49

I believe that the game you speak of is the extremely famousLasker-Thomas match in which Lasker forces Black to accept his queen "sacrifice" on move 11. It followed by a king hunt in which Black's king is forced to the last rank by White, who then finishes the game with the king giving a discovered check from the unmoved a8 rook. The game is ...


29

This does sound like the famous game between Edward Lasker (not the world champ) and George Alan Thomas. [FEN ""] [Event "Casual game"] [Site "London ENG"] [Date "1912.10.29"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Edward Lasker"] [Black "George Alan Thomas"] 1. d4 e6 2. Nf3 f5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 6. e4 fxe4 7. Nxe4 b6 8. Ne5 O-O 9. Bd3 Bb7 10. Qh5 Qe7 11. ...


27

This is kind of out there (virtually nobody plays it as white and even fewer allow it as black) but there is a rather crazy queen sacrifice line in the Grand Prix: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 "] 1.e4 c5 2.f4 d5 3.Nf3 dxe4 4.Ng5 Nf6 5.Bc4 Bg4!? 6.Bxf7+ Kd7 7.Qxg4+ Nxg4 8.Be6+ Kc6 9.Bxg4 5...Bg4!? by black is quite rare and ...


23

A commonly known knight sacrifice by white is the Fried Liver Attack: [FEN ""] [ECO "C57"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5?! (5... Na5 {The main line.} 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 {Black has compensation in form of initiative for the pawn.}) 6. Nxf7!? (6. d4 {The Lolli variation.}) Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6 8. Nc3 White has a strong attack against ...


22

The Cochrane Gambit: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nxf7 This is relatively sound gambit, Topalov has played it against Kramnik. The Traxler Gambit: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 Bc5 5. Nxf7 Bxf2 6. Kf1 Qe7 7. Nxh8 White does have an option of taking on f7 with the bishiop 5. Bxf7 which leads to only a pawn sacrifice and less ...


20

The 'Halloween Gambit' or 'Müller-Schulze Gambit' is a knight gambit in the (often characterized as dull) Four Knights Game: [FEN ""] [White "Blokje"] [Black "Platypussy"] [StartPly "7"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Nc6 6.d5 Ne5 7.f4 Ng6 8.e5 Ng8 9.Bd3 Bb4 10.O-O Bxc3 11.bxc3 d6 12.e6 fxe6 13.dxe6 Nf6 14.g4 O-O 15.g5 Ne8 16.f5 Ne5 17....


16

https://www.chess.com/article/view/how-to-avoid-blunders-part-two In one of his books GM Alexander Kotov even coined a term "Dizziness due to success" which describes Chigorin's blunder that we just witnessed pretty accurately. Kotov even tells his own story. He was playing a game and achieved a completely winning position. His opponent lost any ...


15

There are some possibilities that I can think of: His 8 year old sister, dog, neighbor, etc suggested some of these 'great moves' He was trying to handicap himself to make it more challenging He tried something new or crazy, possibly to end the game quickly (e.g sacrificing his own pieces to expose your king or free his pieces) Maybe he tried a chess gambit,...


15

The Perenyi Gambit is an important theoretical variation that has been favored by GMs like J.Polgar or A.Shirov. White sacrifices at least one piece, and often two: [FEN ""] [ECO "C57"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e6 7. g4!? e5 8. Nf5 g6 9. g5 (9.Bg2) gxf5 10. exf5 d5 11. Qf3 d4 See, for instance, Polgar-Anand, 1999. Or this ...


14

I will assume here that you are talking about sacrificing pieces and not just pawns, which require less compensation. For a sacrifice to work out you generally need to either 1) checkmate the opposing king, or 2) eventually gain the material back. There are other scenarios, but they're less common and I will ignore them here. Often goal 2 occurs because ...


12

Sacrifices have the following goals: exposing the king: for example after your opponent castled, sacrificing the bishop to take the pawn diagonally to the king. cut the escape of the king: this one is hard to explain, but basically after the sacrifice, if the opponent recaptures, the king can no longer occupy this square. Note that this can also happen even ...


12

Not sure if this is considered a gambit, but one of the lines of the Steinitz variation of the Caro Kann defense involves white sacrificing a knight: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 "] [Event "IBM Man-Machine, New York USA"] [Site "New York, NY USA"] [Date "1997.05.??"] [Round "6"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Deep Blue"] [Black "...


10

I can find the actual game neither in my database nor at, say, chessgames.com. However, the position appears as puzzle 210 -- with the apt description "Running around like a squirrel in a cage" -- in the book 1000 Checkmate Combinations by Victor Henkin, and there it is attributed to a game Aleksandrov-Zaitsev 1974.


10

My favourite is this one, it has a nice anecdote attached to it, too. Supposedly, in the situation shown on the board, due to his overwhelming advantage, the white player has kindly asked his rival on which square he would like to receive the checkmate. The black player responded: [White "Edward Lasker"] [Black "George Alan Thomas"] [FEN "rn3rk1/pbppq1pp/...


10

As was stated in the answer to this post made by D M, one idea of capturing in this manner is to open up the g-file for white's rooks to attack black's king. In the game this proved to be a very potent idea, and in general it's a good idea to open up lines for one's rooks against the enemy king if one intends to attack it. But there is another point to ...


10

What you are looking for is called "attraction". That is, you attract a piece to a specific square. One of the most famous types of attraction is seen in this example: [FEN "r1b2rk1/pp2pp1p/1qp3p1/4Q3/1n1N4/1P6/PBP2PPP/R4RK1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qg7+ Kxg7 2. Nf5+ Kg8 3. Nh6# Here is a nice link with another example. This is also exactly a deflection since ...


10

First, I don't think that there is any doubt that black has significant compensation, but clearly, black is still trying to hold this, not win it when talking two computers playing each other. I believe that between two humans, I would probably prefer black. If you have an eval that says +.63 for white, but black is down two pawns, you have to realize that ...


9

I almost always play 4. d4 instead of 4. d3, to keep that line open for the bishop, and open up the game a bit as well. That's not to say d3 isn't ok. Without computer analysis: That said, once they make the mistake of sacrificing that knight, you should quickly play Be3 to defend against them double attacking your pinned knight. Once that is accomplished, ...


9

What you describe would not be a sacrifice; it would be an exchange - bishop for bishop. And yes, if your bishop is bad (or generally unlikely to enter play without some time-consuming work), then it is a good idea to exchange, especially if your opponent's bishop is well-situated. To address sacrificing - you should only sacrifice material if you gain a ...


9

It looks like your opponent underestimated you. He began by playing an inferior opening, sacrificing a pawn to get two "free" bishops. You neutralized his advantage by "opposing" bishops on his diagonals, eventually exchanging them with a pawn up. Then he tried to recoup by O-O-O, sacrificing another pawn. Given an initial advantage, you played steady, ...


9

Sorry it is not an answer to the original question. It is supposed to be a comment to StudetT's answer - definitely correct one - but is too long to fit the comment format. Just a bit of chess history. Dizziness due to success was not coined by Kotov. It is a title a Pravda editorial, signed by Stalin (I have no idea who actually wrote it), published in ...


9

A suggestion I have is to start playing gambits, and high-risk-high-reward openings. For example, playing the King's Gambit as White forces you to utilize any initiative you are given. Playing the KID as Black will force you to sacrifice pieces now and then to win istead of losing. Basically what you need to do is to start appreciating initiative by ...


9

Something which might help here is Chess Query Language. Just like SQL does for relational databases, CQL can search in a database of chess games for positions/games which match certain criteria. I must say I have never used it myself, but it seems to be capable of amazing things, far more complex than what you're looking for. Here is an old article showing ...


9

You say your opponent had a strong attack against your king and you had to "sacrifice" your rook for two minor pieces and went on to lose. I think you have it the wrong way round. It sounds like your opponent had a strong attack against your king and sacrificed two minor pieces for your rook, your one active piece by the sound of it. In general a rook and ...


8

Given that you are a piece up with a dominating position, exchanging the bishops isn't a problem at all. Note, that it is just an exchange, not a sacrifice. You could have played 19.Bc7 instead, in that case black has to react 19…Ra8 or he will lose even more material (for example 19…Rb7 20.Rxc8 Kd7 21. Rxf8 with three pieces for a rook, which is a bit much ...


8

The sacrifice is quite dubious. Besides the answers with 10.Nxe5, 10. Rxe5 is simply two knights for a rook and there is no attack for Black.


8

The Frankenstein-Dracula variation of the Vienna game features a Rook sacrifice by Black (effectively an exchange sacrifice however, since the Knight will not escape). [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 Impressively, this variation seems to favour Black.


7

Certainly some of the suggestions listed above are possible, but I believe he played below his best and just lost. I will explain why I think so. First, I believe you played one of those games with 3 days per move (or similar) online. Am I right? I have played in those places and sometimes you just start too many games. So while you played maybe one ...


7

I ran this through Stockfish at 15 minutes per move. What I have found is that the sacrifice is sound and wins. But for a 'won' game, it is about the hardest road I have ever seen. The evaluation of the position is less than a pawn advantage for White up through move 25 or so. The sacrifice leads to opportunities for White, but both sides are walking the ...


7

This is a very long question. And you can use Stockfish to check tactical solutions. Solutions of all positions except the 5th ends with mate or huge material gain. In position 5, Black plays a positional sacrifice, to turn that cramped position into a nice attacking one. Position 1 - Black to play, why Rh2? [FEN "1r2k2r/p4pp1/2n1p3/q2pP1N1/3P1PB1/1Pb5/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible