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46

If you promote to a queen with 1. b8Q, black has: 1...Re2+ 2. Kd1 Rb2 attacking the queen and hinting at mate with Rb1++. If white takes the rook 3. Qxb2 it is stalemate. Because of the mate threat white does not have any other good square for the queen either (no good check and no square that would defend b1). If you promote to a rook, black does ...


29

I know you're a FIDE Master :), so I suppose you're more interested in this question from a teaching perspective. The simplest way to understand a checkmate with King and Rook vs King is the idea of the rectangle of the opposing king. Consider this position- Here, the Black King is restricted by the White Rook in this giant rectangular area of the ...


22

The weaker side needs to keep Knight close to his King in order to achieve draw. There are some special cases where the stronger side wins even in those situations, like when Knight is cornered or pinned in such a way that puts weaker side in zugzwang. If the Knight is far away from the King then the result of the game depends whether or not the defending ...


22

There are several key positions from which it is easy to memorize the win. The basic idea is to drive the opposing king to the edge of the board, and then to the corner, where you can force the rook to separate from the king. [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "King and Queen"] [Black "King and Rook"] [Result "*"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN ...


21

INTRODUCTORY NOTE: Examples and instructions are taken from the book: Y.Averbakh - Comprehensive Chess Endings Volume 3. In many cases I felt no need to "reinvent the wheel" so I quoted the above authors. Those parts will be marked with apostrophes "", like this: "This is a quoted text". Without further delay let us tackle this ...


20

In the diagrammed position you have a material advantage but Black's position is a little bit better because his rooks are connected and he has a safer king position. His immediate threat is RxR, when you have to retake with the king followed by Qg1+ and after you move Kd2 he will play Bb6 and the pressure around your king will become intense. You are paying ...


16

If you have two rooks, standing on different files (one of them on the d-file), that could capture on d2, then Rdxd2 is the correct notation. If you have two rooks on the d-file, and both can take on d2, then use the rank number to disambiguate, for instance R1xd2. This is according to the Algebraic System required by FIDE's Laws of Chess (see appendix C, ...


15

The Lomonosov 7-man Endgame Tablebase show that after promotion to a queen, Black can play 1. ... Re2+ 2. Kd1 Rb2! (sacrificing the rook) Qxb2, the Black king is stalemated. If White doesn’t take the rook, then Black will take the queen and draw the game. [FEN "8/1P6/3N4/8/8/3k4/r7/4KN2 w - - 0 1"] 1. b8=Q? Re2+ 2. Kd1 Rb2! 3. Qxb2 (3. Kc1 Rxb8) However, ...


14

Brian Towers' answer is excellent. I'll just add this: if you play Rxe8, you are effectively trading your e1-rook for your opponent's a8-rook. A glance at the position should show that your e1-rook is a lot more valuable than your opponent's a8-rook. It is currently already developed and participating in the game, while the a8-rook (like your a1-rook) is ...


13

The FIDE laws of chess say nothing about upside-down rooks. However, starting with upside-down rooks is silly and if your opponent complains that it is annoying, I would expect the claim to be upheld. 11.5 It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. https://handbook.fide.com/chapter/E012018 The proper way of dealing with ...


13

Generally speaking, it's a draw. Most pawnless endgames are drawn, unless one side has a material advantage of more than a minor piece. Either side can win if there are short-term tactics. To check the outcome of a position, you can use an online tablebase. In particular, it's nice to view the longest wins for either side, which are (according to this page) ...


12

The FIDE rules say this about castling: This is a move of the king and either rook of the same colour along the player’s first rank, counting as a single move of the king


12

You need to understand that the point system is only a rough guideline meant to assist you in evaluating positions or in deciding on potential exchanges. Many factors, particularly the pawn structure, influences how valuable pieces are. Rooks tend to be better in open positions with fewer pieces/pawns on the board, bishops can get hindered in closed ...


11

Yes, since K+R is an easy beginner checkmate. In fact, the Knight will get in the way. The only value of the Knight will be to get White into Zugzwang quicker (easier?), which helps Black push the king to an edge. To answer the specific question, from above, assuming Black to move: 1... Kc3 2. Ka1 Rc1# Assuming White to move: 1. Ka1 Kc3 2. Kb1 Kb3 3. ...


10

In analyzing and studying this endgame, I believe I have found a very simple way to explain the defensive technique (for this example, we will consider the defender to be Black). Once I learned this technique, I played some blitz Rook vs Knight endgames vs top chess programs and drew all of them. Knight's Box I found it useful to visualize the technique ...


10

In general, it is not easy to develop rooks during the opening per se. Not only it's not easy, it rarely is a goal of the sound opening. In some references, the opening ends, when minor pieces (bishops and knights) are developed and rooks are connected. Therefore, it is highly likely that you are already talking about the middlegame rather than the opening. ...


9

Have a look at the wikipedia article on relative chess piece values, it provides an extensive discussion on the matter. To see how you can compare two given pieces, let's consider your bishop vs rook question at a basic level: A rook's movement is not restricted to a color, unlike the bishop's. This makes half of the board squares inaccessible to a bishop. ...


9

This is a losing position for White. Normally, trading for a queen against two rooks is reasonable but Black has an extra knight here... The best objective move sequence would be: 1.Qxe8 Rxe8 2.Rxe8+ Kf7 3.Re2 Qb6+ White's position after 3...Qb6+ is absolutely hopeless - the rooks have no useful squares. White has no counterplay, no attacks, no chance for ...


9

You say your opponent had a strong attack against your king and you had to "sacrifice" your rook for two minor pieces and went on to lose. I think you have it the wrong way round. It sounds like your opponent had a strong attack against your king and sacrificed two minor pieces for your rook, your one active piece by the sound of it. In general a rook and ...


8

I do this often in blitz, although it is considered somewhat inappropriate in a tournament setting. The quick way to castle with one hand is to make a motion where you "capture" the rook. In a typical capture, you pick up your piece and knock the opposing piece into your hand. You then take the piece off the board. What I mean by "capturing" your rook is ...


8

Essentially, you should ask yourself a broader question: where should both of my rooks go in this position? There might be another (half-)open file which can be used by the other rook. If there's only one open file and little chance of another one opening or a pawn needing extra protection, it might not even matter which rook you use, since it's rather ...


7

INTRODUCTORY NOTE: Examples and instructions are taken from the book: Y.Averbakh - Comprehensive Chess Endings Volume 2. RELEVANT POSITIONS FOR PLAYING THIS ENDGAME SUCCESSFULLY: I will quote the introduction from the above book: "It is impossible to win against correct defense, even if the defender's king is driven back to the edge of the board. When ...


7

Well, it is as simple as encasing a rook in a virtual box. We'll take the example and see it. [Date "????.??.??"] [Result "*"] [FEN "1k5r/1P3K2/8/2p2p2/7p/4P3/8/3R4 w - - 0 1"] 1.e4 fxe4 2.Kg7 Rh5 3.Kg6 Re5 4.Kf6 Re8 5.Kf7 Rh8 6.Kg7 We see that the rook is trapped inside a 4x4 box. Losing the rook means losing the position, and the only way not to ...


7

There is no absolute result for this type of endgame-it all depends on the position of the pieces. In fact, any result is possible. Objectively, this particular position with black to move is a loss-you didn't make a mistake.I suggest you consult endgame tablebase, which announce a loss in 24 moves with best play by Black. Here is an example line. [FEN "8/...


7

In general, prophylaxis can be used to prevent the rooks getting on the 7th. This is the preferred defense; common challenging moves are to contest open columns with your own rooks, or to guard the 7th rank squares with your minor pieces. In the case that the rooks are already on the 7th, you should secure the most urgent threats (where your king is or ...


7

Generally when you read/hear something like "to put the rook on a semi-open file" it means a file where the opponent's pawn is on. The reasoning behind this is just piece activity, i.e. to maximize the available squares for the rook and also to attack something (the opponent's pawn on that file). The only time where it makes sense (on general principles) to ...


7

The mystery is easily solved if you just follow a few alternatives with the engine. The point is simply that if White comes to b4, the Rc5 gets another protection. This means that after exd5 Rxd5, White can march on with Ke4 as c5 is no longer hanging, and his activity wins in the long end (autoplay again). And cxd5 instead will immediately lead to zugzwang, ...


6

You can castle when all of these conditions hold true: The King and the Rook did not make any moves so far. The King is not in check. The King will not pass a threatened square during castling. The King will not land on a threatened square. Condition 3 might need clarification. For example, you have the white pieces and you want to castle kingside. Then, ...


6

As a general rule, two Rooks tend to be stronger than a Queen. Typical endgames like 2R+5P vs Q+5P are much better for the rooks who will coordinate to attack the opponent's weakest pawn. However, some factors can favor the queen: Open kings : the queen is very strong in direct mating attacks. It can checkmate with minimal support, fork king and ...


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