35

This position is a draw, the game is over. It is not possible for either side to checkmate the other from this position, not even if the side with the bare king would try to help. The same is true for king and knight vs king. A single knight or bishop without any pawns or other pieces is not enough to win the game. With king and two knights vs king it is in ...


14

This isn't checkmate yet. Neither side is even in check! However, black is threatening to play Qg2, which would put white in check and there would be nothing to stop that check -- checkmate. So it's not checkmate yet, but it will be soon unless white defends against the threat somehow. And there is no way to defend against it -- white can block the queen's ...


11

I believe you are looking at an engine, and it's telling you is that black, with the correct play, will checkmate the opponent. It's not checkmate yet, but as the game progresses, white cannot stop checkmate. The engine is showing checkmate not because it's checkmate, but because black will eventually lead to checkmate. White can delay the game by giving up ...


9

The game Najer - Polgar, Richard Riordan GM Blitz, 2009 is from TWIC 767, along with the above sequence of moves. Sicilian Paulsen, White win, 78 moves. There are a large number of moveless games from the same tournament, so it looks like the event organisers had problems recording the game moves accurately.


8

Respond with 2... d5. If White plays 3. exd6, then 3.. Bd6. White has wasted 3 moves on the e-pawn, and after that Black has one piece developed against white's zero. Normally White just follows 2... d5 with 3. d4 and we're back into the regular French Defence advanced variation.


8

The key point is that taking the rook reduces your positional advantage. Your knight is active but the rook is passive; With your knight on d4 the squares the rook can move to are extremely limited. After 8. ... Nxc2+ 9. Kf1 h6, only f3 and g3 are better squares for the rook. However, with the advancement of pawns on the king side, the queen will be chased ...


6

The point here is that none of Black's possible responses to 1. Bxd6 prevent 2. Qxf7#. Blocking with the rook or queen leaves it pinned, and blocking with the knight or bishop or capturing with the queen means that the black queen is no longer attacking f7. The puzzle just gives an example second move, with the implication that it doesn't matter which one ...


6

This is known as the Steinitz Attack, and he won several quite nice games with it. Against ..d6 or..d5 he took and played on the dark squares with d4, f4, Qe2, b3, Bb2, Ne5, Rae1,.. Much more than this I do not know, but it seems that it cant be all that bad.


6

If you look closely, the bishop only attacks on squares of a specific color (in this case, it's a light square bishop). As long as the opponent king steps on dark squares, it's impossible to 'check'mate the opponent king. During the endgame with very few pawns on the board, it is most likely best to sacrifice your piece for an opponent's pawn, as they have ...


6

After Qb3 or Qb5, black has the move Rb4 - kicking the queen away from the defense of the knight. In that line, white is losing a full piece. There is slightly more compensation by instead playing Nxb6 Rxc4 Nxc4 because at least there the black king is also exposed. If you're ever confused on why the engine played the move it did, just turn on the analysis ...


5

e4 is an opening that controls d5. By playing e6 as black, you are fighting for d5 as well, without playing ...d5 immediately and risking your queen getting hit. With white playing e5, it's just a bad move. I don't understand why someone would play it, as it weakens control of d5 and f5, moves the same piece twice, and weakens the pawn overall. I can only ...


5

White can't defend the a3-pawn. The White king is defenceless on the queenside, and you have the knight on a great outpost near the White king, the bishop a mere ...d5-d4 away from joining the attack. The Black queen is entering the fray either via Qb6 or Qa5. both Black rooks can participate in the attack through Rc6-b6 or Rc6-a6, or along the c-file. ...


4

Note, also, that Nxc2 is +1 on material while Nxb3 is +2 as the knight should be captured--I do not see why your opponent launched that futile attack and let the knight escape. However, along with that +1 material the king has to move, costing him several moves to get the rook out and the king to safety.


4

This is just an issue every engine has (although they may miss different moves). In this case, it just pruned (ie, didn't consider/didnt consider enough) Ne6. It's not common per se, but has to be kept in mind Also note Lc0 is not NNUE, it is just a normal neural network not NNUE which is special.


4

The above output from Stockfish is what's called the Primary Variation (PV), what it considers the best line of play for both sides. But the output is the PV at each search depth: 1 ply from the start position, 3 ply, all the way up to 21 plies. So at a search depth of 21 plies (moves by both sides), it still considers 12. Bxc7 to be the best move in the ...


3

I think the more general issue is that a winning strategy for you from a position P assigns each possible position where it is your turn some specific move, such that if you start at P and follow that strategy then you will win no matter what moves your opponent makes. A checkmate type of puzzle essentially asks you to find a winning strategy, which means ...


3

According to the Scid vs PC help use menu options: Options / Moves / Show Variation Arrows


3

NO, it is NOT legal to analize an ICCF game position with another human. The only exception is in team tournaments where it is allowed to consult with the team captain and members. According to article 2.15.5 of the rules valid from Jan. 2020: 2.15 Code of conduct ... Obtaining advice from another person about an active game: It is expected that players ...


3

Using Caissabase or the lichess masters database we can see that instead of Nxe4, Nc6 is more popular to avoid this gambit idea (the Urusov gambit) which is.... dubious but not so simple and seemingly scores fine enough. White has additionally scored p decently. Qe7+ has only been played in one game, but seems good (black won that game, and SF12 gives -0.89 ...


2

First, thanks to "Ángel" for going to such great lengths in trying to help me and come up with a solution. After reading some other posts/howtos on the internet (can't remember where exactly), I got it working this way: xboard -fcp "./ssh user@host './start_stockfish'" -fd "/home/user/Remote putting ssh, polyglot and Stockfish.ini ...


2

I have tried to replicate your setup. To this end, I prepared to virtual machines. First one, let's call it xboard, with xboard and polyglot installed, but -while not strictly required- not stockfish, fairymax or other engines. Second one, let's call it stockfish, runs a ssh server and does have stockfish installed. xboard machine is able to connect to ...


2

You need to connect to your server with ssh -X command to enable X forwarding. The details of how this needs to be configured can be found in this answer on Unix and Linux Stack Exchange.


2

If you look at the static evaluation of the position in Stockfish, White gets an advantage of 4.17. The top factors in this position are are: +1.23: King danger. This measures various things, like whether the king has a pawn shelter, how many checks are available, and how many pieces are threatening the area around the king. +0.77: Piece value bonus. This is ...


2

Stockfish with tablebases gives flat 0.00 so it seems highly likely to be a draw. A problem for White is they can't even take the c6 pawn with the king, 1.Kc7 Qh2+ 2.Kxc6 is a draw. So since Black can just keep giving checks and force the white king on awkward squares this seems hard to ever be winning. (especially since Black can always threaten to pick up ...


2

I'd bet a lot of money that somehow one move from either side was stored incorrectly which makes the whole game incorrect. A possible correct version of this game may be 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Nf6 4.Nc3 cxd4 5.Nxd4 a6 6.Be3 e5 7.Nb3 Be7 Or some other permutation of those moves (e.g. play 4...cxd4 one move earlier, I chose this order since it's closer to the ...


2

True, there are no immediate (forced) piece-winning or mating tactics, but... Your position is safe from counterplay. You do have holes on the dark squares around your king, but White doesn't have their dark-squared bishop any more and the other pieces are far away from getting to your king effectively. A weakness only matters if it can be exploited. On the ...


2

Generally, when asking how to win a game, you will ask for a particular player. For example, you can ask: How can White win this game? In fact, that seems to be what you are really asking here. However, this position is a dead position: neither player can achieve checkmate through legal moves, no matter how badly the other player plays. Under FIDE (World ...


1

There is no genuine preference for any black response to white's winning move Bxd6. As always when checked there are three classes of move available: moving the king - no such moves; capturing the checking piece - one move Qxd6; and interposing a piece to block the check - four moves, Qe7, Re7, Be7 and Ne7. Tidily, the white response to all five of black's ...


1

You shouldn't, I don't think. Black has other moves available, such as Be7. You question may be 'Why did N. N. not list all legal moves by black after the key move in the solution of this puzzle?' Often, but not always, it's because one particular move appears (to N. N., in this case) to be extra difficult, or extra neat, and for that reason deserves to be ...


1

I think NNUE engines are right because after Ne6 black can play Rxd6 instead of taking knight(that exchanges all of his major pieces). he loses bishop after Rxd6 but his rook will remain and he has some chance to go on even if that is 1%. but after Raa8 hxg5(the only move because khight on g5 supports king's scape way and there is checkmate threat) Rxc8 Rxc8 ...


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