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50

In general, a chess set has the king as the tallest piece, followed by queen, bishop, knight, rook and pawn in that order. Notice in the starting position how the piece height decreases smoothly from the centre to the edge. (Also, when buying a chess set, usually the height of the king is given as a guide to the size of the chessmen.) Thus I would say the ...


46

The official FIDE laws of chess do not know about a queen check. Announcing a "queen check“ might even be considered a case of "to distract or annoy the opponent“ (11.5). Even announcing a "king check“ is not recommended. That’s for tournament chess. In informal games, it is not unusual in some groups to announce a check and a "queen ...


42

There is no need for an early queen trade. Just develop your pieces, if possible by attacking the queen. Here is an example from the Wayward Queen Attack also known as Patzer Opening. [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Ne2 Bg7 6. Nbc3 O-O 7. d3 d6 2.Qh5 threatens to take e5, so we defend it by developing a piece: Nc6 (d6 is also possible)...


33

Trying to encourage a queen trade in this sort of situation is usually the wrong strategy. The exaggerated version of the answer is this. Your opponent has just proved that they don't know how to use their queen properly. Instead of saying, "That's OK. I'll trade off the queens so this isn't a problem for you", you should say "I'll keep exploiting this ...


32

The position given by Akavall is indeed a draw by perpetual, but it's a bit difficult to see because White has many different options at some moves. They can even choose to sacrifice the h2 queen, which effectively ends the perpetual (but it's still a draw). A position where this is much easier to see is the following one: [FEN "5k2/8/8/8/8/5q2/7Q/6QK w ...


29

No. Some people think it is polite to say 'gardez' to alert a player that the Q can be taken. But no rule says you have to say check nor gardez and in serious games with good players it is not done. This gardez for Qs is just a very informal rule amongst some low level players that I have not seen in actual use for 60 years but have read about as being more ...


25

As noted in the first comment to your question, there are certainly a lot of draws. To narrow it down to reasonable games that were wins, I searched the Mega 2019 Database for games with both players above 2500, and wins with moves between 4-10. It returned 131 games. Of those games, whether due to the remaining moves simply not being transmitted, someone ...


25

The simple and obvious answer is that it all depends on the position of black's pawns and king. In general the further up the board the pawns the better for black provided the king is in contact with the pawns, preferably in front of them. Worth pointing out that the position you give is winning for white because the pawns aren't far enough forward. From ...


23

It is a fairly short and simple explanation: They can combine to attack any square, not just squares on one color. As part of that they can also shift the attack better from one square to another.


22

There are several key positions from which it is easy to memorize the win. The basic idea is to drive the opposing king to the edge of the board, and then to the corner, where you can force the rook to separate from the king. [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "King and Queen"] [Black "King and Rook"] [Result "*"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN ...


21

It should be easily possible to get 18 queens. If white captures four enemy pieces, that's enough to get doubled pawns on four files (a, c, e and g, for instance). And black captures four times to get his pawns on the b, d, f and h files. Then they can all advance and promote, and it should be easy to avoid mate by storing them all in some corner. Here, ...


21

INTRODUCTORY NOTE: Examples and instructions are taken from the book: Y.Averbakh - Comprehensive Chess Endings Volume 3. In many cases I felt no need to "reinvent the wheel" so I quoted the above authors. Those parts will be marked with apostrophes "", like this: "This is a quoted text". Without further delay let us tackle this endgame: "In endings of ...


21

At first glance, the taller piece with skinnier top would appear to be the King while the shorter, rounder piece would appear to be the Queen. There are a few reasons why this would appear to be the case. The King often has a cross on top and the taller piece with the spike appears to more closely resemble that than the shorter piece, and in some sets the ...


20

Losing a queen early on without any compensation or counterplay means almost certain defeat against anybody except for absolute beginners. There is a certain "point system" which can be used to evaluate a position: Basically you assign points to certain aspects of the position, like material, piece activity, king safety, space advantage, etc. Adding all ...


19

Practically speaking, if the king were any more powerful, checkmate or capture would be impossible. The Queen originated as the Advisor. The Advisor was powerful, but not as powerful as the modern Queen, however. Why did the Advisor become the Queen? Having more than one Queen per side would debase the game, and there are two each of the other pieces. ...


19

There is not opening that usually paves the way for a queen trade. There are plenty of specific lines that allow for it, but it takes cooperation from your opponent. The first line that comes to mind is hugely popular at the GM level: The Berlin in the Ruy Lopez. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. ...


18

The main issue with developing your queen early is that it is a very valuable piece, so pretty much any time your opponent threatens to take it, he is threatening to win material. (Contrast with developing your knights, say; if your opponent threatens to take it, unless he's threatening to take with a pawn, he is often just really offering an equal exchange.)...


16

First of all, despite the stigma attached to early queen moves Nakamura has played the white side of 1) e4 e5 2) Qh5 several times in top level play, so it is a move you should treat with respect. The best approach is probably to play moves like 2) Nc6 to protect the e pawn, 3) g6 to kick away the queen, then Nf6, Bg7, castles to get your king safe. Then if ...


16

One of the ways I teach kids how knights move is to put the queen and the knight on the same square. The knight can go to the nearest squares that the queen can't go to. It is this unique complimentary nature of the two pieces which means that they form such a potent combination. With queen plus any other piece this is missing and there is a duplication of ...


15

Here is another decisive game where neither queen moved: [FEN ""] [Event "36th Olympiad"] [Site "Calvia ESP"] [Date "2004.10.17"] [EventDate "2004.10.15"] [Round "2"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Alexander Morozevich"] [Black "Viktor Korchnoi"] [ECO "C77"] [WhiteElo "2758"] [BlackElo "2601"] [PlyCount "25"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 b5 6. ...


14

Solution by Friedrich Burchard & Friedrich Hariuc (1976) in 96 Half-moves [FEN ""] 1.e4 f5 2.e5 Nf6 3.exf6 e5 4.g4 e4 5.Ne2 e3 6.Ng3 e2 7.h4 f4 8.h5 fxg3 9.h6 g5 10.Rh4 gxh4 11.g5 g2 12.g6 Bg7 13.hxg7 g1=Q 14.f4 h3 15.f5 h2 16.b4 a5 17.b5 a4 18.b6 a3 19.Bb2 Ra7 20.bxa7 axb2 21.a4 b5 22.a5 b4 23.a6 b3 24.c4 h1=Q 25.c5 h5 26.c6 Bb7 27.cxb7 c5 28.d4 c4 29....


14

Your description of the computer's suggestions doesn't quite match the position, but if you mean the computer suggests Nxe5, that is correct, as Bxd1 leads to a variation of Legal's Mate. Nxe5 Bxd1 Bxf7+ Ke7 Nd5# If, instead, Nxe5 dxe5 Qxg4 and white has won a pawn, and has a big lead in development.


14

I just happened to be reviewing the 2013 World Championship match a few days ago and asked myself a similar question because in round 9 Carlsen won without moving his queen or bishop. Anand vs Carlsen - Round 9: [FEN ""] [Event "Anand - Carlsen World Championship Match"] [Site "Chennai IND"] [Date "2013.11.21"] [...


14

John Watson's "Secrets of Modern Chess Strategy" contains a section titled "Folklore or Reality? Queens and Knights" John lists some folks that say Queen and Knight are better Capablanca Shirov Silman And refers to Steve Meyer's book "Bishop vs Knights" which also says the Queen + Knight is better. I am currently playing through "Karpov move by move" ...


13

The problem is that 5. Qxh5 isn't check, so Black has time for some back rank tricks (instead of capturing the rook on f6): [FEN "r1r4k/1p5R/3b4/4q3/B3P1Q1/1n1P3P/6P1/5R1K b - - 0 1"] 1... Kxh7 2. Rf7+ Kh6 3. Qh4+ Qh5 4. Rf6+ (4. Rh7+ Kxh7 5. Qxh5+) Kg7 5. Qxh5 Rc1+ 6. Qd1 Rxd1+ 7. Rf1 Rxf1#


13

The longest K + Q + Q vs K mate whilst maintaining optimality is a mate in 4.


13

Yes, it is possible. Here is an example: [Variant "From Position"] [FEN "5k2/1Q6/8/8/7q/8/8/6QK w - - 0 1"] 1. Qh2 Qe1+ 2. Kg2 Qe2+ 3. Kg3 Qe5+ 4. Kh3 Qh5+ 5. Kg2 Qe2+


13

Generally speaking, it's a draw. Most pawnless endgames are drawn, unless one side has a material advantage of more than a minor piece. Either side can win if there are short-term tactics. To check the outcome of a position, you can use an online tablebase. In particular, it's nice to view the longest wins for either side, which are (according to this page) ...


13

The important part is that you and your friend agree on what to say and when. If you both agree that queen check (or gardez) is a nice thing to say, then go ahead and say it. I suggest taking the time before your next game to clear this up. Also, if you play any friends of your friend then ask them too what they prefer. That being said, if your friend want ...


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