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8

There are many reasons why percentages are misleading. They can mean that the move is more often played when white is stronger than black, or in situations where a draw isn't what white wants, or there is a trap that many people fall into but that can be avoided, or lots of different reasons. Maybe it used to be considered good in the past until some novelty ...


4

I suggest c5. As commented by @NoseKnowsAll it is called the Old Benoni Defense. If white is a pro they will probably have an edge because of their experience but generally, for your criteria (it is not symmetrical) it has the highest statistics for black winning in some of the databases such as https://www.365chess.com/opening.php?m=2&n=7&ms=d4&...


4

is it better to play the less common because your opponent is less likely to be familiar with it? Alternatively, should you not play it because it's less popular for a reason Neither. You would do best to understand that the only popularity contest that is important in your games is which positions you find easier / more fun to play. Play the moves that ...


4

Well, if people don’t see those moves often people don’t know how to react to them. Also keep in mind that the win percentage can sway easily due to the small amount of people playing that move.


4

The path to mastering the openings isn't memorising moves and variations, it's understanding why certain moves are played in specific positions, why certain moves are favoured over others. Memorisation is a shortcut to understanding, not a replacement. There are sharp offshoots of most opening systems that mean you have to be aware of certain traps and ...


3

It's hard to say without analyzing your games but I imagine there are two parts of your problem. General lack of opening principals Investing time in learning concepts like "what is the goal of the opening" can be just as valuable as practicing tactical puzzles. Openings aren't just about memorizing move sequences but there are plenty of general ...


3

For example, after 1. e4 e5 you could play 2. f4 or 2. Nf3, and the computer will tell you they're both top moves in this position without marking either of them as an inaccuracy or a mistake. That's because there is a line of code in the program which says something like: If (move is in book) then set move value = accurate else call regular evaluation ...


3

You are right that memorizing tons of variations will be neither very helpful nor very entertaining. However, proper "study" of chess openings is much more than just blind memorization! The key is to learn the general principles and common patterns (strategical as well as tactical). This is what will actually enable you to "just play" in ...


3

3. Bc4 is one of those fairly regular moves that defer the opening selection of the Scotch Gambit (1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4) and the Danish Gambit (1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Bc4). 3... Bc5? is a well-known mistake because of the Bxf7+ followed by Qh5+ sequence. That's why Black's move is normally 3... Nc6 or 3... Nf6.


3

This is a recognised opening. It's the Colle-Zukertort opening by transposition. The normal move-order for White is d4, e3, Bd3, Nf3, Nbd2 this is the Colle System, then b3, Bb2 to end up with this structure. In the Colle, White breaks open the centre with the freeing move e3-e4 and gains piece play on the kingside which can turn into a king-side attack. ...


3

One hundred years ago grandmasters, even the great Capablanca, were given to making sweeping judgments about opening positions without supporting evidence, often condemning moves that have been shown to be quite playable. In fact 5...Bxc3 is now considered a "book" move, though 5...O-O is probably slightly better. And as to 5.d3 making the exchange ...


3

I suspect you are looking for OpeningTree


2

This is called the English Opening. The objective of the opening is to apply pressure on the center d5 square without committing the queen pawn or the king pawn. The standard response is 1..., e5 (Reversed Sicilian), but there are many other options, 1..., c5 for example (Symmetrical) or 1..., e6, a more manuevering type of game. This opening is known for ...


2

At 1400 on chess.com, openings aren't your main issue. Five moves of theory should be fine. Your opponent will throw in a Rb8 when you're attacking his king anyways so you won't be in theory for long. At your level, chess is 99% tactics. However, the concepts behind said 5 moves are still important to know and understand. Like in the Caro-Kann, Nd7 stops ...


1

Generally though, the more pieces are on the board, the harder it is for engines to find a big advantage because there are many possible moves which make it harder for the engine to predict the outcome and alter the positional score greatly. The answer really is that in some middlegames (closed positions) will often allow you to make many moves since not too ...


1

There doesn't appear to be a way to do this directly. There's a predetermined list of columns available, and this isn't one of the choices. And, while the ECO Code field will allow you to type in a different ECO code than the one it auto-detects, it won't save anything other than a valid ECO code, so you can't just type in something like "Sicilian" ...


1

I find the answer quite obvious: Maybe White has only a 55% advantage in average GM play, but if you are a beginner, it's far much easier to botch up your position with Black. (I'm speaking with personal experience - I managed to lose in 10 moves, and even being a FM, with Black I must fight for my life each time.) My personal suggestion would not be trying ...


1

I think there is no simple answer to this question and you will develop understanding day by day. In chess basically, the bishop is more valuable than the knight in an open position. When the black exchange the bishop with the knight, it would be a bad exchange. Furthermore, you can not take the e4 pawn. Example variant is 5 .. Bxc3 6.dxc3 Nxe4 7. Re1 d5 8. ...


1

I guess the main thing "wrong" with the opening is that it doesn't press for an advantage. Stockfish at a depth of 22 gives the position above a -0.03, which is essentially equal. That's not surprising, since the position is almost symmetrical, except White has played a3 instead of castling. The bishop on b2 has a very limited scope, and White does ...


1

After 4.cxd5 the Queen cannot take because of 5.Nc3 Qa5 6.Bd2 which renders black in a horrible game (Stockfish says +1.4). So black has to play 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 which either wins the pawn on b7 or forces black to play Qd7 (or Bc8) [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.e3 Bf5 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3 Qd7 6.Nc3 e6 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.Bd2 However, this is 0.0 or maybe +0.1. ...


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