governing body to award titles. There usually are not any prizes aside from bragging rights, either.


1

The number of games doesn't really effect improvement. Let's say that in the 500th game that is discovers the common Nf7 fork. This knowledge isn't useful until it plays enough games to discover that the rook is worth mort than a knight. Both pieces of information is needed, plus and ability to associate them, to understand that the fork is a positive play....


1

It seems this is happening because for endgame positions, Stockfish uses its handcrafted eval function. This is why Stockfish still has a contempt setting, since it's unclear how to implement contempt with NNUE eval, but contempt is still applicable whenever Stockfish uses its handcrafted eval. The handcrafted eval can flatline, therefore Stockfish can ...


1

The chessboard editor at https://www.apronus.com/chess/pgnviewer/ has two modes selected by radio buttons: "position setup" and "legal moves only". In position setup you can do anything on the board including adding or removing chessmen.


1

I have found the problem: my board representation was different and while my ranks are also from 0-7, but they are counted from the black side, while in the polyglot encoding, they are counted from the white side (which makes sense). So I had to invert my ranks like so: unsigned short fromFile = (moveKey>>6)&7, fromRank = ...


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