Hot answers tagged

25

There are no checkmates from 0-3 ply. 4 ply: 8 checkmates, 197,281 total nodes 5 ply: 347 checkmates, 4,865,609 total nodes 6 ply: 10,828 checkmates, 119,060,324 total nodes 7 ply: 435,767 checkmates, 3,195,901,860 total nodes 8 ply: 9,852,036 checkmates, 84,998,978,956 total nodes 9 ply: 400,191,963 checkmates, 2,439,530,234,167 total nodes "checkmates" ...


13

This sequence of integers is known as A079485 in the On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS) and numbers up to and including 13 ply are known with various references available.


9

There's no known recipe that works for everyone for how to approach the Sicilian (or any new opening) as a newcomer to the opening, but it definitely helps if you concretize your target even more than what you've described in the OP. To do that, you might find the following general considerations helpful, specially given that Sicilian is a vast and rich ...


8

Here's a simple Python program that answers the question but is slow, taking 40 minutes to run to 5 plies on my laptop (and increasing at least 30-fold per additional ply). A nice thing is that it prints out the games, if you need that. I could post the output here but didn't want to make a 347-line long answer... :-) import chess from chess import pgn def ...


7

The top person that I know for this kind of analysis is François Labelle, who has computed many numbers associated with chess (including an estimate of the maximum growth rate of the number of chess games as a function of ply) and in particular has computed the number of checkmates up to ply 13. For values up to ply 12, see the figure in http://wismuth.com/...


5

Note: Discussions are primarily from black's perspective. It may be relevant to remind that one way or the other, most often, the Sicilian continues with white preparing the d4 pawn push, which leads to a trade of the c5-d4 pawns. Common starting lines are shown in the following diagram: [title "common starting lines"] [fen ""] 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 (2......


5

Adapted from here. A gambit is said to be 'sound' if it is capable of resulting in an advantage against the opponent. There are three general criteria in which a gambit is often said to be sound: Time gain: the player accepting the gambit must take time to obtain the sacrificed material and possibly must use more time to reorganize his pieces after the ...


4

If you start playing the sicilian, I wouldn't recommend to become familiar with Najdorf and Sveshnikov. Both are very complex openings and it takes a huge amount of time to get familiar even with the main lines in both of them. Apart, I can recommend several things: 1.) To get familiar with plans more then variations, the best thing is to analyse games ...


3

Aron Nimzowitsch's book My System has more early game principles which give excellent guidance. Two important ones which would help you fix your problems are: Over protection. If you over protect your central pawns then you aren't going to lose them Prophylaxis. This means trying to anticipate your opponent's plans and good moves and trying to prevent them. ...


2

I don't think there is anything wrong with the Scandinavian itself. The reason why it's not often played at top level is that there are "improved versions" in the Rubinstein French and Caro-Kann Defence, which will leave you with the same pawn structure but all those queen moves in the opening are not needed


1

Bent Larsen said the Sicilian defense is an opening trick. Referring to an open Sicilian where White trades his d-pawn for Blacks c-pawn. Suddenly Black has a pawn majority in the center and if he can, say trade the d-pawn for White's e-pawn he can then get his e-pawn to occupy the center; thus getting an advantage. Bobby Fischer said the Sicilian is not ...


1

There are great answers to your question already, but to give you a concrete opening advice, you can look into the Kalashnikov variation (Nc6 with e5). Why is that a good choice: you don't need much theory - just learn the ideas from any of the good players who are playing this opening you develop your pieces very fast securing you a full game where you ...


1

I would add to vs97's answer that not all sound openings lead to an advantage. Indeed, when playing Black, we are often happy with an equal game, thus defences that lead us there are "sound". Some openings that don't give anything special for White are still considered "sound" (I don't think anyone would say the London System is unsound). So I would say ...


1

There may be a psychological element. My impression is that 1.f4 is often played by weaker players, just to avoid the main line "book" that they fear from a strong opponent (although I dont want to impute that motive to anyone here). On the other hand, I think that 1..f5 is often played by strong opponents to prevent a weak White player from playing it safe.


1

We all start as beginners, as we all start on a small bicycle - not driving a car. The Colle or the London are good places to start and learn how and what along with some wins. As we grow and mature as chess players, then we can move on to more challenging or "sharp" openings. Ones that fit our chess personality. Some past grandmasters were attacking ...


1

So far, I’ve had success with the Pachman System, d5 g6 Bg7 e5 Ne7. If they play d4 before you can get the e5 off, you can go for Nf6, Nd7, and Nb6, allowing you to capture any c4 pawn, and get a good position while they recapture.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible