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75

That only works in blitz time controls with no increment. If you accept games with no increment you are basically agreeing that flagging is part of the game and sportsmanlike. If you personally find it unsporting then always play with an increment and decline challenges with no increment.


48

The official FIDE laws of chess do not know about a queen check. Announcing a "queen check“ might even be considered a case of "to distract or annoy the opponent“ (11.5). Even announcing a "king check“ is not recommended. That’s for tournament chess. In informal games, it is not unusual in some groups to announce a check and a "queen ...


44

In blitz, time is a major factor in the game, and it is fine to try and win on time. If you used too much time, and your opponent thinks he can flag you, there is nothing wrong with that. It is part of the game.


37

Time is a resource in blitz chess, as much as or even more so than material. If it isn't unsportsmanlike to capture your opponent's material, how is it unsportsmanlike to capture their time? In blitz chess, there is often a time-endgame. Otherwise pointless checks and random-looking moves are part of this endgame. From my perspective, this is part of what ...


34

Really interesting question. I think the following shows that such a situation is sort of possible, depending on how you define the pin. [StartFlipped "0"] [FEN "7k/4p3/8/2KP3r/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... e5 2. dxe6?! {Illegal move!} Now, 2. dxe6 is illegal. The check would go from being stopped by both pawns, to being stopped by neither.


31

No. Some people think it is polite to say 'gardez' to alert a player that the Q can be taken. But no rule says you have to say check nor gardez and in serious games with good players it is not done. This gardez for Qs is just a very informal rule amongst some low level players that I have not seen in actual use for 60 years but have read about as being more ...


29

In a tournament game, you are not supposed to speak at all other than to offer a draw or adjust a piece. This includes saying check. This tends to seep into casual games among more experienced players (I haven't said check in years). For players that do not compete in tournaments at all, I don't think that there is any obligation to point it out. When ...


24

There are three ways to get out of check. Simply move the king away. Block the check, or place a piece in between the king and the opponent's attacking piece. Capture the piece that's checking the king. All of these cases are dependent on the fact that immediately after you make your move, the king is not in check. Therefore, you may capture the queen ...


24

waste their time If it's clear that they are able to win within the time they have left, this could be considered bad sportsmanship. However, in those situations the number of remaining checks is usually quite low. win the game on time If that's a possibility, I'd say it's perfectly fine to play on if you're losing on the board. At the beginning of the ...


23

Imagine a variation of chess without the rules about check and checkmate, where a player wins simply when he captures his opponent's king. In this variation, Kxd5 loses the game to exd5. Turns out, that's more or less how real chess works. The objective is to capture the opponent's king. If your king is under attack, you must deal with that threat. If there'...


21

Double check is a fine tactic. An example would be a bishop lined up on the same diagonal as the king with a rook or knight in the way blocking the check. The rook or knight moves giving check to the king and also uncovering the check from the bishop. The king must move since there is no way to block two different lines or take two different pieces at the ...


20

You can find some examples in the following game collection: Games where check is answered with checkmate. Among those games, Nigel Short vs Alexander Morozevich, Russia - The Rest of the World (2002) is the only one that meets the qualification top players. This was a rapid game. The most entertaining example is the following: [FEN ""] [Event "...


20

Both recording checks and draw offers are personal preference, and neither is required in your notation. I actually do record both checks as "+" or "++", and draw offers as "(d)". I know I am not the only one to note draw offers as I have friends, who do the same. I also record times. The purpose of the notation is so you, or the arbiter, can play back ...


19

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: Appendix C. Algebraic notation C.12 The offer of a draw shall be marked as (=) As with a number of the laws regarding recording of the moves this is not strictly enforced by arbiters. I did once play in a tournament in which a very junior arbiter delivered a short harangue to us players telling us to record draw ...


18

Those are just the rules of the game. You could absolutely try to make the case that moving into check in such a situation should be legal, but playing by those rules wouldn't be chess anymore (it would be some variant). You could also ask why stalemate is a draw and not a win, even though the latter result would make more sense in a real battle. These are ...


17

You can move your other piece to make your queen attack the king in a normal position such as: 4r3/8/8/2QB1k2/p5q1/3K4/8/8 w - - 0 1 1.Bf3+**[Discovered-Check] (1.Be4+**[Double-check]) But you are forbidden to do so if the piece you move will put your own king in check, such as: 3r4/8/8/2QB1k2/p5q1/3K4/8/8 w - - 0 1 1.Bf3**[illegal-move] Here both ...


17

Triple check is impossible, unless you want to count an x-ray attack as the third check. A queen and rook attacking on the same file is normally thought to be one check.


17

I will answer from a different perspective: why Racing Kings (RK) has a rule to allow black a chance to draw, and why the same logic doesn't apply to chess. What is Racing Kings (RK)? Background for those unfamiliar with RK: Both sides start with all pieces (no pawns), arranged on the first 2 ranks of the chessboard, white on the right, black on the left. ...


15

Yes, of course he can; you're indeed in check. Imagine if checks didn't exist--then on the next move, if your king hasn't moved, he could just take your king with his rook.


15

There is a rules in chess called Threefold repetition rule. This rule states that you can claim a draw if you are about to repeat the the position for a third time. This subsumes a situation called perpetual check which also leads to a draw. So what you did in your game wasn't a case of extortion or abusing a flaw in the game - it was completely by the ...


14

What you are describing is Perpetual Check: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_check It is covered in the rules of chess and the result of such a game is a draw. It is up to your opponent to try and avoid this situation if he thinks he can win. Conversely, if you might lose you should try to get into some kind of draw situation to avoid a loss. ...


14

The important part is that you and your friend agree on what to say and when. If you both agree that queen check (or gardez) is a nice thing to say, then go ahead and say it. I suggest taking the time before your next game to clear this up. Also, if you play any friends of your friend then ask them too what they prefer. That being said, if your friend want ...


13

If it is your opponent's turn to move and none of your opponent's pieces can move other than his king, and the king would be in check on any square it could move to, we would call that stalemate. In case of stalemate, neither player wins – the game is drawn. Here are a few examples: A simple one with just 3 pieces on the board with Black to move: Here, ...


13

https://github.com/ddugovic/Stockfish Very active development, this is the Stockfish version used by lichess. What you need to do is search this macro: #ifdef THREECHECK Evaluation function: https://github.com/ddugovic/Stockfish/blob/master/src/evaluate.cpp Checks are given extra bonus unlike normal chess: if (pos.is_three_check()) ...


12

The king can capture the enemy queen, as long that does not place it in check from another piece.


12

Your "checkless" chess AI would run into problems with the stalemate rule. It would consider the poaition with white king on a6, white pawn a7, black king a8, a win for White because wherever Black moves his king it will get captured. In standard chess, of course, the position is a draw.


12

To look at this systematically, let's say white is attempting to triple-check black. At the start of white's move, black's king is not in check. So we have to go from zero checks to three checks. When a piece moves: the previous square it occupied becomes vacant (possibly creating a discovered check) the target square becomes occupied (possibly creating a ...


12

Hi David and welcome to chess.stackexchange.com. This is a common question. It's illegal to move a king into check, or to leave it in check. This includes moving a king adjacent to the opposing king. If you have no legal moves then the game is over: if your king is in check then you are checkmated and you have lost, otherwise you are stalemated and the ...


12

The answer depends on whether or not the games are being recorded. The way this is elliptically referenced in the FIDE Laws of Chess is that a distinction is made between, on the one hand, standard time controls (where moves must be recorded by the players), rapid and blitz games played at a sufficiently high level that there are enough arbiters to record ...


11

A move can be illegal because the opponent could "take" the king. This "taking the king" move does not need to be "legal". See Can a piece pinned to my king put the opponent's king in check? and Is the king actually in check if the attacking piece cannot be moved?


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