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45

From my experience (small to medium central European Opens), offering a handshake without words is a commonly accepted form of resignation. The handshake is not part of any official rules. However, there is some reasoning behind it: You shake hands after the game ended (just as you do before it starts). So you only start extending your hand once that end ...


39

White is one tempo short of catching the pawn - if White could make two moves immediately it would be a draw as white would just take the black pawn. But they can't, so white has to find a threat which black has to respond to which gains them that move. The only threat they can make is to queen their pawn, and apparently black can stop that with their bishop ...


32

The position given by Akavall is indeed a draw by perpetual, but it's a bit difficult to see because White has many different options at some moves. They can even choose to sacrifice the h2 queen, which effectively ends the perpetual (but it's still a draw). A position where this is much easier to see is the following one: [FEN "5k2/8/8/8/8/5q2/7Q/6QK w ...


28

Draw with insufficient material is covered in article 9.6: The game is drawn when a position is reached from which a checkmate cannot occur by any possible series of legal moves, even with the most unskilled play. With a given material, it is possible to construct a checkmate (assuming your cooperation or horrible blunders), so it is not a draw.


28

This is a fortress and a draw. The black king can't advance as the rook, shuffling between h3 and f3, prevents it. The only way to break the fortress is to trade the queen for the rook and pawn, but the resulting endgame is still a draw.


26

Oh sure, here are two examples (annotated): This is a neat puzzle from the chess.com tactics, with white to play! [title "White to play!"] [fen "1q6/2b2ppb/4p1k1/7p/2Np1p1P/3P1Q2/6PK/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Ne5+ Bxe5 {black has to take else white either checkmates or wins the queen.} 2.Qg3+ fxg3+ {Pawn takes queen is forced else white checkmates} 3.Kh3 {and ...


24

Most basic first - this rule is the reason that King vs King is an immediate draw. Neither side has a piece to check with, let alone checkmate with. A position that is a draw because neither side can win is called a "dead position". Playing against a bare king, a bishop or a knight is insufficient to checkmate with, and therefore K+B v K and K+N v K is ...


24

According to the Lomonosov tablebases, it's mate in 40 for black. While the queen can't force mate by herself, she can force a zugzwang. In this case, when the bishop is forced to move to e8. Then, it's a matter of giving checks until the queen forks the king and bishop. One of the longest variations given is as follows: [FEN "7k/5BpP/3K2P1/8/8/8/8/4q3 w -...


23

No. Rule 9.1.2.1 of the FIDE rules says it all: 9.1.2.1 A player wishing to offer a draw shall do so after having made a move on the chessboard and before pressing his clock. An offer at any other time during play is still valid but Article 11.5 must be considered. No conditions can be attached to the offer. In both cases the offer cannot be ...


23

Worst-case scenario: Upgraded all your pawns to knights Your king is at Ka8 Your knights surround your king, so at Nb8, Na7 and Nb7 Opposition knight is at Nc7# - checkmate! So it is indeed possible to lose, thus not a draw.


23

Why is there no rule allowing a player to claim a draw in lonely king endgames? For the simple reason that there is no need. If you are the player with the extra material you can offer a draw and be almost guaranteed that your opponent will accept the offer. If you have an opponent who is ignorant of the rules you can walk away and let your clock time ...


22

The weaker side needs to keep Knight close to his King in order to achieve draw. There are some special cases where the stronger side wins even in those situations, like when Knight is cornered or pinned in such a way that puts weaker side in zugzwang. If the Knight is far away from the King then the result of the game depends whether or not the defending ...


22

Here's a simpler way to see why it's winning for black: You're right that the queen cannot checkmate the king by itself, but it can stalemate the king [*] (an example pointed out by Ionut Deaconu) and that's all we need here as that would force the bishop to move. Once the bishop moves it's clear that material loss is unavoidable as either the bishop [**] or ...


22

[fen ""] 1. a4 b5 2. b4 bxa4 3. c4 c5 4. d4 cxb4 5. e4 d5 6. f4 dxc4 7. g4 e5 8. h4 exd4 9. Ba3 g5 10. Nc3 gxh4 11. Qb3 f5 12. Kf2 h3 13. Kg3 h2 14. Bd3 Qa5 15. Kh4 dxc3 16. Kg5 h5 17. Kg6 cxb3 18. g5 Rh7 19. Ra2 Rc7 20. Bc4 Rxc4 21. Kh7 Bd6 22. g6 fxe4 23. Kg7 hxg1=Q 24. Kh7 h4 25. Kg7 h3 26. Kh7 h2 27. Kg7 bxa3 28. Kh7 bxa2 29. Kg7 Qgb6 30. Rg1 hxg1=Q 31. ...


22

This position is a standard classical fortress. There is no way the Black color can go through as long as White just shuffle pieces, wait and do nothing silly. Stockfish is a computer algorithm, it has no intelligence. It doesn't know it's a draw unless it searches for all the possibilities, but it's practically impossible. Connect to a 6-piece tablebase, ...


21

Yes. [Event "Northumbria Masters"] [Site "Newcastle"] [Date "2018.02.18"] [Round "8"] [White "Britton, Richard L"] [Black "Hebden GM, Mark L"] [ECO "C89"] [WhiteElo "2255"] [BlackElo "2454"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d6 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Bc2 Re8 13. Nf1 ...


20

I think stalemate is a draw for the same reason that dropping the white ball when potting black is a loss in 8-ball pool - it gives the losing player a granule of hope until the very end, and it ensures that the winner must be clinical in securing his win. With regards to whether this flows logically from the other rules of the game - chess is, after all, a ...


20

Black is winning handily from the diagram position, and has a fairly straightforward strategy going forward: force the b-pawn's advance to b2 with the support of the bishops (starting with 1...Be6 to gain control of the b3 square), and then slowly push for a new queen, making use of the facts that (1) White must always keep guard over b1, and (2) Black has ...


20

Both recording checks and draw offers are personal preference, and neither is required in your notation. I actually do record both checks as "+" or "++", and draw offers as "(d)". I know I am not the only one to note draw offers as I have friends, who do the same. I also record times. The purpose of the notation is so you, or the arbiter, can play back ...


20

Etiquette doesn't really come into it unless your name is Gata Kamsky (strong language warning for the link). The rule is very simple. If you want flagging to be a part of the game then play with no increment, otherwise always play with an increment.


19

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: Appendix C. Algebraic notation C.12 The offer of a draw shall be marked as (=) As with a number of the laws regarding recording of the moves this is not strictly enforced by arbiters. I did once play in a tournament in which a very junior arbiter delivered a short harangue to us players telling us to record draw ...


19

is it legal to reply with resignation when a draw is offered? Of course. This is all that the FIDE Laws of Chess has to say about resignation: 5.1.2 The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately ends the game. You can resign at any time during the game. It doesn't even need to be your turn. I have done this. I once ...


18

The polite way to react to a legally made (opponent moves, offers draw and then presses the clock) draw offer which you are not going to immediately accept is to say something like "I'll think about it". In a team competitions it is quite common for the player offered the draw to stand up and go and look at his teammates' games to see the standing in the ...


17

Two conditions must apply for a position to be checkmate: The player to move has no legal moves. His king is in check. The first is true here, but the second isn't, so it's not checkmate. When a player to move has no legal moves but isn't in check, it's called stalemate, and it's an immediate draw.


17

A dead draw is a position in which no player has any chance of winning. Sometimes erroneously used in a position where theoretically someone could win but both players believe it is so basic and simple that neither will make a fatal mistake so the other player would win.


16

This is opinion based and therefore not a great fit for the Stack Exchange format, but here are my thoughts anyway. The lower the time limit, the more acceptable it is from a sportsmanship view. In standard long time controls, this is really poor form. In 1-minute ("bullet"), anything goes, including this. The reasoning is that in these really fast forms of ...


16

In the vast majority of the cases, an ending of Q+R vs. Q should be winning. However, some exceptions exist, for instance: [FEN "6RK/7Q/5q2/8/8/8/8/3k4 w - - 0 1"] 1.Qg7 Qh4+ 2.Qh7 Qf6+ 3.Rg7 Qd8+ 4.Qg8 Qh4+ 5.Rh7 Qf6+ In case you want to check whether your game was winning or not and how to win it, you can consult a tablebase, for example the ...


16

Well, simply put, they chose to follow the USCF "Article 14: The Drawn Game rule 14E: Insufficient material to win on time, 14E3: King and two knights." While it is not a forced mate, there is a mating position that is possible, thus they could have easily followed the FIDE rule, and allowed the side with the knights to continue playing. It was probably a ...


15

Your opponent has 50 moves, but every time a pawn is moved the count is reset. So, he could have hundreds of moves if he has a few pawns on the board. If he has no pawns, then 50. The count is also reset if any piece or pawn is captured.


15

Actually, looks to me like black is winning. For example: 8/5pk1/6p1/2pQ1b2/1p1b1P2/5K2/8/8 b - - 0 1 1... Be6 2. Qb7 b3 3. f5 {only move - opening black's position up} gxf5 (3... Bxf5?!) Kf4 b2 {now black has to escape queen's checks...} From here, white can go on with some checking sequence, but it looks to me that black will be able to escape a draw by ...


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