Hot answers tagged

16

The opening in those games depends on your opponent just as much as you, so with the sample size being so small, don't take the statistic too much into account. The analogy with poker doesn't really work out too well. You definitely want to play "optimally" in chess against beginners! While in poker you can choose between different strategies that ...


14

Is there any value to learning openings as a new player? Yes. The main reason is to get a feel for the kind of patterns of the way the pieces develop in different situations. There are also good reasons to start with highly tactical openings since most of your improvement will come from improving your tactics, most of your wins will come from your tactics (...


13

One of Black's development plans will include moves like Nd7 intending Ne5 hitting the Q and Bishop if the Q is on d3. This will cost White an important tempo in this dynamic opening. Black's plans revolve around control of the c4 square hoping to place a piece on this square. Depending on White's particular move order Black may play b5, Bb7, Nd7, Nb6, Nc4, ...


11

This is a very difficult question, and there are several sides to it. 1: This is the most important advice you will ever hear: Chess is 99% tactics. It is all about tricks, forking and pinning your opponents. I can not count how many times I have played a wonderful opening, gotten some advantage on the long term to lose on some simple blunder. If Bill ...


11

Qd2 is used in these lines to support the Be3, which is typically played to h6 to exchange for the Bg7, followed by a pawn attack on the king-side.


10

You can do something like this in SCID, which is a free program. It takes a little effort, but it's not too bad. First, load the desired database. Then use a filter to select only games from the opening of your choice. You can filter either by a position, or by ECO code, to get the desired opening. Note how many games meet the filter criteria. Next, use ...


8

Such a system doesn't exist exactly, but a few similar concepts do. There are many reasons, but the main reason is that it's not possible to classify chess games like this in any useful way. Yes, you could classify them based on the first move -- but who cares? Only 1.c4, 1.d4, 1.e4 and 1.Nf3 are really important, and they often transpose into each other (1....


7

You should focus on understanding the openings principles- center, development, king safety. If you understand those ideas you'll usually be able to find good moves even if you don't know the theory. Play openings that lead to open and tactical positions because those are the ones that will help you improve the fastest. 1.e4 with white. 1.e4, e5 with black. ...


6

If White goes for 11.Nc7+, then Black can reply 11...Kd8 Nxa8 Nxc1, however if Black played 10...Nxc1 directly, 11.Nxc7+ would win an extra pawn. Note 10...c6 Bxe2 cxd5 would have been OK for black.


6

A lichess study would be a good way to do this.


6

White probably intends to play e6 anyway, to launch an attack against the light squares. Whether Black takes this Pawn or allows exf7, White will want to play Nf3-e5 as part of his followup, and if f3 has been provoked, he will need to play f3-f4, losing another tempo and obstructing his dark Bishop.


5

FM Graham Burgess suggests the following when facing this kind of unorthodox but modest opening from White: play as though you (as Black) gained a tempo somewhere. In other words, you now have an advantage, but it's not much; therefore you should try to keep the initiative, but don't play too aggressively trying to refute the opponent's opening. So after 1. ...


5

One of the key principles of opening play is that control of the center is vitally important. If one of the players has complete control of the center then they can much more easily launch an attack and it is much more difficult for the other player to defend. A white knight on c3 supports/attacks e4 and d5. A white knight on f3 supports/attacks e5 and d4. ...


5

Learn CQL (http://www.gadycosteff.com/cql/), then write a program to automate the process


5

If the point is to disallow Nf3 in positions when White pushes e6 and Black takes with exf, it does not achieve that, as Black wasted one tempo on the bishop retreat Bf5-e4-h7 and White can also waste a tempo by playing f2-f3-f4 and then Nf3. There is an error in your tempo-count. If Black plays Bf5-e4-h7 instead of Bf5-h7, he loses one tempo. If White ...


4

I play systems such as this myself. In your example White has been very unambitious and you are certainly equal at least, but you do not have the advantage that you may feel entitled to. It is worth bearing in mind that nothing is weak unless it can be attacked, and this is true of the doubled pawns here. By focusing on them I believe you are wasting your ...


4

What should you play? You play chess! You can't have a prepared answer for every nonsense move your opponent may play. If you can't easily equalize as Black against 1.Na3, then your chess skills should be improved somehwere else other than the opening


4

With ...e5, Black: Opens a diagonal for the c8-bishop, and Fights for central control. Both of these adhere to chess principles, so planning for ...e5 is a very natural thing for Black.


4

Without giving a long, drawn out explanation, the simple answer is that you're decreasing the mobility of the queen. The queen only has three legal moves from d3 and all of them waste time. Qd2 loses a tempo since you could have played Qd2 the move before. Same with Qe2. Qd1 wastes two moves. The value of moves comes from the value of the pieces and the ...


3

Yes, there is. It derives from the Encyclopedia of Chess Openings and the codes they used to classify openings. You can find a comprehensive list of the ECO codes here.


3

For a more meaningful answer, it'd be a great idea to know what your current skill level is. That being said: Knowing an opening is not about knowing "what's on the book". If you can't find the correct response when your opponent deviates, then to all practical effects it's as if you didn't know anything the opening, no matter how depth into the ...


3

When you're new to the game, rote memorisation of a bunch of lines in an opening: puts you in a reasonable position in the midgame if your opponent plays the moves you learnt; takes a huge amount of your time; and is incredibly boring. It's a fantastic way to kill any enthusiasm you might otherwise have in the game, unless you are a very specific type of ...


3

I prefer to use Graphviz ( either in the online editor or downloadable software. You can create a flowchart with all moves and transpositions, here is an example : This is an excellent answer which explains how to use it. If you have difficulty in visualize moves without the board, you can add screenshots of important position in the flowchart. Lichess ...


2

I'm adding another answer because although this opening is not refuted, I believe it's quite close and OP will be interested. Edit with better example: this line of the Najdorf, also played in the TCEC Season 18 superfinal, might very well be "busted". [FEN ""] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Be7 8. Qf3 ...


2

Reshevsky once took a full hour for his first move. No reason for it. Sometimes GMs play the opening slow. I would guess that it is to ensure they do not make a silly mistake or fall into a trap early that would lose the game.


2

1.f3 PROS The only pros of the opening is some small center support. CONS This opening weakens the king's safety. The f pawn is an important shelter of the e1-h4 diagonal and the g1-b7 diagonal so moving it makes the kingside pawn structure destroyed. This opening don't open any lines fo development, and it blocked the knight! Wasted tempo. SUGGESTION FOR ...


2

Another well-known example is the following: [fen ""] 1. f4 {Bird's Opening} 1... e5 {From Gambit} 2. e4 {King's Gambit} 2... d5 {Falkbeer Counter Gambit} 3. exd5 exf4 {King's Gambit Accepted} A total of 5 distinct names. Bird's Opening From Gambit King's Gambit Falkbeer Counter Gambit King's Gambit Accepted


2

A variation of the Caro Kann, Advance: Tal Variation called Caveman Variation is a "gambit" where White can gambit mere pawns, or whole pieces, but probably will mate. If Black should go for the rook, the imbalance most often is 2 rooks + 2 pawns for the queen in a structure that favors the queen. [FEN ""] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. ...


2

the fried liver is one of the 2 only real gambit stockfish likes, or the queens gambit. it appears that the benko gambit is one gambit that have big pressure against whites Q side


2

A lot of useful and excellent advice has been provided. Chess is a war game whose object is to destroy (checkmate) the enemy King! So, mobilise your army and/or demobilise your opponent's army. Try to seize the centre of the board, centralised pieces are more powerful! Start with just one or two basic openings like e4:e5, d4:d5 until you get a feel for the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible