23

Black wrecks white's pawn structure Black gains in development since he's trading an undeveloped piece for a developed one. Although the center is sill fluid, black's dark square bishop is currently a "bad" bishop. in the short run, white's knight is the more active piece. It removes the support of the c-pawn which opens up some tactical ...


15

Strong positives: Damages white's pawn structure. Paves the way for quick kingside castling. Prevents Nc4, which would centralize the knight and attack e5. Mild positives: Removes a potentially "bad bishop" for a knight that is about to become strong. c3 pawn loses a defender. a3 pawn is attackable. Mild negatives: Opens b-file for your ...


10

It's completely playable below master level, probably playable to IM level and probably useful occasionally as a surprise weapon at GM level. Combined with the English defense it gives black a very solid opening repertoire with very little theory to learn. The only caveat would be to just be careful castling kingside into a strong attack. 22 ply is 11 moves. ...


9

Engines are far better at spotting mistakes than at recognizing "brilliancies". You made a move that is much better than all the alternatives which isn't something obvious like a recapture or a fork in one move, so that's probably what the engine identified as "brilliant". Just don't pay too much attention to it and congratulations for ...


8

While some books give a slightly higher numeric value for the bishop than the knight, an exchange of bishop vs. knight is not regarded as a sacrifice. It depends on the exact position if a bishop or a knight is stronger. So this is simply an exchange. Bxa3 makes the white pawn structure worse. White gets an isolated double pawn, which is bad news for white. ...


7

First off, I think you want to play 2...Bg7. As a general rule of thumb, you should always finish your fianchetto on the next move. It also protects the rook on h8 if the h-file opens. I don't think 2...c5 is a very good move because it locks up the pawn structure and is going to make counterplay in the center more difficult. (2...Nf6 and 2...e5 are probably ...


7

Forget the engines. We are humans (hopefully) and are only interested in how human's play. The King's Indian Defence (KID), a favorite opening of Tal, Fischer and Kasparov (and now played by Nakamura), has a reputation of being unsound by the engines (some positions are +1 and even +1.5) however for white playing precisely is very difficult. For instance, ...


6

As a person who has experience in the Bird's and Dutch openings, I would say that both of them are somewhat bad responses to the Birds or Dutch. In the From's, generally white has the edge but its not as if black doesn't have counterplay. In the Lisitsin, usually something like 1Nf3 f5 2e4 fxe4 3Ng5 Nc6 4d3 e3 is something close to equal. There is a version ...


6

To be honest, brilliant seems like an overstatement for a fairly obvious move. But to answer your question, I think the "brilliancy" is that you actually found the only way to not only save your rook, but even end up winning material. The point is that after 12..Bb4 there is the threat of 13..Rxd2 after which Ne4 will win the knight on c3. The only ...


6

You can punish them all you like, but the players who make these rushes want to mix it up. When they play h2-h4-h5, they're ready and willing to throw the rook on it after ...Nf6xh5. Players who play incorrect, unsound chess are usually pretty good at tactics, and have lots of practice in positions where the material imbalance favors the other side. See, ...


6

Stockfish's @.3484814232843 shouldn't concern Black as much as Morphy's simple plan for White. 1.e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3 e6 4. Nh3 Stockfish might be complaining because White gets free rein in the center, but Morphy said 'two pawns is enough', then as long as White continues developing, he's guaranteed at least equal development, and because it was the ...


5

White doesn't get only one bishop for the queen, but two pieces: a bishop and a knight. Moreover, Black's weak king, White's domination of the center, great outposts for his pieces and lack of prospects for Black's development (especially his rooks) fully compensate the material imbalance.


5

Is Black really that much (or at all?) ahead in terms of development and piece activity? Just counting, there are three minor pieces developed on each side, plus the White queen, while Black is to move and can castle. Pretty equal. Black's three minor pieces surely are active at the moment, but are White's much worse? I don't think so. Most importantly ...


5

The whole point of hypermodern openings like the Benoni is to encourage a big center. If you don't get that you'd probably be better off playing something else. The Dutch leads to unbalanced positions, avoids transpositions and can be learned very quickly. The Tarrasch also. Those sound like better choices.


5

Some points: First forget the engine evaluations. We are humans (hopefully) and are only interested in practical play In practical play, yes an early h4 as in this case is something to think about (but not scared). This is the reason why people usually delay fianchetto at least till the second move in almost all decent openings (like KID or hyper-...


5

As for "both positions seem fine for White": well, Black has a significant material advantage after 5...gxf3, so White has to find some compensation. If you don't have a concrete continuation which demonstrates that compensation, I don't think there's any reason to think the engine evaluation is confused. In both positions, a sensible continuation ...


4

The thing about loosening White's pawn structure, specifically, is that Black is enabled to develop ...Qd8-e7 or ...Qd8-d6 as a threat, when White's replies a3-a4 or Qd1-c1 don't help White. Good chess is a matter of introducing unused force with threats.


4

A possibility that jumps to mind instantly is 26..Qg4, with two threats: Qxg3+ Re2 followed by either Rxf2 or Bxf2+. The only move that prevents both these threats is 27.Kf1, but then black could e.g. play Qh3+ or Rd8. Both moves lead to an easy win. In the position you obtained the most important thing is to make sure white can not solve a threat by ...


4

That specific opening is called the Anderssen Opening: Creepy Crawly Formation, Classical Defense From about 1,000 test engine games it seems that its a remarkably even set up; White : 45.5% Black : 45.5% Draw : 9% Based off that result I would say its very much playable. This is be cause you white usually plays the left side of the board slowly working ...


4

Works for me. Review that game with a person, someone who'll tell you why you should do or not do things, for whom one-millionth of a pawn isn't an issue. For instance, getting the bishop to d3 in one step instead of two. 4. Nf3 and 5. Be2 are grandmasterly, not as simple.


4

This answer is intended to expand upon my comments, and give some concrete lines. Let's discuss the position as I (mistakenly) first thought it was presented: [fen "R7/6p1/P3p1k1/7p/8/6PP/r7/4K3 w - - 0 1"] This position is a draw, no matter who is to move. If White doesn't play a7, then Black's rook will have the option to pick off one of White's ...


3

Any opening is playable as long as you buy into the idea that your only goal in the opening is to reach a playable middlegame, one with rough equality in center control, development, and king safety. Heeding the general opening principles while being alert to tactics will get you to a playable middlegame. This isn't what chess book publishers and authors ...


3

Instead of Qh5+ Black would win by threatening mate with 32 ... Re1. If 33 Qg2 Qh5+ 34 Qh3 Rh1+! 35 Kxh1 Qxh3+ wins easily because the wBg7 also falls. If 33 Qb8+ Kxg7 34 Qb2+ f6 and White's out of checks (note 34 Qe5+ Rxe5 and 35 Qb7+ Qxb7). Even on the last move 36 ... Re1 would win but there are a few more lines to check (find the mates after 37 g4 or ...


3

Well for 1.d4, White's able to win a pawn outright with 2.Bxg5. In 1.e4, the extra tempo gives White better chances to capitalize on Black's dubious move.


3

Interesting position; Activating your king I don't believe is the answer. I think your first goal is try and force the the c2 bishop off the board. corner the black king and create as many potential promotion threats (a , e and h files particularly) I played the position out for a while on a few variations and will attach the cleanest variant; I see the main ...


3

I have several Caro-Kann books and none mention this line. In general, http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/, and https://www.chessgames.com/ are good opening resources. When you're analyzing rarely played lines it's best to just use a database and an engine. That's all I really use anymore anyway. Occasionally, I'll look at book if I don't understand a ...


3

Both approaches will work. In the second approach, you will have better accuracy of your evaluations but you may miss an important move. For example, if 20...Rxc3 positional exchange sacrifice is a strong move, you will probably miss it with a 1-2s quick engine search. In the first approach, you will lose accuracy but you won't miss a strong hidden resource ...


3

If you don't feel comfortable playing against large centers you shouldn't play Benoni nor other openings such as KID (which both, by the way, are good choices if you look for imbalanced positions). I would recommend, based on the proximity of the tournament and your aim for imbalaced positions, to look at Von Hennig-Schara Gambit, which doesn't have a lot of ...


3

"The Pirc Defence" by Mihail Marin (see e.g. https://www.qualitychess.co.uk/products/1/305/the_pirc_defence_by_mihail_marin/), part of the Grandmaster Repertoire series, covers this line from Black's perspective


3

You should know how to evaluate an opening position- center, development, king safety. While an engine can be useful for missed tactics, I trust my own evaluation over any engine in the opening. Lopsided database scores can be a clue that the opening may be difficult for your opponent but they aren't perfect particularly at higher levels. Using a GM ...


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