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26

The simple and obvious answer is that it all depends on the position of black's pawns and king. In general the further up the board the pawns the better for black provided the king is in contact with the pawns, preferably in front of them. Worth pointing out that the position you give is winning for white because the pawns aren't far enough forward. From ...


18

The definition is still a bit ambiguous, but here's what I found. The absolute soonest to move the queen is probably the French Defense: Chigorin Variation which begins with 1.e4 e6 2.Qe2. The Scandinavian with 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 looks like the most common way to move the queen on move 2. I found a game by GM Aleksandr Rakhmanov in 2019 at standard time ...


10

First of all, White wins in the diagram you provide, although it's not obvious at a glance how. White plays Qf2 first to stop the king from advancing. Black can't just sit there forever because the White king will eventually eat that a-pawn and come back, so they have to play h4, and then another pawn move. If Black plays g3, White responds with Qf3, and now ...


8

If you're looking for something more common than the Scandanavian, then I think the Classical Variation of the Nimzo-Indian is the most common opening with a queen move on move 4 or earlier: 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 Qc2


7

Some say the endgame begins when the kings can come out and join the fight. Usually it's not safe for them to do so until queens are off the board.


6

That sentence is taken out of context. I copy here the text of the full paragraph, which answers your question: If the game is not to be played rigorously, according to the rules above mentioned, then moderate your desire of victory over your adversary, and be pleased with one over yourself. Snatch not eagerly at every advantage offered by his unskilfulness ...


4

To assume that the game has reached the endgame just because the Queens have been exchanged is a bad conceptual mistake that can lead to disaster. A classic example is a game Verlinski-Alekhine where Queens are traded very early in the game and white plays the early middlegame "as if" it was an endgame already with the result of getting run over by ...


2

Because the Queen is so versatile, it is hard to give general rules, but you might try asking the question, which of my other pieces do I want her to cooperate with? She might combine with one of your Bishops to attack squares of that color, or with Rook(s) to control an open file. Queen and Knight can be deadly together because neither is restricted to one ...


2

At the beginning the tendency to bring my queen out early was an urge I failed to control for my first few games. Nevertheless a pretty common opening where the queen is out in the first moves played is in the Scandinavian and the Scholar's Mate, these are two among a couple more openings. Scholar's Mate (Checkmate Sequence): [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. ...


1

Here are some stats from the Syzygy tablebase, of win and loss percentages of various material balances. This tablebase is of positions of up to 7 units, so where White has KQB or KQN, Black can't have more than 4 units. First, let's pit the balances KQB and KQN against each other. Here, in KQB v KQN, KQB wins 25.0% & loses 21.0% of positions. Next, for ...


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