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12

White is enjoying a space advantage in the center, but not anymore after ...Nxe4. It would be the "equivalent" of playing a ...d5 push, which unfortunately doesn't work in this position. White can reply to 1...Nxe4 with either 2.Nxe4 d5 3.Bd3 dxe4 Bxe4, which would leave Black with an at least equal position, or with 2.Bxf7+ Rxf7 3.Nxe4 which would ...


11

This table can be thought of as a tabular representation of an opening tree of in-theory moves where the rows (y-axis) represent the flow of the game and the columns (x-axis) refer to variations/branches in the tree that can occur. The author in your quote indicated that 2...exf4 spans a family 24 variations/sub-variations that are noteworthy (and considered ...


10

Pirc in considered an inferior opening for black mainly because white gets more space and centre control. After Nxe4 Nxe4 d5 Bd3 dxe4 Bxe4, one pair of knights is exchanged, which negates the space advantage a bit (fewer pieces on the board, so space is less important). Moreover, the resulting pawn structure is what can be obtain from the Scandinavian, but ...


8

The principle is to not bring out the queen too early when it can be easily attacked. In this situation there's no easy way for black to attack the queen on d4, so it's not too early. So instead of being a weakness, the queen in a central square is a huge strength. A very similar phenomenon happens in the following line of the Scotch game where white ...


7

One thing I can think of is that after 2. Nc3 you still have a chance to transpose to main lines after 2 ... d5 3. d4, so it's a tad more flexible. I know it's a stretch, but if your opponent is (for whatever reason) afraid of the two knights variation, they might not play 2. .. d5 and opt for 2. ... g6 or other inferior move.


7

If you compare games of past masters with modern master games you will find that the modern masters are playing at a significantly higher level. This is because modern chess masters are able to draw inspiration from and refine the ideas of the older masters. If they weren't doing this, chess theory would become stagnant and new ideas would be few and far ...


6

If you want, chess.com allows you to play from a custom opening position against a computer, which you can choose your level. If you need help with it, go here. You can also send a game to a friend. https://support.chess.com/article/684-how-can-i-play-the-computer-from-a-custom-position Lichess does a similar thing. Create your personal board, and press ...


6

It would be difficult. So you go into your first top-level tournament and get Black in the first round. No problem, you'll just play your Caro-Kann. Play goes 1. e4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. cxd5 cxd5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. d4. You've just transposed into a line of the Alapin Variation of the Sicilian. In the second round you're White and play 1.c4. Your opponent plays 1...e5 ...


6

I think the answer is threefold: First white usually has a development advantage in the Catalan because he moves first, so any Black attack would not be so dangerous. Second, white has a space advantage in the Catalan with his pawn on d4, while in the Dragon black's d-pawn is on d6. Third, and probably very important, is the fact that it is not easy for ...


6

It is certainly playable. The main drawback is that you give White the choice between two very different mainline openings: 3.Nf3 transposes to a Sicilian, where Black is already committed to e6 (Kan, Taimanov or Scheveningen, but no Najdorf, Sveshnikov, etc.). 3.d5 reaches a Benoni structure and may transpose to a mainline Benoni if White later plays c4. ...


6

Aggressive openings often rely too much on preparation and most top players would rather play something "quieter", trying to outplay their opponent later on, rather than exposing themselves to being surprised by a novelty thier opponent spent hours or even days analyzing at home. Also note that the theory of some of those "sharper" ...


5

d5 is a very good Benoni for white (if there is such thing as a not-very-good Benoni for white) exactly as Arne mentioned, because white can maneuver his knight to c4. Usually arises from a different move order though, 1. d4 c5 2. d5 e6 3. e4, and this is the reason why 1. ... c5 is not great against 1. d4. You'd want to wait for that pawn to arrive on c4.


5

All positions in the Sicilian Dragon where Black managed to put a rock-solid central pawn on d5 are considered low-risk! Domination of the center is critical for an attack on the side to succeed. The Dragon Sicilian would be considered solid if White didn't have the option to go for long castling and a pawn storm on the kingside. An analogous plan for Black ...


5

In addition to the other answers, there are a few sites to consider. These include annotation and comment features as mentioned by the OP. Listudy.org Upload a PGN and then you play the computer interactively. You play moves from your repertoire and the computer plays the opponent moves. This is also open source. ChessTempo.com Similar functionality in the &...


5

Lichess also has several thematic tournaments throughout the week. As an example take a look at this thematic Italian game arena tournament: When you open the tournament, the opening is mentioned in the upper left corner if there is one: It is a link so you can click it to see the mentioned opening. Alternatively you can create your own tournament with a ...


5

FM Andrey Terekhov's Two Knights Defense repertoire on Chessable uses this variation against 4.d3. That repertoire deserves to be more widely known: it's one of the best on Chessable, the author updates it frequently, and it's free! In the introductory text of 4.d3 h6 he notes: In the beginning, this line has been mostly used as a surprise weapon, but in ...


4

There is already an offline program which has a lot of my ideas implemented: http://www.chesspositiontrainer.com/index.php/en/features But there is no good online tool which comes even close to that, let alone surpassing the linked offline tool. And I think an online tool, which stores the individual repertoire databases on a serve, would be much better, ...


3

No player knows "all" the popular openings. Players have repetoires that include the range of openings that they want to play. Even with fairly complete repetoires it is possible to have to play ad hoc anyway. For example, moves like 1. b4 and 1. g4 (the "Spike") can throw a player out of book right away. Bent Larsen frequently played 1. ...


3

The Whale variation [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2. c4 is quite an offbeat opening. It shares obvious similarities with the English opening, and it sometimes transposes, but it has some serious drawbacks. The obvious one is the gaping hole it leaves on d4. Another one is that it leads to very closed positions, which intermediate players usually do not fin ...


3

When chess players reach a certain level, they will know how to play against non mainstream openings(often also they can figure many things over the board as well). Therefore, if you play anything other than e4,d4,Nf3, or c4, the black player will be fine as the other moves are objectively not as good and white will find it hard to get any edge. So basically ...


3

Disclaimer: there might be other ideas too. I used to play this some time ago against sicilian. My idea was that I liked closed sicilian positions (2. Nc3) if black did not play the "main" setup against it (that is, 2. ... Nc6, 3. ... g6 etc). So with Ne2, I still could play the closed variation against, for example, 2. ... e6 and 3... d5, and ...


2

Check out this website for more information: https://thechessworld.com/articles/openings/the-keres-variation-against-the-sicilian-defense/


2

https://www.chess.com/openings This opening explorer is so incredibly comprehensive and intuitive that I cannot imagine anything better. Just make sure you use the website, not the mobile app. The app is trash. The website is better optimized for mobile than the mobile app.


2

Given that you are even asking this question, I am going to be a bit presumptuous and guess you are, like me, not a highly rated (elo > 2000) player. For chess books that are not about opening theory, I would not worry too much about the age of the book. Sure, the occasional study or evaluation has been adjusted based on computer engines, but these are ...


2

Well, why shouldn't it? It's a developping move that recaptures the pawn. "Don't move your queen early" is not really a "principle". The correct "principle" would be "activate your pieces better and faster than your opponent", which often involves some rules of thumb like "don't move your queen early" or &...


1

This position also arises from the Old Steinitz variation of the Ruy Lopez. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. d4 exd4 5. Qxd4 White has achieved the Ruy dream pawn structure and a space advantage. Likely followups are either c4 or Nc3 then Nd5. Black may give back the bishop-pair to eliminate the strong Knight.


1

You can't really "prove" it. But, presumably, players want to play the best move, so which move is more often played may be an indication of which move the players think is best. I looked at two databases with master games, and the most popular moves after 1.e4 in each were c5, e5, e6, and c6, in that order. This supports the first half of your ...


1

There are some openings where you can castle to the queenside with Black and your opponent typically castles kingside. For example, Botvinnik variation in the Semi-Slav defence. For white, the choice is wider. Zemish variation in King's Indian, main lines in most variations of the Sicilian defence, especially the ones where White play Bg5 or Be3 right away (...


1

Finding out the entire list of common openings is practically impossible. Many players often play by their own strengths, and one opening someone plays might have queenside castling, while others might not, vice versa. That being said, the most common openings and deviations from these are Sicilian, and queens pawn d4 openings. There is no way to accurately ...


1

There are theme tournaments on ICCF. Example for the Alapin variation of the Sicilian. However, it is correspondence chess, which might not be your cup of tea.


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