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8

Well, first, when you are lower-rated, there really is no opening that can be considered drawish since it takes a fair amount of skill to be able to draw at will. That is often a skill associated more with the Grandmaster ranks, and maybe some solid IMs too. Assuming that someone has the skill to draw, it really comes down to the ability to exchange pieces ...


8

That is the Slav, but the problem for black in many of these lines, and specifically immediately, is that if 3...Bf5, then 4.cd cd 5.Qb3 forces you to sacrifice d5 or b7 since 5...b6 just loses. [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Bf5 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3! b6? 6.e4! (6.Nc3) Bxe4 (6...dxe4 7.Ne5+-) 7.Ne5 a6 8.Ba6! Ra6 9.Qb5 Nd7 10.Nd7! Qd7 (10......


6

While d6 is passive, it is probably not the end of the world there at levels below Master. After Nc3, it is not so much that it "rules out Philidor's Defense" as when white played 2.Nc3, it became a Vienna opening proper. More typically, when white plays the Vienna, he is looking to attack, and often plays an early f4. With f4 played, you can see how you ...


6

It is, indeed, called a "pawn chain". It does not have any other special designation. There is no single best way to counter any specific pawn chain, as it is much more complex than that. Here is a bit on that. Pawn chains, and where you attack them, is the basis for all opening play. Where the pawns on both sides clash is called a pawn break. Knowing where ...


5

I tried this about 15 years ago and after 4. cd cd 5. Qb3 I was soon in a world of pain. I've never tried it since. [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Bf5 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Qb3 There is no good way to defend the b pawn and white's minor pieces flow effortlessly into the attack. Nc3, Bf4, maybe Ne5 at some stage, either e3 or even e4, followed by Bb5. Nb5 ...


4

For starters, 13.Kb1 is considered the main line and scores at 73% to only 51% for 13.h5. In general, I do not think it is very good to ever allow the Rc3 exchange sac there. In the main line, 13.Kb1 Nc3 14.Bc4 Rc4 15.g4 Rfc8, Karpov already would play 16.Nde2 there (or a very similar position), and he won some great games. 19.gf was already a big mistake ...


4

The London Defensive System is actually a named line in the Réti Opening. And yes, it is very playable. You don't see this very often nowadays, because White will try to stop Black from playing it. Here is a famous game Réti - Lasker, 1924, in which Lasker went for this line and won convincingly. Look at the position after 9.Nbd2. From my analysis: ...


4

The exchange variation of the French defense has symmetrical pawn structures with an open file. Symmetrical pawn structures make it difficult to create imbalances which lead decisive games. Then the rooks and/or queen will get exchanged along the open file. Fewer pieces coupled with a balanced position is drawish.


4

I think there are a few things here. When playing a gambit line that maybe you do not know, the first thing I would recommend is not necessarily taking it. Either 3.Ne5 or even 3.d4 look safer. On move four, you had the choice of taking two pawns, one that developed his N, and the other, which took a center pawn. The center P was easily the right way to go ...


3

At lower levels, it's certainly not drawish as there is a chance to use the outpost in the open file (as well as some manoeuvering towards the f5 (f4 for Black) square, which is great for knights), and games with opposite-side castles are possible. A c4 (or ...c5) break is also possible turning the position into an isolated central pawn one, which isn't more ...


3

I will try to give a few ideas based on the limited information, and trying to follow some common sense regarding development and the moves your opponent played. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e6 2. d3 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 (4. Be2 g6 {4...d5!} 5. O-O Bg7 6. c3 Nge7 7. Be3 d6 8. d4) 4... g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O Nge7 7. c3 d6 8. Re1 e5 9. a3 O-O 10. b4 a6 11. Be3 b6 12. ...


3

This is going to be kind of general, because there's a lot of territory to explore, and space limitations reduce me to doing not much more than pointing at some of the landmarks. There might be something for you in either the Cambridge Springs or the Vienna Variation of the QGD. I know, the Queen's Gambit Declined is thought to be so barren, but both of ...


2

With white play 1. e4 If black plays 1...e5 play 2. Bc4. From here you've cut out a lot of theory (ie petrovs, philidors, latvian etc) If you want something simple just play a basic formation with f4, d3 etc. Otherwise you can transpose to a wide variety of openings like the Italian (incl evans), King's gambit, Vienna, Scotch gambit etc. There is a lot of ...


2

While it's a gambit by Black, what about Tal's gambit? Black is scoring 55% in 228 grandmaster and elite correspondence games after 1 e4 c5; 2 f4 d5; 3 exd5 Nf6. I'd call Black doing better than 50% in that many top games an advantage. (And 55% is better than Black's score in any of the main non-gambit responses to 2 f4.)


2

The English opening is pretty bad as a choice for beginners. For one, the things beginners need to learn (center, development, king safety) are less important in a positional opening like this and it will lead to lagging weaknesses that you don't understand. For another the English is extremely complex both because of transpositions and positional ...


2

What is it called when your opponent opens with their pawns in a zigzag formation, leaving the front line defended by the back? (Pawn Chain) Erm ... I think you've answered your own question. what is the best way to counter this move? Every pawn chain has a base and a head. The standard way of attacking them is to attack one or the other or both ...


1

Playing ...Bf5 against the Queen's Gambit is quite possible, and is known as the Baltic defense. GM Igors Rausis has had decent results with it decades before getting involved in a cheating scandal. In its ideal form, you play 2...Bf5 before committing your c-pawn, keeping ...Nc6 as an option, and possibly defending Pd5 with ...e6 Of course, if White has ...


1

There's a lot of ways to describe the position (such as closed) but no specific name. How to play in the position- 1) First of all you want to make favorable minor piece exchanges. Generally knights are going to be better in these types of structures especially if they can find advanced outposts. White's g2 bishop is an example of a "bad" bishop and is ...


1

After 13...c5 white had a pretty big advantage. After that there are wide swings between both sides for the rest of the game with the advantage changing 6 times. That means the opening had zero effect on the outcome of the game. That being said, 8. Ne5 was a pretty weak move. After 8...Qd4 how are you going to both protect the knight and prevent black ...


1

The line given by Allure is the standard refutation of the Danish however the line given by Hamish might be even better. That line was played by Capablanca and I don't realistically see white having any winning chances.


1

It depends on the position but in the second position you gave sf has white with a clear advantage. In the first position sf has it -.9 but black is up a pawn which means the eval is based on black's material advantage. Positionally, white is a little better. I'm not sure where you're getting that white is worse positionally.


1

Sometimes there's some practical value in taking a line others feel is unplayable and making it somewhat playable. At best, you should be aiming for a line that gives the opponent lots of chances to go wrong but allows you drawing chances if the opponent plays perfectly. I could give ideas but your opponent could be reading this too. It's best to come up ...


1

First off, the exchange is fine. There's quite a bit online claiming there's a refutation of the entire defense in that line. Regardless a well-timed d5 push can create a lot of problems for black. Secondly, I used to play the Alekhine's and the line I hated to see was the 4 pawns. White can really force black to show he knows what he's doing in that line. ...


1

I'm not sure if I (or anyone that has answered) understands your question correctly. But I would assume you want to know how to avoid middle-game positions early in a game. To answer the question: Playing aggressively and creating threats while developing your own pieces leaves your opponent behind in development and still struggling to complete the ...


1

Maybe black hopes the practical advantages give him a better chance. Or maybe black just likes the position. I, myself, would much rather be down a pawn and dictating the position than up a pawn and defending.


1

Yes, to an extent. It's best to learn openings chronologically. If you're just starting out you should look at the era before Morphy. As you get better you can look at more modern openings. Doing it that way way you can see how the ideas build on the previous generation's ideas. Tal is probably most appropriate for the 1800-2200 range.


1

If you are an inexperienced player (<1900) you should castle quickly. Yes, you may get crushed occasionally by a stronger player but you probably will lose those games anyway. Players above 2000 can get away with leaving their kings in the center (usually)because they understand the types of positions they can get away with it in and can see the attacks ...


1

Steer the game into positions you like. The exchange French is not drawish below master level. White can unbalance the position with c4. Plus, French players hate seeing the exchange as much as you hate seeing the French so there's a psychological advantage too. The Alapin Sicilian leads to similar pawn structures but is extremely sound and very active ...


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