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17

There's a variety of reasons why openings are commonly named after nations (but most commonly would surprise me), maybe due to an individual player of the nation, e.g. Spanish (Ruy Lopez), English (Staunton), maybe due to a group of players in one nation e.g. Italian, maybe due to an event involving the nation e.g. Scotch (named for a correspondence match ...


16

The joke is based on the perception of Giri as a very solid, "drawish" player. There always seems to be one top player who is the butt of such jokes. It used to be Leko, nowadays it's Giri. Take a look at this reddit thread for example or this chess24 April's fool. The swashbuckling Evan's is the last opening Giri would ever choose to play, or so the ...


16

I'm discounting the explanation he just made an error in his annotations because of the deliberate way he looks at the camera when he announces this First of all, he did make a mistake. He said Giri played the Evans Gambit but Giri was black. The Evans Gambit is an opening played by white. The opening is sound and is occasionally played at the top ...


12

There is a prerequisite to any aspect of playing chess: NEVER EVER IGNORE YOUR OPPONENT AND THEIR INTENTIONS, FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER! This is of course not very surprising, but nobody has ever become even a halfway decent player by not paying any attention to their opponent (as you noted yourself, you dropped two pieces by not paying proper attention to ...


11

The Evans Gambit is a running gag on Agadmator's channel. I can't remember when it started but at least for the past year whenever there is a game that reaches the Giuoco Piano position he jokes about white going for the Evans Gambit, a very exciting opening which—to Antonio's dismay it would seem—is played extremely rarely in modern high level chess.


9

In the final position, the black pieces are pointed toward the king side, so logic says that you should attack there. The two obstacles are the bishop pinning the f-pawn and the control provided by the doubled e-pawns. Stockfish pushes the a-pawn to chase away the bishop and uses the queen to apply pressure on e3. Pressuring and exploiting white's dark-...


7

About the second line, 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d6: This line is known as the King's Gambit, Fischer defense. One thing it isn't is "ignoring your gambit" - Black is stopping you from playing Ne5 after the well-known Black maneuver ...g5-g4 in the King's gambit main lines. The most common line now is 4. d4, when 4...g5 5. h4 g4 forces White to play 6. Ng1 (...


7

Ivanchuk has played several games in the Scandinavian variation of the Alekhine. You can find the games for example here, if you sort by black Elo.


7

Yes, in the Sicilian black often falls behind in development, and that is a problem -- white often gets the chance to mount an attack. But black has some compensation. After ...cxd4 Nxd4 he has two central pawns while white only has the e-pawn. In order to attack quickly, white often castles queenside and black can use the half-open c-file to start a ...


7

Thus, why is the London System considered safe? Every opening where white starts with 1. d4 is considered safe compared to 1. e4 (provided white doesn't do anything silly) because the queen protects d4. d4 openings are inherently safer than e4 openings. Why do proponents say you can utilize it regardless of what your opponent does? No intelligent, ...


5

Openings are typically decided by ECO Codes. So as few as one move and as many as 5-6 or more moves could decide an opening. For example, as soon as you play 1. b3 it is a Nimzo-Larsen attack. (A01) As soon as 1. e4 c5 is played it is a Sicilian defence. (B20) But there are many variations. If the game continues 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6, it becomes ...


4

I have every reason to believe your approach is wrong and will lead to disaster. I'm saying it as someone who make softwares to work on Polyglot books (www.smallchess.com). You are strongly advised NOT to do all the hard works like what I did before. Just wrap the C++ Polyglot code in your C#! Your time should be on your C# engine, not this. Polyglot, ...


4

IMO, 3...c5 by itself, is not really a problem, after the strongest continuation 4.d4 stockfish gives 0.5, and after 4th move in the game stockfish gives equality. And I think your reasoning is fine, it is generally good to trade a c-pawn for d-pawn. But it looks like it is a part of bigger problem: You made too many pawn moves 5...h6 And 6...f5, and later ...


4

After f6 White takes with the bishop and Black loses a piece (bishop on c5 since d6 square is attacked by the white knight and f8 is attacked by the white pawn; no other piece is protecting the bishop).


4

There's a "drawing line" in the Petrov Defense for White: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 {Black has to play this or 6. d3 wins a piece} 6. d3 Nf6 7. Qxe7+ Playing 7. Qxe7+ loses White's opening half-tempo, but queens are off, and if that's what White wants he's gotten it. Not playing Qxe7+ can still lead to a queen trade, ...


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