We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

31

The basis of your question comes down to whether a piece is truly in position to execute an en passant if it is otherwised pinned. The answer can be found in the FIDE rules stated just before the explicit mention of the en passant: "Positions as in (a) and (b) are considered the same, if the same player has the move, pieces of the same kind and colour ...


29

Stalemate is a draw in classical chess yet there are other chess variants both historical and modern where stalemate is not a draw. Very early versions of Chess, such as Shatranj Chess (props to Andrew Latham) declare the player causing stalemate the winner and even today there are callings to return to that rule. for example: Larry Kaufman Chess Life ...


27

If you drive an enemy king into a corner, you still need to control four different squares to checkmate him. Your king can control two of those squares (but cannot approach the enemy king), your knight can control the third, but there is no way of controlling the fourth. That is, it is impossible for the knight to control both the corner square and the one ...


27

Draw with insufficient material is covered in article 9.6: The game is drawn when a position is reached from which a checkmate cannot occur by any possible series of legal moves, even with the most unskilled play. With a given material, it is possible to construct a checkmate (assuming your cooperation or horrible blunders), so it is not a draw.


23

Worst-case scenario: Upgraded all your pawns to knights Your king is at Ka8 Your knights surround your king, so at Nb8, Na7 and Nb7 Opposition knight is at Nc7# - checkmate! So it is indeed possible to lose, thus not a draw.


22

As Totero notes, changing stalemate in this fashion would drastically change endgame play. Currently, one must learn how to recognize different King/Pawn endings, and how other pieces interact with these endings. Opposite- vs same-color Bishops, Knight/Pawn vs Knight, Rook/Pawn vs Rook, and other basic variations. Changing stalemate to a win would throw ...


22

Most basic first - this rule is the reason that King vs King is an immediate draw. Neither side has a piece to check with, let alone checkmate with. A position that is a draw because neither side can win is called a "dead position". Playing against a bare king, a bishop or a knight is insufficient to checkmate with, and therefore K+B v K and K+N v K is ...


22

According to the Lomonosov tablebases, it's mate in 40 for black. While the queen can't force mate by herself, she can force a zugzwang. In this case, when the bishop is forced to move to e8. Then, it's a matter of giving checks until the queen forks the king and bishop. One of the longest variations given is as follows: [FEN "7k/5BpP/3K2P1/8/8/8/8/4q3 w -...


21

The weaker side needs to keep Knight close to his King in order to achieve draw. There are some special cases where the stronger side wins even in those situations, like when Knight is cornered or pinned in such a way that puts weaker side in zugzwang. If the Knight is far away from the King then the result of the game depends whether or not the defending ...


21

Here's a simpler way to see why it's winning for black: You're right that the queen cannot checkmate the king by itself, but it can stalemate the king [*] (an example pointed out by Ionut Deaconu) and that's all we need here as that would force the bishop to move. Once the bishop moves it's clear that material loss is unavoidable as either the bishop [**] or ...


21

No. Rule 9.1.2.1 of the FIDE rules says it all: 9.1.2.1 A player wishing to offer a draw shall do so after having made a move on the chessboard and before pressing his clock. An offer at any other time during play is still valid but Article 11.5 must be considered. No conditions can be attached to the offer. In both cases the offer cannot be ...


20

[fen ""] 1. a4 b5 2. b4 bxa4 3. c4 c5 4. d4 cxb4 5. e4 d5 6. f4 dxc4 7. g4 e5 8. h4 exd4 9. Ba3 g5 10. Nc3 gxh4 11. Qb3 f5 12. Kf2 h3 13. Kg3 h2 14. Bd3 Qa5 15. Kh4 dxc3 16. Kg5 h5 17. Kg6 cxb3 18. g5 Rh7 19. Ra2 Rc7 20. Bc4 Rxc4 21. Kh7 Bd6 22. g6 fxe4 23. Kg7 hxg1=Q 24. Kh7 h4 25. Kg7 h3 26. Kh7 h2 27. Kg7 bxa3 28. Kh7 bxa2 29. Kg7 Qgb6 30. Rg1 hxg1=Q 31. ...


20

Yes. [Event "Northumbria Masters"] [Site "Newcastle"] [Date "2018.02.18"] [Round "8"] [White "Britton, Richard L"] [Black "Hebden GM, Mark L"] [ECO "C89"] [WhiteElo "2255"] [BlackElo "2454"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d6 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Bc2 Re8 13. Nf1 ...


18

Black is winning handily from the diagram position, and has a fairly straightforward strategy going forward: force the b-pawn's advance to b2 with the support of the bishops (starting with 1...Be6 to gain control of the b3 square), and then slowly push for a new queen, making use of the facts that (1) White must always keep guard over b1, and (2) Black has ...


17

If a player has a theoretical win, that person has a move limit (50 moves) with "no fundamental alteration of the position." That means no captures of pawns or pieces, and no pawn moves. The count is reset if either of these things happens. There used to be an exception for positions like king, bishop, and knight vs. King (a checkmate). It was known to be ...


17

I think stalemate is a draw for the same reason that dropping the white ball when potting black is a loss in 8-ball pool - it gives the losing player a granule of hope until the very end, and it ensures that the winner must be clinical in securing his win. With regards to whether this flows logically from the other rules of the game - chess is, after all, a ...


16

In the vast majority of the cases, an ending of Q+R vs. Q should be winning. However, some exceptions exist, for instance: [FEN "6RK/7Q/5q2/8/8/8/8/3k4 w - - 0 1"] 1.Qg7 Qh4+ 2.Qh7 Qf6+ 3.Rg7 Qd8+ 4.Qg8 Qh4+ 5.Rh7 Qf6+ In case you want to check whether your game was winning or not and how to win it, you can consult a tablebase, for example the ...


16

Two conditions must apply for a position to be checkmate: The player to move has no legal moves. His king is in check. The first is true here, but the second isn't, so it's not checkmate. When a player to move has no legal moves but isn't in check, it's called stalemate, and it's an immediate draw.


15

This is a complicated situation, and it is made even more complicated by the fact that USCF and FIDE rules differ slightly. First and most importantly, the 50 move rule always applies. If 50 moves are made without a capture or a pawn move, then the game is simply declared drawn. The rules about insufficient material only are important when one side ...


15

Yes, it seems to be drawn. Unfortunately the PGN comments window isn't yet active in the site's PGN viewer, but here goes. First consider the following variation, but in particular the position after 2.Kxh5 first: [FEN "8/8/8/3k3p/3P3K/2P3R1/8/7r w - - 0 1"] 1.Rh3 Rg1 2.Kxh5 Rg8 3.Rf3 Kc4 4.Kh4 Kd5? 5.Rf5+! Here we don't even need to consult an engine ...


15

With black to move, he is not in check but he also has no legal moves. There is no square where his king can go without putting himself in check, and that would be an illegal move. That situation is called stalemate (Wikipedia), and it is an immediate draw by the rules of the game. You've boxed him in too well. As to why stalemate is a draw see Why is ...


15

Oh sure, here are two examples (annotated): This is a neat puzzle from the chess.com tactics, with white to play! [title "White to play!"] [fen "1q6/2b2ppb/4p1k1/7p/2Np1p1P/3P1Q2/6PK/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Ne5+ Bxe5 {black has to take else white either checkmates or wins the queen.} 2.Qg3+ fxg3+ {Pawn takes queen is forced else white checkmates} 3.Kh3 {and ...


14

Your opponent has 50 moves, but every time a pawn is moved the count is reset. So, he could have hundreds of moves if he has a few pawns on the board. If he has no pawns, then 50. The count is also reset if any piece or pawn is captured.


14

Actually, looks to me like black is winning. For example: 8/5pk1/6p1/2pQ1b2/1p1b1P2/5K2/8/8 b - - 0 1 1... Be6 2. Qb7 b3 3. f5 {only move - opening black's position up} gxf5 (3... Bxf5?!) Kf4 b2 {now black has to escape queen's checks...} From here, white can go on with some checking sequence, but it looks to me that black will be able to escape a draw by ...


13

This is opinion based and therefore not a great fit for the Stack Exchange format, but here are my thoughts anyway. The lower the time limit, the more acceptable it is from a sportsmanship view. In standard long time controls, this is really poor form. In 1-minute ("bullet"), anything goes, including this. The reasoning is that in these really fast forms of ...


13

Checkmate overrides the 50 move rule. Fide Handbook Article 9.3: The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by a player having the move, if: a. he writes his move, which cannot be changed, on his scoresheet and declares to the arbiter his intention to make this move which will result in the last 50 moves by each player having been made without the ...


13

This is stalemate; you're right that Black can't move, but (unfortunately for you) in Chess this means it's a draw.


12

In tournament play, you make your move on the board, state your offer clearly (I say "I offer a draw" and make eye contact to make sure I am understood), then press your clock.


12

What you are describing is Perpetual Check: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_check It is covered in the rules of chess and the result of such a game is a draw. It is up to your opponent to try and avoid this situation if he thinks he can win. Conversely, if you might lose you should try to get into some kind of draw situation to avoid a loss. ...


12

Looks like I am late to the party. Anyway: Free PGNs of many top players are available here. Almost all 2700+ players are there. As for women, only a few from very top are there. These PGN files have anywhere from few hundred to couple thousand games available for each player. Although this does not fully comply with OPs request, it seems like an ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible