78

To get out of check, the king needs to move to a square that isn't attacked by any opposing pieces, or you need to capture/block attacking pieces such that the king is no longer under attack on its current square. Since the queen is attacking the king and both of the unblocked squares it can move to, white needs to capture the queen to get out of check here. ...


58

It is not a question of ethics, but more about being courteous. Chess is a game where it is impossible to separate the joy of the game from the competitiveness/ego aspect so by declaring a forced win in N moves, you are effectively asking your opponent to resign immediately even though he hasn't seen the forced win yet owing to his lesser faculties/skill ...


52

Initial Analysis White is clearly in a dire situation, since Black is threatening mate in one on either h7 or h8 if White doesn't do anything. But the White king can't move move nor can White get rid of any of the pawns that surround the king. White's rook, the only White piece, is too far away to do anything. The move 1. Ra8? to try and stop 1... Qh8# fails ...


50

Double check is only possible by using discovered check. So either the rook check or the bishop check was discovered by moving something in between on the previous move. I don't see how that's possible with the rook check, but it is possible with the bishop -- if the board is shown with black at the bottom, contrary to what is usually done. Then there could ...


50

Here is a starter solution in 7 moves. Can we do better? [FEN ""] 1.g3 e5 2.Bh3 Ke7 3.Bxd7 Kxd7 4.Kf1 Ke7 5. Kg2 Ke6 6.Kh3 Kf6+ 7.Kh4 Kg6# If this is best, interestingly, the play is almost forced. The only variations are 4... Kd6 or 4... Ke7 in the line above. There is also 4... Ke6 and 5... Kf5, or 3. Kf1 Kd6/Ke8 4. Bxd7 Kxd7 5.Kg2 Ke6, etc. ...


46

It is not checkmate because Black can interpose a piece to block the check from the bishop: move knight or queen to e6. It's still only a miniscule delay for the inevitable. [FEN "1rk4r/1p6/3p3q/Q1pPbRnP/p1P3B1/P6P/1P4R1/7K w - - 0 1"] 1.Rf7+ Ne6 (1...Qe6 2.Qc7#) 2.Qc7# 1-0


43

It's impossible to checkmate faster than 7 turns (handicap on black) or 8 turns (handicap on white). Proof by elimination I'm going to argue from the perspective that white is helping and black is handicapped, since otherwise it would take 1 more move. Only Queen, Bishops and Rooks can be used by the black player to threaten the white king, as only they ...


36

Welcome to Chess Stack Exchange. I believe you're doing well here. It is surely a checkmate. Probably the website isn't programmed that way to recognize that move. But, as per your question, this is clearly a checkmate that resembles the one-rook-mate pattern.


36

Even though the board is upside down, the position is still easily legal. [FEN ""] [startply "86"] [StartFlipped "1"] 1. a4 h5 2. g4 h4 3. Bg2 Rh5 4. gxh5 h3 5. h6 e5 6. Nf3 Bc5 7. Nxe5 hxg2 8. h4 Ne7 9. h5 g5 10. Rh4 Ng6 11. Rf4 g4 12. Rxf7 Qh4 13. e3 Bxe3 14. Ke2 a5 15. f4 Qf2+ 16. Kd3 Nc6 17. b4 b5 18. bxa5 Rxa5 19. Rf8+ Ke7 ...


35

The bishop on c2 can be moved to h7 to block the check.


34

The queen is protected by the bishop on h2, so the black king cannot take the queen. Nothing else can take the queen and the queen covers b8 and d7.


33

One amazing game I know that ends in a pawn mate in one called The Polish Immortal in which Black sacrifices all four minor pieces to win the game! The pawn does a double-step to give the mate. [Title "Glucksberg-Miguel Najdorf, Warsaw Poland, 1929, The Polish Immortal"] [FEN ""] 1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 d5 5.e3 c6 6.Bd3 Bd6 7.O-O ...


33

No, this is not possible. for example move the piece, don't press the clock and then resign? In particular, that loophole is explicitly covered by the rules: 6.2.1 During the game each player, having made his move on the chessboard, shall stop his own clock and start his opponent’s clock (that is to say, he shall press his clock). This “completes” the ...


32

The majority of the users find that insulting. Is it really insulting to [...] I can answer the question based on this excerpt alone. The answer is yes.


31

I want to offer a semi-realistic example. I think I have seen something like this in a game by masters in some book, but of course I cannot recall where. But this is something that at least can be realistically missed in calculations from far away. [FEN "6k1/5ppp/6r1/3b4/4r3/8/1Q5P/1R5K w - - 0 1"] White just gives a back rank mate, right? :) ...


29

I know you're a FIDE Master :), so I suppose you're more interested in this question from a teaching perspective. The simplest way to understand a checkmate with King and Rook vs King is the idea of the rectangle of the opposing king. Consider this position- Here, the Black King is restricted by the White Rook in this giant rectangular area of the ...


29

In a tournament game, you are not supposed to speak at all other than to offer a draw or adjust a piece. This includes saying check. This tends to seep into casual games among more experienced players (I haven't said check in years). For players that do not compete in tournaments at all, I don't think that there is any obligation to point it out. When ...


29

It is not checkmate if the other player has any legal move that gets them out of check. Capturing the checking piece is one such way; whether the capture is en passant or not is irrelevant for the purpose of this question. In this case, an en passant capture is the only legal move. If the other player didn't know the en passant rule, I suppose they might ...


29

White to play checkmates in 2 with 1 d4+! exd3 e.p. 2 Qbf4#. Black to play cannot checkmate in 2 but should win after Bxf7. 7r/1p3Q1p/2q5/3bk3/1Q2p3/2P5/r2P2PP/2KR4 w - - 0 1 1. d4+! exd3 2. Qbf4


27

There are no checkmates from 0-3 ply. 4 ply: 8 checkmates, 197,281 total nodes 5 ply: 347 checkmates, 4,865,609 total nodes 6 ply: 10,828 checkmates, 119,060,324 total nodes 7 ply: 435,767 checkmates, 3,195,901,860 total nodes 8 ply: 9,852,036 checkmates, 84,998,978,956 total nodes 9 ply: 400,191,963 checkmates, 2,439,530,234,167 total nodes "checkmates" ...


26

It is a nice little puzzle: 3k4/3P4/3Q4/8/8/8/8/4K3 w - - 3 13 1. Qd5 Kc7/Ke7 2. d8=Q# 1-0


26

The position shown in board 2 is not a checkmate, as you correctly say. The book is not completely clear here. The sentence "Checkmate with Queen and King" is only the task of an exercise: you have to set up the position you see on a real board, and move the pieces trying to checkmate the black king using the white Queen and King. The checkmate is not ...


26

However, if black takes with Rook, then Knight takes' white's rook, white rook to take knight, then black rook to take white rook. This prevents the Qe8 mate, doesn't it? No, it accelerates it. Let's look at what happens if black takes with the knight instead of the rook [fen "1r1r2k1/6pp/2n4q/2p1p2Q/pp2N2P/5P2/PPPR2P1/1K1R4 w - - 0 1"] 1. Rxd8 ...


26

Since you are a beginner in chess first you need to understand the term pin in chess. In chess, a pin is a situation brought on by an attacking piece in which a defending piece cannot move without exposing a more valuable defending piece on its other side to capture by the attacking piece. Now, coming to your answer: Rook cannot capture the queen at f7 as ...


25

I always like to explain this in a visual way. Basic Idea: Keep the bishops together. They form a large net (restricted area) from which the opponent king cannot escape. Step 1: Push Opponent's King To Edge Rank or File Keeping the bishops together and using the king for support, make the restricted area smaller to push the opponent's king back to an ...


25

Rook at d2 is pinned by the bishop at g5 and hence the rook can not capture the black queen at c2 checkmating the white king at c1.


24

Actually, the bishop and knight mate is not as slippery as it appears. I have checked this on a tablebase program I wrote. On a 10x10 board, the side with the bishop and knight (say white) can force mate in at most 47 moves. White can even force mate on a 16x16 board, in at most 93 moves. I believe mate can be forced on an arbitrarily large even size ...


24

Most basic first - this rule is the reason that King vs King is an immediate draw. Neither side has a piece to check with, let alone checkmate with. A position that is a draw because neither side can win is called a "dead position". Playing against a bare king, a bishop or a knight is insufficient to checkmate with, and therefore K+B v K and K+N v K is ...


24

This is really a question for fairly low-rated players, who tend to play things out to the bitter end. If you are reasonably strong, the only reason your opponent does not resign earlier is that he thought you played such a good game that he allows you to execute the checkmate (I have done this), or thinks that the final position is beautiful, and saw it ...


24

Probably more often than people realize. There have been several notable instances where GMs (even world champions) have missed simple mates in one. From my own experience, when I analyze my games the engine frequently will point out some ridiculous 25 move forced mate. In a game, I'm not going to take the time to calculate something like that out if I have ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible