7

The reason is that after 3. dxe5 fxe5 4. Qh5+ you are in a lot of trouble and already lost. [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. d4 f6 3. dxe5 fxe5 4. Qh5+ Ke7 (4...g6 5. Qxe5+ Kf7 6. Bc4+) 5. Qxe5+ Kf7 6. Bc4+


5

why exchanging the knight f3 is a blunder? It obviously isn't a blunder. I suspect you've made the mistake of thinking that if the website tells you that it evaluates Nxf3 as fractionally lower than Nxg2 then that means that Nxf3 is a blunder. It isn't. A blunder is when your large positive advantage turns negative. A blunder loses you the game from a ...


4

Because you have opposite-colored bishops and it's nearly impossible to win in the endgame. You can, however, take advantage of the weak white king. After 20... Bxc3 the game will most likely continue: [FEN "1r1q1rk1/p4pp1/3p1b1p/2pQ4/4P3/P1P2P2/1P2B1PP/1K1R3R b - - 0 20"] 1... Bxc3 2. b3 Bd4 This will you protect your pawn on d6. You've lost ...


4

The non-technical answer is that once you have such a winning position, the "winning difference" between the best (e.g. winning material) vs a good improving move evaluated by the engine is based on the fact that your position is already extremely winning. You could literally play any decent move and it would not be a mistake. An extreme example ...


4

Be3 is rather passive. It defends f2 and d4 but otherwise doesn't do a lot. Bf4 is much more aggressive. It eyes up the black queen on c7 and pins the d5 pawn threatening an embarrassing c5. Black's response of putting the knight on the rim and pushing the e5 pawn is pretty much forced. Getting the pawn to e5 has taken black 2 moves whereas normally in these ...


3

The reason is because in the situation if Qb6 is played then you could lose the knight. But if you move the knight you will lose the game because Qf2# is checkmate. white moves Nb5 then black will play a6 receiving a knight or the game.


3

Positions with opposite color bishops and heavy pieces are known to be very complicated and double-edged. The tension between two sides can last for a long time because of continuous maneouvering of rooks and queens. Consequently, evaluation of the position depends mostly on the dynamical resources and weaknesses in pawn structure and not on just pawns ...


2

Can Black draw by perpetual checks? Only if white blunders, doesn't see Kf6 and instead plays Kh4. Yes, Kf6 allows black to capture the bishop on h8 but that leads to a swift mate. Blacks best try is to keep taking pawns and checking but eventually he has to exchange queens to avoid mate and White still has one pawn left plus the extra piece to give him the ...


2

Since the first part of your question was already answered, I'll tell you why Bh2 is may be considered "useful". Notice that white's c and e pawns have a strong hold on the d5 square, rendering a d6-d5 pawn push from black impossible. This in turn makes the d6 black pawn a backwards pawn (not protected by any other pawns) and notice that the Bh2 ...


2

..e5 and ..c5 can both be strong moves if followed up consistently. Usually one of them is necessary to avoid a cramped position. In the given position Black has already played both ..e6 and .. c6, pretty much guaranteeing a lost tempo. Also it is not yet clear that the Black Queen belongs on c7. In a Kings Indian formation Black hopes for one of six ...


1

There's a myth in these Kings Indian type positions that Black wants a pawn on e5. Actually, that's not the case; Black wants to keep the long diagonal open for their bishop if possible, and having a pawn on e5 and then making a kingside pawn storm is just the choice they are forced into when they have to give up too much to keep the diagonal open. If you ...


1

It's not so much that Bxc3 is a blunder, as that not doing Qd6 is a blunder. Stockfish gives +4.5 to this position with White to move, and -0.4 after Bxc3, so Bxc3 compared to nothing at all improves your position by 4.1. It's just that Qd6 improves your position even more. Even if a move doesn't give up material, keep in mind that every move costs a tempo. ...


1

The pawn is actually a goner in any case after 1...Qa5 or 1...Qb6 - White can't play 2.c4 since Black can play Rxb2+, breaking the pin with 2. Kc2?? or 2. Kh2?? leads to 2...Rxb2+ 3. Kxb2 Qxc3+ and checkmate, and the pawn is attacked more times than it can be defended. The real difference is that if you take the pawn immediately, White can play 2. b3 ...


1

22. Nxd7+! Fischer trades one advantage for an even bigger one: the invasion of the White Rooks.


1

Ne5 was not a poor move, but indeed not the best. When Ne5 is played, white has an extreme attack with knight, bishop and if needed, queen and can still easily win an exchange after 1. ... Rd6 2. Nc6 Rf6 3. Be5 (close to stockfish play) and easily win the game because blacks defence is not enough, even to Stockfish standards


1

When I move, I always get Error of chess.com, Why? Error means That i will lose, Not invalid move. Nxe6 is winning. You take a piece for free and threaten another piece. Meanwhile black has no threats. [FEN "2r1k3/p2np1b1/1qp1bnpr/1p1p1pN1/1P1P1P1P/N1P1P3/P2R2QR/2B1KB2 w - - 0 1"] 1. Nxe6


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