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7

Same as in Nimzo-Indian. Bxc3 has two different effects that must be weighted against each other: The white pawn structure is dead meat now, especially the Pc4 will have a nightmare. The attack can be done exactly like in the Nimzo, although some Na5 is far beyond the horizon. Even better, the Nimzo typical Pd4 is already on d5 (so to say), so White has no ...


6

Those lines can be any opening variation; suppose player A has a bad record with White against player B, being defeated in some main lines which are hard to avoid otherwise. Player A may then opt to choose the King's Indian Attack, to avoid said lines. As for why it's rarely used at top level: it is relatively easy with Black to get a playable position with ...


5

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c6 followed by 3...d5 is a reasonnable and legitimate move order to enter the Slav defense. I have used it regularly at Fide master level. As with every move order transposition, it has pluses and minuses that will guide your choice depending on your taste. For instance, 1...Nf6 makes it less easy for White to play a London set up : an early 2....


4

"What should White do about this?" In the King's Gambit, the answer to this question is typically, "Attack!" This is an offshoot of the Quaade, rather than the Quaade proper, coming from the Fischer defense (4. ... d6) move order. The idea behind ...d6 is to prevent Ne5. So White determines to just go ahead and ignore the threats and ...


4

Black can only transpose to the Grunfeld if you play Nc3, so there are other candidate moves you can try to prove Blacks play is unsound. (The idea being that we want to play e4 against Nxd5 and Black can't play Nd5xc3 or if Qxd5 then Nc3 gains time). a. 4.f3 b. 4.Nf3 c. 4.h4!? etc. 4.f3 seems the most annoying as the thread of e4 requires immediate ...


3

The inclusion of 1.a4 a5 doesn't alter much the evaluation of the position, but it will affect the choice of openings. Both sides' choices are reduced because the queenside is less flexible. Probably White will want to play 2.e4 and not 2.d4. Indeed, most openings after 1.d4 include a rapid c2-c4 to fight for the center, but here that move would come with a ...


3

You don't "need" to exchange your dark-squared bishop, but it is definitely a great option to consider. A "standard" Benoni play would consist of some sort of ...d6 and ...e6 play on the center, but White is probably going to be comfortable there and has many options available. Another option available to Black is to counter White's space ...


2

This is effectively a pawn-down gambit line for Black. If you're going to play it, be psychologically prepared. White does not have to go for the Grunfeld if they don't want to. The key line is 4. Qa4+, and then: 4...c6 5. dxc6 is a pawn down gambit. 5...Nxc6 6. e3 - Black has a slight lead in development and White's queen is somewhat exposed, but White ...


2

1...c5 is a great move that fights for the center even better perhaps than 1...e5. By playing ...c5, White will only be able to play d4 either by trading one of his central pawns for a side pawn or by preparing it with c3 (a move the b1 knight won't be happy about). On the other hand, 1...c5 is not a developping move (and does not help development at all), ...


2

This video gives some insight into black's ideas Chess Opening for Black: The Gurgenidze System a well known idea is to exchange the c8 Bishop with the help of h5 when white goes for f4 and then e5 after black plays d5 [FEN ""] 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 c6 4.f4 d5 5.e5 h5 6.Nf3 Bg4 7. Be3 Nh6 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 Nf5 10. Bf2 h4 11. Bd3 e6 The g7 ...


2

The early Nd2 gives some breathing room for your a1 rook [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 Nf6 3. e3 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 Bf5 8. Qc1 (5. Nd2 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 g6 8. e4) Notice how black cannot easily harass your queen and get a lead in development with Bf5 in the early Nd2 case


2

There are probably several ways of obtaining an advantage but the most convincing one I can come up with is this: [fen "r1bqkb1r/ppp2ppp/1nn5/4p3/2B5/3P1N2/PPP2PPP/RNBQ1RK1 w kq - 2 7"] 7.Bb5 Bd6 8.Bxc6+ bxc6 9.Nxe5 Bxe5 10.Re1 Qe7 (10...f6 11.d4 O-O 12.dxe5 Qxd1 13.Rxd1 fxe5) 11.Kh1 O-O 12.f4 f6 13.fxe5 fxe5 14.Be3 In the position after 10.Re1, ...


1

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c6 is best After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 I think 2...c6 is the only reasonable move order to try to get Slav defense. I would consider this not ideal as you allow 3.Bf4 which gives White quite an interesting version of the London System, as a c6-d5 pawn structure isn't ideal vs the London when black is usually trying to exploit Whites slightly weakened ...


1

I looked this opening up about a week ago or so, all I could find was that lichess study and a 4chan thread. Seems to be more of a meme opening. Looks extremely dubious as well.


1

In his early days, Fischer would use it to avoid the French Defense, for example. It's not uncommon for e4 players to transpose into it in the face of any of the half-open defenses (French, Sicilian, Caro-Kan, etc.) they hadn't yet found a line they wanted to trust. Or for d4 players to steer away from lines they're uncomfortable playing (KIA-to-Catalan ...


1

It's a lot easier for a beginner to play the first 10 moves of the London System than it is if they were playing a complicated opening with lots of sidelines. If you open on e5, you might have to learn quite a lot of different openings depending on black's response, e.g. the Sicilian for 1..c5, the French for 1..e6, the Ruy Lopez for 1..e5, the Caro-Khan ...


1

White's position is more flexible. 3...e6 is not an horrible move, of course. But it restricts Black's actve possibilities (Bc8 is locked in, Nf6 is pinned) without putting pressure on White as 3...c5 or 3...Ne4 would. As a consequence, White has a wide choise how to continue. 4.c4 would reach a QGD without exploiting the move order, while 4.Nf3 or 4.Bd3 ...


1

Indian Castling is derived from Shatranjan ( Not Shatranj ). ShadYantra is the actual game from which more advanced form of game called Shatranjan was derived by Kautilya (*Chanakya) some 2300 yrs ago. Chaturanga and Shatranj are variants. In Shatranjan, Kings can move like Knights with the help of Royal and Semi Royal Aids. But in modern chess there are no ...


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