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50

In general, a chess set has the king as the tallest piece, followed by queen, bishop, knight, rook and pawn in that order. Notice in the starting position how the piece height decreases smoothly from the centre to the edge. (Also, when buying a chess set, usually the height of the king is given as a guide to the size of the chessmen.) Thus I would say the ...


32

Castling is extremely useful in almost all games. It lets you do two things at once. First, it moves your king from the center to the side of the board, where it is much more difficult to attack for the opponent. Second, it brings one of your rooks towards the center of the board, and it crucial in bringing both of your rook into the game. There may be a ...


28

I know you're a FIDE Master :), so I suppose you're more interested in this question from a teaching perspective. The simplest way to understand a checkmate with King and Rook vs King is the idea of the rectangle of the opposing king. Consider this position- Here, the Black King is restricted by the White Rook in this giant rectangular area of the ...


25

Wikipedia claims that In early Sanskrit chess (c. 500–700) the king could be captured and this ended the game. The Persians (c. 700–800) introduced the idea of warning that the king was under attack (announcing check in modern terminology). This was done to avoid the early and accidental end of a game. Later the Persians added the additional rule that a ...


24

One nice example of this is in this game, where a player named Feuer takes advantage of the ability to castle queenside while b1 is attacked to play a beautiful combination. [FEN ""] [Event "Belgian Championship"] [Site "Liege BEL"] [Date "1934"] [EventDate "?"] [Round "?"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Otto Feuer"] [Black "Alberic O'Kelly de Galway"] [ECO "C73"] [...


23

There are three ways to get out of check. Simply move the king away. Block the check, or place a piece in between the king and the opponent's attacking piece. Capture the piece that's checking the king. All of these cases are dependent on the fact that immediately after you make your move, the king is not in check. Therefore, you may capture the queen ...


21

There are several key positions from which it is easy to memorize the win. The basic idea is to drive the opposing king to the edge of the board, and then to the corner, where you can force the rook to separate from the king. [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "????.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "King and Queen"] [Black "King and Rook"] [Result "*"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN ...


21

At first glance, the taller piece with skinnier top would appear to be the King while the shorter, rounder piece would appear to be the Queen. There are a few reasons why this would appear to be the case. The King often has a cross on top and the taller piece with the spike appears to more closely resemble that than the shorter piece, and in some sets the ...


20

INTRODUCTORY NOTE: Examples and instructions are taken from the book: Y.Averbakh - Comprehensive Chess Endings Volume 3. In many cases I felt no need to "reinvent the wheel" so I quoted the above authors. Those parts will be marked with apostrophes "", like this: "This is a quoted text". Without further delay let us tackle this endgame: "In endings of ...


20

Your friend is right. Think of it in terms of capturing the king: check means that your king could be captured on your opponent's next move. If you could move your king next to your opponent's king, your king could be captured on your opponent's next move; the fact that after that you could capture your opponent's king doesn't change that: your king has been ...


19

Practically speaking, if the king were any more powerful, checkmate or capture would be impossible. The Queen originated as the Advisor. The Advisor was powerful, but not as powerful as the modern Queen, however. Why did the Advisor become the Queen? Having more than one Queen per side would debase the game, and there are two each of the other pieces. ...


17

Putting your king in check is not a legal move as you've realized. Of course, if Black has any OTHER legal moves he can and should play one of them! If a side TO MOVE does not have ANY legal moves, that would be a stalemate, not a checkmate (which is delivered only by the side making the check)


17

If these are two real kings, it is not possible. This is because one requirement of checkmate is that the black king is in check which cannot be achieved with any of the white kings, since it would put the white king in check. If you say that white has only one king and a nonstandard chess piece that moves exactly like a king (i.e. this piece can be put ...


16

A King and a Man (or commoner; i.e., a non-royal King) can mate a lone King. The longest distance to mate on a standard 8x8 board is 18 moves. The result quoted above was obtained by H.G. Muller in 2008, see this coment on chessvariants.com: http://www.chessvariants.com/index/listcomments.php?id=28770


15

Your opponent has 50 moves, but every time a pawn is moved the count is reset. So, he could have hundreds of moves if he has a few pawns on the board. If he has no pawns, then 50. The count is also reset if any piece or pawn is captured.


15

There are a few technical ways to approach this endgame, the most notable one being a Philidor's Position (the KQ vs. KR one, not the KRP vs. KR one or the KRB vs. KR one). If you do a web search for 3rd or 4th rank defense, you should be able to find more complicated situations outlining ideas for how the defensive position can try to put up a fight while ...


14

In "Chess Fundamentals," former world champion J. R. Capablanca noted that this was the hardest of the basic piece-only endgames to win. His analysis was that the stronger side can win if it can force the rook away from the king, with double threats of checkmating the king, and forking rook and king. If the defending side can keep the rook near the king ...


13

Samuel Loyd found faster in 1895. [FEN ""] 1. c4 d5 2. cxd5 Qxd5 3. Qc2 Qxg2 4. Qxc7 Qxg1 5. Qxb7 Qxh2 6. Qxb8 Qe5 7. Qxc8+ Rxc8 8. Rxh7 Qxb2 9. Rxh8 Qxa2 10. Rxg8 Qxd2+ 11. Kxd2 Rxc1 12. Rxg7 Rxb1 13. Rxf7 Rxf1 14. Rxf8+ Kxf8 15. Rxa7 Rxf2 16. Rxe7 Rxe2+ 17. Kxe2 Kxe7 https://pdb.dieschwalbe.de/search.jsp?expression=PROBID=%27P0001931%27 This is 17.0 ...


12

The king can capture the enemy queen, as long that does not place it in check from another piece.


12

I would love to see the position; please add it to your question somehow (we can always edit it to look nice). However, there is no such rule. Either your computer doesn't implement captures en passant (improbable these days) or the capture was not valid for some other reason.


12

Your friend and the existing answer here are both right: You can't do that. There's no explicit law of chess for just this situation because it's fully covered by a slightly more general article from the FIDE Laws of Chess: 3.9.1 The king is said to be 'in check' if it is attacked by one or more of the opponent's pieces, even if such pieces are ...


12

This is covered in FIDE's Laws of Chess 5.2b) The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead position’. This immediately ends the game, provided that the move producing the position was in accordance with Article 3 and Articles 4.2 – ...


12

Your "checkless" chess AI would run into problems with the stalemate rule. It would consider the poaition with white king on a6, white pawn a7, black king a8, a win for White because wherever Black moves his king it will get captured. In standard chess, of course, the position is a draw.


12

The FIDE rules say this about castling: This is a move of the king and either rook of the same colour along the player’s first rank, counting as a single move of the king


12

It doesn't matter. As long as you and your opponent are in agreement about which one is the king and which one is the queen, it doesn't really matter what they were "supposed" to be. That said, if they're easy to mistake, then you run the risk of someone making a misplay because they got confused about which one is which. Which would be unfortunate. ...


11

Maybe your pawn happened to be pinned? 8/8/7r/5K1k/7p/8/6P1/7R w - - 0 1 1. g4+# hxg3?? 2. Rxh5


11

The general rule of thumb is that: if the queens are off the board then it's generally safe to keep the kings central in order to use them as active pieces (specially in endgames) instead of tucking them away into a safe corner. But that's just a general rule, and like any other rule in chess it is to be taken with caution, because at the end of the day ...


10

I know you mainly asked about the 50 move rule, and that has already been answered, but I thought I'd answer the exact question as stated which was "With the King as the last piece, how can you get a draw?" Both players can agree to a draw Opponent Stalemates you (you have no legal moves, but are not in check) You stalemate your opponent (yes you can do ...


10

As long as we're mentioning ways the player with the rook can draw, the following is a very common setup in endgame puzzle books: [fen "8/8/8/8/8/2QK4/8/3kr3 b - - 0 1"] Black to move and draw Solution:


10

Since you can't move your king into check, you can't legally check the other king. The Laws of Chess, section 5.2b, states that: The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead position’. This immediately ends the game, provided that ...


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