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40

There is no need for an early queen trade. Just develop your pieces, if possible by attacking the queen. Here is an example from the Wayward Queen Attack also known as Patzer Opening. [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Ne2 Bg7 6. Nbc3 O-O 7. d3 d6 2.Qh5 threatens to take e5, so we defend it by developing a piece: Nc6 (d6 is also possible)...


32

Trying to encourage a queen trade in this sort of situation is usually the wrong strategy. The exaggerated version of the answer is this. Your opponent has just proved that they don't know how to use their queen properly. Instead of saying, "That's OK. I'll trade off the queens so this isn't a problem for you", you should say "I'll keep exploiting this ...


31

Castling is extremely useful in almost all games. It lets you do two things at once. First, it moves your king from the center to the side of the board, where it is much more difficult to attack for the opponent. Second, it brings one of your rooks towards the center of the board, and it crucial in bringing both of your rook into the game. There may be a ...


13

The way I see it, neither of you was aggressive in the opening -- you both tried to get rid of your pieces as quickly as possible! Being aggressive is getting many pieces in active positions quickly, not giving them away. When we give advice, we have to take into account the level of the players. Both of you need to work on the most basic skill first: Piece ...


13

Can you try answering why are you trying to prevent your opponent from castling? When you think about this more - you realize that castling prevention is just a tactical weapon, nothing more. Of course you can win a game if you are good at tactics, if your opponent makes mistakes, but, to quote Alekhine: "It took me many years to get rid of the bias ...


10

2... Qf6, while not strictly unsound, is definitely an inferior move, not only because it develops the queen prematurely, but also (and more importantly) because it deprives the black king's knight of a very natural square on f6. Don't panic about a possible king-side attack -- black cannot mate with no minor pieces developed. There are a number of ...


7

French defense is often thought of as solid positional defense. However, French defense can be used as tactical weapon and many GMs use it that way. See two games by Alexander Morozevich below. Therefore, you should be able to play attacking chess using the French. If the French is working out for you, play it! Polgar-Morozevich: [FEN ""] [Event "Wijk aan ...


7

Capturing an extra pawn represents a clear advantage. If I had the opportunity to do this, I'd do it before almost anything else. Preventing someone from castling is an advantage, but only all other things being equal. If you can do this in the natural course of play, fine. But if you go out of your way to do this, you may incur a disadvantage greater than ...


7

"In short, I'm usually good at tactics" - most of what you wrote up to that point kinda does contradict that: Your attacks are easily rebuffed, you cannot easily find attacking moves, and you fail to correctly predict your opponent's answers. You have to understand that strategy and tactics go hand in hand. Good strategy uses tactical threats to force your ...


7

Training chess tactics should be done by theme. This means solve a set of tactics that are based on a similar theme, like Double Attack, Discovered Check, Absolute Pin, Relative Pin, Skewers, etc. This impresses upon the mind the ideas of that particular kind of tactic and gets your brain looking for it as a matter of course. After, you will find yourself '...


7

When asking questions about tactics and sacrifices, chess engines are usually the most efficient and accurate way of determining the answer. The following is based on analysis from Houdini 6.03 in tactical mode: By the end of move 24, in the following position, a forced mate (in 8) already exists for white [FEN "2rq3r/1R6/p3kp1Q/4p3/2p1P1PP/P1N5/2P5/4KR2 w ...


6

Many engines have adjustable parameters, which allow to alter their playing style. If you mess around it a bit, you can create whole 'engine personalities'... Here, for example, someone though it interesting to create a personality called, the Komodo Kinghunter. Apparently, it does exactly what you are looking for - plays aggressively and not necessarily ...


6

To me, the game you described was an absolute beginner game. It wasn't important how the attack was conducted, all-out or slow, you opponent was just blundering pieces and even the queen! It didn't matter whether you were defending or attacking or doing nothing, you'd have won easily in any case. Your opponent had absolutely no idea what he was talking about....


6

I assume that by "attacking play" you mean a direct attack (mating attack) against the enemy king. This question is too general to be answered unless all you want is a recommendation for study resources. whenever I play, I am usually on the defensive Need to see a specific game, but typically this happens if you neglect development, play too slowly or ...


6

Well this is the sort of thing that changes from one person to another: there's no unique/best way of going about it. Almost everything you say are in general good recommendations. At least from my personal experience, most important is to find a routine for solving puzzles on a regular basis. Each puzzle contains at least a key idea that you can take away, ...


5

Castling is a way of strengthening your King for its' defensive position and Rook's position for its' attacking position(Coming to the game) Types of Castling King Side denoted by O-O since the King is moving two squares towards the King-side Rook. Queen Side denoted by O-O-O since the King is moving two squares towards the Queen-side Rook. When not to ...


5

Nf5 would win the queen one way or another because of the threat Qg4+, Qg7++. For instance 16. Nf5 Qe6 17. Qg4+ Qg6 18. Ne7+ Other than that, when you are attacking and the opponent's pieces are undeveloped or discoordinated you really want to open files and not create a closed position. Therefore 17. exd6 e.p. or even better 18. exf6 e.p. seems natural. ...


5

The gambit is perfect for amateurs, the gambit is tricky and could be deadly if Black underestimate White's attacking potential. I've personally used it to beat players around FIDE 2000, so it's fine for you to try.


5

I've been playing the Smith Morra Gambit for about 5 years and am rated around 2000 FIDE currently. I regularly play the Morra(it is my only response against the Sicilian), and my performance with it is usually 100 or more points above my rating. Thus, the Morra definitely can be played against stronger opposition. However, if you are serious about ...


5

In his award winning book, Pump up you Rating, Axel Smith advocates something he calls the "Woodpecker Method". This is named after Hans Tikkanen (Tikkanen is Finnish for woodpecker) who first used the method to obtain 3 GM norms in 7 weeks. There are a number of important principles in the method. First you solve large numbers (larger numbers (1000s) for ...


5

First, I think you are looking for a hard-and-fast rule that does not exist since it really depends on the position. There still can be some guiding factors. In the Karpov game above, which only lasted another 6 moves, it turns out that literally every white piece was an attacker, and was necessary for the attack to succeed, so the original question about ...


5

It doesn't really mean anything to attack (or exchange) a piece if you don't get anything from it. Also, it can end up getting you in a worse position if you don't pay close attention. If he brings his queen out, unless there is a threat, keep bringing your pieces out and develop your game. And if you can attack his queen while developing a piece to force ...


4

I castle in most games, but I'll be a contrarian and mention when/why I don't like to castle... When/why not to castle: to use the tempo for something else I think a lot of people castle too early, often using it as a "well I don't know what to do next" move. Think about what you'll want to do after you castle, and see if there might be a tactic that might ...


4

Well, certainly not highly tactical or aggressive. Both games strike me as rather slow and systematic. You can call that solid, if you like, though the openings seemed to be a bit shaky. It seemed to me that you saw the tactical details a lot better than your opponents, which made the games rather onesided. But that is not so much a stylistic difference, ...


4

If you increase Rybka 3 Dynamic's contempt setting, it sacrifices more and more material in attractive style. The Fritz GUI (sold with Rybka, Komodo, Houdini, Junior, Shredder et al) includes a King's Attack slider in its Handicap and Fun dialog. The Fritz 10 engine in particular avoided closed positions like the plague, and often played for mate. It had ...


4

It really depends on what level of chess you're looking at. At the amateur level (<2200), I would hypothesize that white's supposed "first-move advantage" is relatively insignificant. However, it's quite evident at the higher levels that white has an advantage when playing mainstream openings - please reference the Shredder Opening Database for the ...


4

6.Qh5 is not so great because Black has 6...Nbc6, both attacking d4 and threatening ...Nb4 trading off White's important light-squared bishop (it can't move to e2 or something because of ...Nxc2+). White seems to be better off preemptively defending the d-pawn with a move like 6.Nf3 or 6.Nge2.


4

Former World Champion Jose R Capablanca felt that 3... Qxd5 was superior to 3... exd5. It once led to a sharp, complicated game which he lost (as White). If White plays 4. Nc3, then 4... Bb5. If White tries to chase the B with 5. a3, then 5... Qa5 pins the a pawn. Note that with the Q off the diagonal, White cannot pin a N on f6 with Bg5 (nor can he play it ...


4

Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do. You will have to adapt to White's play and that is it. Only White can sharpen the game, by entering the line with isolated pawn ( by playing c4 at some point ). The line you chose gives White minimal advantage, according to ECO C ( 2006 ), so I would stay away from it. The position is symmetrical, White is ...


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