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15

Wikipedia says the following: Exclamation points ("!") indicate good moves—especially ones which are surprising or involve particular skill. Hence annotators are usually somewhat conservative with the use of this symbol. (emphasis mine). 2. c4 is the most played move after 1. d4 d5, therefore it doesn't receive an exclamation mark.


11

You're referring to ...Bc8-g4 as a threat. The only threat it makes is ...Bg4xf3, losing time and the bishop pair. While White has d4 under wraps with a pawn at c3, theere's no ...Nc6-d4 coming to pressure the pinned knight. The f6-knight has to move to a lesser square to prepare ...Qd8-f6, which is nothing because Nb1-d2 is right at hand to prevent a ...


10

It's completely playable below master level, probably playable to IM level and probably useful occasionally as a surprise weapon at GM level. Combined with the English defense it gives black a very solid opening repertoire with very little theory to learn. The only caveat would be to just be careful castling kingside into a strong attack. 22 ply is 11 moves. ...


8

The Evans Gambit is probably one of the most sound. It's still occasionally played at GM level and most of the critical lines are rarely if ever tested. The Vienna Gambit and Blackmar–Diemer are probably playable. The Scotch gambit is playable although I wouldn't be surprised if there isn't a forced draw. With black the Benko is probably sound and the ...


8

To try to give a concrete example consider Sax-Seirawan, Brussels 1988 [Event "World Cup"] [Site "Brussels"] [Date "1988.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Sax, Gyula"] [Black "Seirawan, Yasser"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2610"] [BlackElo "2595"] [ECO "B09"] [FEN ...


8

As an amateur player, you should know the connotation that 2...Nf6 (The Petrov defense) has a reputation of being more boring and more of a draw than 2...Nc6 (leading to the Ruy Lopez, Italian, and Scotch games). However, this really doesn't apply at the amateur level. In fact, you're much more likely to win or lose than draw, unlikely to the masters' ...


7

This move order, without e4 and Bg7, was employed by Botvinnik in the Tal-Botvinnik 1960 WCC match. If you're interested, check it out here. In his book on the match, Tal recommends going for a quick h6-g5-Nh5 maneuver to win the bishop pair before the kingside knight can be maneuvered to c4, which (in conjunction with the bishop on g3) puts uncomfortable ...


7

First off, I think you want to play 2...Bg7. As a general rule of thumb, you should always finish your fianchetto on the next move. It also protects the rook on h8 if the h-file opens. I don't think 2...c5 is a very good move because it locks up the pawn structure and is going to make counterplay in the center more difficult. (2...Nf6 and 2...e5 are probably ...


7

Forget the engines. We are humans (hopefully) and are only interested in how human's play. The King's Indian Defence (KID), a favorite opening of Tal, Fischer and Kasparov (and now played by Nakamura), has a reputation of being unsound by the engines (some positions are +1 and even +1.5) however for white playing precisely is very difficult. For instance, ...


6

You can punish them all you like, but the players who make these rushes want to mix it up. When they play h2-h4-h5, they're ready and willing to throw the rook on it after ...Nf6xh5. Players who play incorrect, unsound chess are usually pretty good at tactics, and have lots of practice in positions where the material imbalance favors the other side. See, ...


6

When Black plays a first move, it's usually directly related to White's first move. 1.d4 means White can't play d2-d3, so e4 is more up for grabs, which makes 1...f5 palatable. If White plays Bird's 1. f4, then From's 1...e5 2. fxe5 d6 is promising. White doesn't have that type of reply against the Dutch. Take the Budapest. 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e5, and if 3. dxe5,...


6

Two sound gambits for Black: The Marshall Attack in the Spanish: [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4 14. g3 Qh3 This is the main line. Be aware that you need to know lots of theory to play this opening, as most lines are analysed ...


6

Stockfish's @.3484814232843 shouldn't concern Black as much as Morphy's simple plan for White. 1.e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3 e6 4. Nh3 Stockfish might be complaining because White gets free rein in the center, but Morphy said 'two pawns is enough', then as long as White continues developing, he's guaranteed at least equal development, and because it was the ...


6

It is a matter of choice Many grandmasters (e.g. Vishwanathan Anand) have consistently played 1.c4 e5 with Black. Others favour the KID or other defenses : Hedgehog (with b6), symmetrical English (1.c4 c5), Pseudo-Nimzo (with Nf6 and e6), Pseudo-Grünfeld (with Nf6 and d5), Réti (with e6 and d5) or Slav-like (with c6 and d5) defenses... There is no definitive ...


5

You played 1. g4 and you're not pleased with a "weird position". Do you know why 1. g4 has any value other than comic? You're aiming to post a knight on e4, and the g4-pawn is there to knock down ...f5. I mean, if they're playing ...e5 and not ...d5 to give you the typical c4 counterplay, you ought to be happy with that because they're not ...


5

Is Black really that much (or at all?) ahead in terms of development and piece activity? Just counting, there are three minor pieces developed on each side, plus the White queen, while Black is to move and can castle. Pretty equal. Black's three minor pieces surely are active at the moment, but are White's much worse? I don't think so. Most importantly ...


5

Some points: First forget the engine evaluations. We are humans (hopefully) and are only interested in practical play In practical play, yes an early h4 as in this case is something to think about (but not scared). This is the reason why people usually delay fianchetto at least till the second move in almost all decent openings (like KID or hyper-...


5

With e2-e4, you create "holes" at d3 and d4 that can never again be attacked by pawns. Any enemy pieces that land on those holes have to be kicked out by your pieces, which is harder to do (because every piece runs away from a pawn job). World champion Botvinnik used to set pawns on c4-d3-e4 which we call The Botvinnik Triangle. The world champion ...


5

As for "both positions seem fine for White": well, Black has a significant material advantage after 5...gxf3, so White has to find some compensation. If you don't have a concrete continuation which demonstrates that compensation, I don't think there's any reason to think the engine evaluation is confused. In both positions, a sensible continuation ...


5

There's nothing special about this type of position. Play sound, solid chess. Activate your pieces, put your king into safety and occupy the center without overextending. You'll have an easier time than normal achieving an equalized middlegame


5

Objectively speaking, 2...Nc6 is the strongest reply. That's why it's preferred by most top players. 2...Nf6 is an interesting alternative, but it often leads to more drawish positions after 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4, but White can also go for 4.Nxf7!?, which is an inferior line, but very sharp and it can put you in big trouble if you don't know it well. So it ...


4

The line that you refer to is probably 1.b4 e5 2.Bb2 Bxb4 3. Bxe5 Nf6.. I recall some early opening books saying that this was a bad defence because it surrendered a center pawn. The more modern view is that Black does get a very fast development in this line which is quite dangerous. I gave up the Polish when this started to become well-known. Until then I ...


4

That specific opening is called the Anderssen Opening: Creepy Crawly Formation, Classical Defense From about 1,000 test engine games it seems that its a remarkably even set up; White : 45.5% Black : 45.5% Draw : 9% Based off that result I would say its very much playable. This is be cause you white usually plays the left side of the board slowly working ...


4

"If you look at the first move, you can see that the two openings are similar, due to the fact the initial pawn structures of both openings are actually mirror images of each other." That's one of the most patzerish things I've ever read in a book written by a strong player. Flip the board around, and I don't think anyone (not even Simon Williams) ...


4

What everyone has said about the "hole" on d4 is logical; However looking at what Magnus Carlsen has done recently, e4 may be just as good! I am referring to: 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e4 Usually e4 is played after Black has committed d7-d6 blocking the dark squared bishop as it was thought that Black is immediately equal after 4...Bc5 or 4......


4

Here are some lines. They seem to be the mainlines from the master database on Lichess. White is not winning, but the opening phase went White's way. ...Qd6 [fen ""] 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 (5...a6 6. g3 Bg4 7. Bg2 Nc6 8. O-O O-O-O 9. h3 Bh5 10. Bf4) c6 6. Ne5 Nbd7 7. Nc4 Qc7 8. Qf3 {note that this move prevents .....


4

Hu.h, that's weird. Your opponent asked the same question earlier. I play 1. e3 and get a reversed French, or 1. g3 and get a reversed King's Indian? What are the advantages in that? There are none. Grandmaster Larsen used to play 1. a3 to steer for a Reversed Najdorf in the '50s, and while he was glad when it happened, he found it was nothing special. Your ...


4

Exclamation (!) is a highlight in analysis. Either it indicates strong move, or it is also possible to indicate unexpected move. Something to which opponent is totally unprepared. Something which will be followed by inaccuracy (?). This could be different depending on what exact game it is. What will follow after provoking move? Exclamated move could be not ...


3

I have several Caro-Kann books and none mention this line. In general, http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/, and https://www.chessgames.com/ are good opening resources. When you're analyzing rarely played lines it's best to just use a database and an engine. That's all I really use anymore anyway. Occasionally, I'll look at book if I don't understand a ...


3

The Luccini Gambit sacs a rook. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. d3 f5 5. Ng5 f4 6. Nf7 Qh4 The Nakhmanson gambit sacs some pawns and a bishop [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nf3 Nc6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. Nc3 dxc3 7. Bxf7+ Kxf7 8. Qd5+


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