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18

Chess strategy is complex and has several ingredients mingling at the same time. It is true that 3 c3 helps white mantaining two center pawns if black decides for a c:d4 pawn exchange. But black isn't forced to that and the move c3 has some incovenients. To list just two: blocks the c3 square which is the natural place for developing the Q-side knight; ...


5

Move 3 is a bit early for such positional evaluations, but some food for thoughts: after 3...cd 4.ed, e7-e6 will be played, rather sooner than later but then the pawn structure in the center is fixed, which makes it hard for Black to "exploit" his extra central pawn. Any expansion with ...f6 and ...e5 is out of question for at least the next 20 ...


3

Most likely 4...d5 is a little bit better. Why do you want your queen to b6 at all? Usually developing the queen early in the opening is not recommended (for various different reasons) and I think this is no exception. Queen is offsides on b6. It's premature developing, you don't yet know where the queen belongs. After 4...d5 5.e5, the most common moves for ...


3

Just a small addendum: As a Bf4 player who never plays London but his own obscure systems (which are extremely dangerous for both sides - in the days before computer preparation, I clobbered a few GMs with them I only play e3. My own experience is that the most doubly-edged Black plan is pestering b2 with his queen. e3 (developing, also keeping the option ...


3

The number of central pawns is one of the factor that matter in the evaluation of a position, but it's definitely not the only one. While I think both 3.e3 and 3.c3 are playable, 3.e3 helps your development, while 3.c3 does not. If Black takes on d4, White gets an amazing outpost on the e5 square. In fact, Black would wish he could put his e6 pawn on the &...


3

The idea is that c3 supports d4 and if black plays cxd4 then white recaptures with the c-pawn leaving white with the better center. If white is able to carry out that plan then he will have a clear opening advantage. However, in actual play, the idea is a little slow. After 2...d5 white really doesn't have a good answer. 3. e5 just gives black an improved ...


3

I think there was good points and explanation so far, I will just add few. I recently also started to play Alapin, and there are two points two that: 1- make your opponent uncomfortable! as mentioned before the structure and form of the play is not what black players are looking for, and it make it uncomfortable to face it. 2- Also, white is trying to avoid ...


3

OK, so after a bit more research I have concluded that this variation is in fact playable for White, even with perfect play from Black! Here's my analysis: The critical line is [FEN ""] 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 d4 3.Nce2 e5 4.Ng3 Be6 5.Nf3 f6 6.c3 In this position, we're threatening to win a pawn with 7.cxd4 exd4 8.Qa4+ Nc6 9.Bb5. Black has a couple of ways ...


2

The opening 1.Nc3 is much better than people think, and I have had very good results with it, especially if I pick the opponent. The perfect choice is someone strong enough to try and refute it but not strong enough to do so. The line you mention with 4..Be6 is the only line that worries me, but it only appears if Black is either very well informed or else ...


2

You should take a look at the Kveinis variation. I play it, and it is a good and surprising variation, with a lot of tactical traps.


2

I found two sources for Polyglot opening books: Richard Pijl has released his opening book alongside The Baron 3.43, which he says is almost identical to the version that played in the 2018 WCCC. Read more about these here. Sourceforge claims to have a polyglot book collection for download here. The main page is here. EDIT: Found two more here. The ...


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