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41

No. The vast majority of club level players still play like the vast majority of club level players always did. Changes in knowledge about chess mostly apply to high levels of play; the kind of mistakes class A players make were already known to be mistakes for ages, and opening theory doesn't help much if your opponent deviates from theory at move 5 anyway. ...


36

"PhishMaster's Complete Guide To Improvement": What to study, and how. Every player has times where they "plateau", and have trouble moving on, but they usually get past it eventually if they are continuing to study. Sometimes, it is a matter of patience. Here is a set of comprehensive answers to questions I previously gave in various chunks, that are now ...


34

The website 2700chess.com has a database with the FIDE ratings (from May 1st, 2019). Their search form only offers the option to show the top 50 or 100 players satisfying the search results, but it's possible to modify the submit request and ask for the top 5000 instead. When I do that, I get 808 results: So the other 700 must have ratings lower than 2500 ...


27

I went through the list of LiChess classical top 200 players and collected the FIDE ratings of LiChess classical ratings of anyone who I could verify on FIDE's website as actually having a FIDE rating: LiChess FIDE LiChess username Name 2585 2265 ClassyPlays Thibault Dudognon [FM] 2389 1869 nikkon2006 Nikita Konstantinov ...


27

I think they certainly have increased their ELO, but more importantly, their overall chess strength. ELO is only a rating relative to others in the pool so it may tend to go up more slowly if everyone in the pool gets better, which they have collectively. First, you need to take an average of the top players, rather than look at just two incredibly special ...


27

how do I register an official FIDE rating? You don't register a FIDE rating because you have no authority to assign yourself a FIDE rating. Only FIDE can do that. What you need to do is play in one or more FIDE rated tournaments where you: Play at least 5 games against players who already have a FIDE rating Score at least half a point against them Get a ...


23

A 99% win rate is winning 99% of games played. Carlsen does not win nearly that many games, since at top level most games are drawn. Carlsen's overall record in life is +1262 =1289 -454, which means 1262 wins, 1289 draws, 454 losses. He has won 42.00% of all the games he's been recorded to have played, and has an all-time average score of 63.44% (wins are 1 ...


21

No difference whatsoever. As with tournament results, ELO (or Glicko, or any other chess rating system) counts all losses the same, all draws the same, and all wins the same. Doesn't matter if you lose on time, resign, or get mated on the board --- nor whether it took 12 moves or 120. Likewise a draw is a draw, whether by agreement, repetition, stalemate (...


21

How would say a 1700 rated player of say 50 years ago who is no longer .around go against a 1700 player of today? Speaking as a player who was around 50 years ago and was rated the equivalent of 1800 in 1973 (my BCF grading was 150 with a generally accepted conversion formula of ELO = BCF x 8 + 600) and is rated 1718 today I'm pretty sure I would beat my 17 ...


20

ELO is not an absolute measurement; it is only meaningful relevant to the ELOs of other players. This is because it is only calculated based on performance against other rated players. The "Maximum ELO", which seems to be what you're looking for, is therefore equal to the ELO of a player at such a time when his ELO is so high that he cannot gain any ELO ...


20

Most chess sites use some variant of the Elo rating system If you have a much higher rating than your opponent, the expectation is that you will win. So if you do win, then we haven't gained that much information, so the change in rating for both you and your opponent will be small. If your opponent wins, there will be a much larger change in rating as ...


20

Between most players, Elo ratings are zero-sum. The formula for updating an Elo rating looks like this. Suppose player 1 and player 2 are playing a game. First, their ratings are used to generate a prediction: an expected score W that player 1 will get against player 2. Then, we compare this to the actual score, X. player 1 will get K*(X-W) points, where K ...


19

Fide has a rule saying that if one player is rated more than 400 points higher than his opponent, their difference should be set to 400 when calculating rating gain/loss. That means no matter how weak the opposition is, a GM (or anyone) will receive minimum 0.8 rating points for winning. What is the reason behind this? This is an historical anomaly. ...


18

The Site ratings at slow time controls can be quite reliable for servers where strong players congregate (ICC, FICS to name a few) as the ratings VERY closely reflect your true playing strength if you've played enough games. For very standardized rating systems such as USCF and FIDE/ELO, you will notice that the different rating classes tend to point to the ...


18

There are actually three different distinctions in the USCF system that have to do with a 2200 rating. First is the National Master title. It is awarded to anyone who has ever had an established (not provisional) rating of over 2200. Once a player is a National Master, they have the title for life no matter what happens to their rating. The NM title has no ...


18

Arpad Elo was rated 2065 in the August 5 1960 Chess Life ratings list. I believe this list was the first he appeared in that used his Elo system rather than the previous Harkness system. Elo turned 57 years old that month, and he was likely stronger than that when he was younger. In the November 20 1950 ratings list, which used the Harkness system, Elo was ...


16

Everybody seems to agree that "ELO inflation" is real (I found an article from 20 years ago claiming this exists)...except scientists. Here is a 2011 paper that vehemently denies the phenomenon; the abstract says that only little inflation happens, and the players really get better. https://ojs.aaai.org/index.php/AAAI/article/view/7951


16

The raw data which could be used to extract this information is available on the FIDE website (from 2001) and the Olimpbase website (before 2001). What you will need to do is clean the data (the older the data the more "dirty" it is), construct a relational database and insert the data. Then you will be able to use SQL to search the database for ...


15

I looked at the data briefly and got some interesting conclusions. I used data from FIDE webpage for january in years 2006-2019. I calculated each player's rating change in consecutive years and used player's age in the first of the two as the age when this rating change occurred. Then I simply calculated the average. The result is this: As you can see, ...


15

The question is apparently based on a misunderstanding of how ELO ratings work. There is absolutely no mechanism by which the overall increase in players' strength would lead to increase in their ELO. The actual value of the ELO rating bears no meaning; nor does the comparison of ELO at distant times. The only thing that has direct relevance is the ...


15

The Elo rating system is a rating system for two-person, zero-sum games based on the assumption that performance is normally distributed. That is, a player's performance is expected to follow a normal distribution. For FIDE the mean = the player's rating and standard deviation = 2000/7 = 285.7. It was developed by Arpad Elo and first implemented by the ...


15

A typical way to do it is to treat puzzles the same as players and rate them based on whether they "win/lose" and the rating of the "opponent" ChessTempo has a nice explanation here copied below: The rating system is inspired by an idea implemented at the Chess Tactics Server. CTS treats both problem solvers and the problems as opponents with their ...


15

The WCC was the "World Chess Council". It was formed in 1998 by Kasparov after the collapse of the PCA (Professional Chess Association) in 1995. It was Kasparov's fourth attempt at an organization separate from FIDE. It organized the candidates match between Kramnik and Shirov in 1998, which Shirov surprisingly won (5.5-3.5), and he was slated to play ...


15

There still aren't as many OTB tournaments as there were in 2019, but they're starting to come back. You can find USCF rated tournaments at this link. Just make sure to set the "Online" option to "No" if you only want OTB tournaments, and then you can search by date range and either state or proximity. Bear in mind that that for these ...


15

assuming this implies conservatively a win rate of 99% There are a number of wrong assumptions in your question. First, at elite levels where players don't often lose it is draw rates that are high. Second, according to the FIDE rating rules if the rating difference were 670 it would be adjusted down to 400: 8.54 A difference in rating of more than 400 ...


14

The best thing to train is (almost) always calculation: Get a set of maybe 1000 3-5 move combinations and go through those problems until you basically know them by heart. That's to enable pattern recognition. Apart from that set, concentrate on calculating long variations in your training instead of just seeing tactical shots. The Yusupov books are a good ...


14

According to this article on the Chessbase site: Using his own rating system to estimate his playing strength, he calculated his best five-year average rating at 2230 – enough to have earned for him the national master title. In this context, "national master" refers to the USCF National Master title.


13

I don't think that there is a significant difference at that level. The main difference with chess 20 years ago is the use of computers and they are not extensively used by club players. Also the advances in opening theory have been profited mostly by the top players (a club player normally doesn't know a lot of theory and doesn't memorize a lot of moves ...


13

Coincidentally I already answered exactly this question in response to a similar question. Edit: This similar question was about frequencies of blunders in games, which made the analysis somewhat misleading when directly applied to this question. Originally I looked for blunders from equal positions per game move, which made the results a bit confusing ...


13

This can't be true. I (rated ~1900) expect to score 100% against a 1000 player. I don't think a 1980 rated user is able to score 200% against the same opposition. In table 8.1b in the FIDE rating regulations, you'll find the expected scores corresponding to a rating difference. A rating difference of 80 corresponds to an expected score of 0.61, which is ...


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