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9

Sorry, computer engines are not designed to think like a human. It's a machine, it's written to play strong chess. There is no intelligence in there to think like that. The "good moves" you mentioned were actually bad moves at Stockfish's level.


7

What about? The eval command will do what you want. However, it's not useful for chess learning. They are just static evaluations. What you're after is more like extracting features from the analysis. Stockfish doesn't have it.


7

Yes, of course it's possible. I've done it a lot professionally. However, there is no tool that just takes a PGN chess game and convert it into images. You will need to do some programming, not very hard. Here is a link on how one can generate machine learning data set on chess. You should be able to reuse the code. I highlighted the part that will relate ...


5

it doesn't seem to find any good moves that I've made You are expecting too much is the real issue here, so don't be so hard on yourself. First, and I do not say this to be mean, but your level of play is going to contain mostly bad moves, but they look that much worse because you are being evaluated by a silicon beast. Keep in mind that Stockfish is FAR ...


4

Is there any way to find good moves that I made, rather than just non-mistakes? Actually, in most cases, it's doing this already. The reason your moves aren't showing up is probably that they're not actually good moves! the evaluation shows I made a suboptimal move even though against this particular opponent it resulted in me winning a piece The ...


3

If you go to this page and enter a position, you can click the links on the left (or the "table" and "graph" tabs on the top) to see the sub-scores for Stockfish. Note that this is a static evaluation that does not look ahead. If you want to use it, you should look at the line Stockfish gives you, and enter the position at the end of that line.


3

No. Your assumption is based on searching everything up to depth D, but no modern chess engine would do that. It's complicated to explain, but fair to assume only some subtrees up to depth D are explored. The other trees got "cut" off for various reasons, most likely they are not good. Chess programming is all about skipping the search tree accurately. The ...


3

Stockfish is a free project, people don't work for financial returns. Unfortunately, that would mean your request might never be honoured. As a programmer with technical skills, you are expected to compile the code yourself. Sorry, this is how a free open source project work. They give you the code for free, so you just have to do some works.


2

If after making a move the engine’s score for the position is virtually unchanged - it’s good move!


2

Run Stockfish in multi-PV mode. This makes Stockfish suggest multiple moves. If the move you chose is preferred by Stockfish to others, then it's a "good move".


1

Computing magics at statup is fine because it's done only once and not very slow. https://github.com/official-stockfish/Stockfish/blob/master/src/bitboard.cpp // init_magics() computes all rook and bishop attacks at startup. Magic // bitboards are used to look up attacks of sliding pieces. As a reference see // www.chessprogramming.org/Magic_Bitboards. ...


1

In addition to the reasons why you are not doing great after g5, it seems to me that there is no urgency to trap the bishop immediately. If you start with Bg4, how can white keep their bishop safe from a future g5? There is nowhere for it to go, and if they try to create an escape route with e4 then dxe4 wins the knight instead. So g5 is still a possibility ...


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