Hot answers tagged

35

It doesn't stand for anything at all, because it's not an acronym. It should be "Elo" rather than "ELO." The Elo rating system is named after the Hungarian-American physics professor (and 8-time state champion chess master) Arpad Elo, who originally devised his rating system around 1960.


33

No. The vast majority of club level players still play like the vast majority of club level players always did. Changes in knowledge about chess mostly apply to high levels of play; the kind of mistakes class A players make were already known to be mistakes for ages, and opening theory doesn't help much if your opponent deviates from theory at move 5 anyway. ...


32

The website 2700chess.com has a database with the FIDE ratings (from May 1st, 2019). Their search form only offers the option to show the top 50 or 100 players satisfying the search results, but it's possible to modify the submit request and ask for the top 5000 instead. When I do that, I get 808 results: So the other 700 must have ratings lower than 2500 ...


20

No difference whatsoever. As with tournament results, ELO (or Glicko, or any other chess rating system) counts all losses the same, all draws the same, and all wins the same. Doesn't matter if you lose on time, resign, or get mated on the board --- nor whether it took 12 moves or 120. Likewise a draw is a draw, whether by agreement, repetition, stalemate (...


20

Most chess sites use some variant of the Elo rating system If you have a much higher rating than your opponent, the expectation is that you will win. So if you do win, then we haven't gained that much information, so the change in rating for both you and your opponent will be small. If your opponent wins, there will be a much larger change in rating as ...


19

I am surprised that the paper "Intrinsic Chess Ratings" by Ken Regan and Guy Haworth hasn't been posted yet. It is exactly what's asked for, serious research into rating inflation. PDF Basically they got games from three periods (1976-1979, 1991-1994, 2006-2009), in several rating ranges (e.g. both players within 10 points of 2200, within 10 points of 2300, ...


19

ELO is not an absolute measurement; it is only meaningful relevant to the ELOs of other players. This is because it is only calculated based on performance against other rated players. The "Maximum ELO", which seems to be what you're looking for, is therefore equal to the ELO of a player at such a time when his ELO is so high that he cannot gain any ELO ...


18

Fide has a rule saying that if one player is rated more than 400 points higher than his opponent, their difference should be set to 400 when calculating rating gain/loss. That means no matter how weak the opposition is, a GM (or anyone) will receive minimum 0.8 rating points for winning. What is the reason behind this? This is an historical anomaly. ...


17

The rating system already kind of allows you to calculate this since you can convert any rating difference into an expected score using the formula: expected = 1/(1 + 10^(diff/400)) so a rating difference of 382 points should give you the .9 expected score. Therefore Magnus Carlsen at 2872 should score 90% (which could be 9 wins and one loss out of 10 ...


17

Gaining 400 points in a single year is not a reasonable goal for an adult playing at 1600. To do this, you will need to be +25 against your peers, where a peer is someone with the rating you have at the time the game is played. That being said, if you're going to try it, the first step is to get an instructor. Your instructor will be able to identify the ...


17

There are actually three different distinctions in the USCF system that have to do with a 2200 rating. First is the National Master title. It is awarded to anyone who has ever had an established (not provisional) rating of over 2200. Once a player is a National Master, they have the title for life no matter what happens to their rating. The NM title has no ...


16

The engine alone is just one factor; the number of CPU's used, memory, etc. makes the engine stronger. The same engine on an Intel 286 will not be nearly as strong as on the Cray Titan supercomputer, for example. Also, the number of cores makes a difference too. For example, Houdini 3 can take advantage of 32 cores if available. But from the list below, ...


16

I took the following data from the September 2013 Golden Database1 and "active" players are players with a USCF membership expiration date later than January 1, 20132. All ratings are regular ratings. Note that players have an established rating after completing 25 games. USCF Active Players Established Ratings 46,574 Players 1315.99 Mean Rating 1390 ...


16

The Site ratings at slow time controls can be quite reliable for servers where strong players congregate (ICC, FICS to name a few) as the ratings VERY closely reflect your true playing strength if you've played enough games. For very standardized rating systems such as USCF and FIDE/ELO, you will notice that the different rating classes tend to point to the ...


15

Million Base 2.5 (available from a link here) and ICOfY Base are two free options that more than meet your given criteria, each providing millions of games in PGN format to draw from as you please. In particular, ICOfY Base includes well over 4 million games.


15

I think you best shot is to play 200 rated games of G/60 or longer this year and seriously analyzed each game (like imagine if you analyzed each game for 1 hour plus, tried to find similar high level games, tried to find as many different plans in the position, etc) in addition to doing regular tactical exercises on chess.com trainer or some other good site (...


13

The best thing to train is (almost) always calculation: Get a set of maybe 1000 3-5 move combinations and go through those problems until you basically know them by heart. That's to enable pattern recognition. Apart from that set, concentrate on calculating long variations in your training instead of just seeing tactical shots. The Yusupov books are a good ...


13

This can't be true. I (rated ~1900) expect to score 100% against a 1000 player. I don't think a 1980 rated user is able to score 200% against the same opposition. In table 8.1b in the FIDE rating regulations, you'll find the expected scores corresponding to a rating difference. A rating difference of 80 corresponds to an expected score of 0.61, which is ...


12

I poked around some. You've probably seen these pages, but I'll post them anyway: a. This page will interest you. It includes a photocopy of a letter from Elo himself stating the possibility: Thus over time the rating scale could drift unless some measures are taken to stabilize it. He further mentions that the ratings scale has no anchor, no fixed ...


12

This answer addresses one concrete portion of the OP; namely, for an arbitrary N > 0, what rating difference between Player A and Player B corresponds to Player A's expected score against Player B being N times the expected score for Player B? I'll speak in terms of the USCF's Elo rating system, since I'm most familiar with it. If Player A's expected ...


12

I went through the list of LiChess classical top 200 players and collected the FIDE ratings of LiChess classical ratings of anyone who I could verify on FIDE's website as actually having a FIDE rating: LiChess FIDE LiChess username Name 2585 2265 ClassyPlays Thibault Dudognon [FM] 2389 1869 nikkon2006 Nikita Konstantinov ...


12

I don't think that there is a significant difference at that level. The main difference with chess 20 years ago is the use of computers and they are not extensively used by club players. Also the advances in opening theory have been profited mostly by the top players (a club player normally doesn't know a lot of theory and doesn't memorize a lot of moves ...


12

Given the equation that models the expected score (already posted by Glorfindel), it is mathematically impossible for player A, rated X+80 to score twice as much as player B (rated X) against the same opposition (rated Y). The closest you can get is if Y is very high, in which case the odds of winning are vanishingly small but A has 58% higher chances than B....


11

In 2009, GM Nurlan Ibrayev of Kazakhstan (rated 2407 at the time) lost a classical time control game to 9-year-old Hetul Shah of India, who then had a FIDE rating of 1817. Shah's current rating, now three years after that game, is 1979, not so much higher than it was at the time of his upset victory. So this game wasn't a case of Ibrayev running up against ...


11

Movies like to present "chess hustlers" as playing chess for a living. In reality, most of these people are playing chess for fun. The "hustlers" are often just down on their luck financially and like to make some money while still having fun. There's certainly no J.J. Peachum-type figure who trains chess players to go into parks and make money from ...


11

Coincidentally I already answered exactly this question in response to a similar question. Edit: This similar question was about frequencies of blunders in games, which made the analysis somewhat misleading when directly applied to this question. Originally I looked for blunders from equal positions per game move, which made the results a bit confusing ...


11

Using the official FIDE rating lists, there are 954 players with above 2500 ELO. Currently, FIDE has awarded 1668 players the title of "Grandmaster". Filtering out inactive players, there are 1334 GMs and 729 players with "grandmaster strength". There are GMs with a current ELO as low as 2138. Keep in mind that titles can be awarded for achieving certain ...


10

This game comes to mind: It was a first game in a 2 game match of the first round knock out FIDE championship. Anand rated at 2770 was I believe the highest rated player in the event. Touzane, I believe, was not a professional player. Touzane won the first game. Despite the first game win for Touzane, Anand won the second, and then the tie-break. ...


10

This page has a lot of good info. Kasparov is the highest at 2851. However, such comparisons are fraught with peril as ratings inflate, and they really can't be compared from era to era. I don't think it will be long before Magnus Carlsen takes the 'highest rating' crown. This won't mean he's stronger than Kasparov at his peak. Computer ratings are ...


10

If you have FIDE Elo, you can calculate your percentile as follows: Locate your FIDE Card at http://ratings.fide.com/ Look at your card your position in the word, your continent or your country. Look up the FIDE Card of the player you consider their play deserves your appreciation of percentile 0%. With the positions obtained with both look ups, you can ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible