40

You are right, this is nonsense. From the FIDE laws of chess, article 5: The game is drawn when the player to move has no legal move and his king is not in check. The game is said to end in ‘stalemate’. If capturing en passant is possible, it is a legal move so if it is the only option, Black is required to play the move. (Or not to move at all and lose ...


33

The basis of your question comes down to whether a piece is truly in position to execute an en passant if it is otherwised pinned. The answer can be found in the FIDE rules stated just before the explicit mention of the en passant: "Positions as in (a) and (b) are considered the same, if the same player has the move, pieces of the same kind and colour ...


31

Really interesting question. I think the following shows that such a situation is sort of possible, depending on how you define the pin: [StartFlipped "0"] [FEN "7k/4p3/8/2KP3r/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... e5 and 2. dxe6 is illegal. The check would go from being stopped by both pawns, to being stopped by neither.


29

It is not checkmate if the other player has any legal move that gets them out of check. Capturing the checking piece is one such way; whether the capture is en passant or not is irrelevant for the purpose of this question. In this case, an en passant capture is the only legal move. If the other player didn't know the en passant rule, I suppose they might ...


22

From FIDE rules (3.7 e): When a pawn reaches the rank furthest from its starting position it must be exchanged as part of the same move on the same square for a new queen, rook, bishop or knight of the same colour. The player’s choice is not restricted to pieces that have been captured previously. This exchange of a pawn for another piece is called ‘...


18

From Wikipedia: Allowing the en passant capture is one of the last major rule changes in European chess that occurred between 1200 and 1600, together with the introduction of the two-square first move for pawns, castling, and the unlimited range for queens and bishops (Davidson 1949:14,16,57). Spanish master Ruy López de Segura gives the rule in his 1561 ...


18

Yes, given that the opponent helps the capturing side, it is possible to capture en passant two times or more in a row. Here's an example from a real game. Click on the arrows to view the game moves in forwards and backwards play. I have typed in a command to show the moment just before the two captures occur, specifically just before Black does the first ...


17

As White's previous move was pawn on h2 to h4 then pawn g4xh3 is a legal en passant capture. For more info - see Rule 3.7.d of the laws of chess


16

I'll give an example that isn't from a world championship match, and isn't recent either. In fact, it doesn't even have an en passant capture in it. (Bear with me.) It does have a world champion playing in it, though, and more importantly, I hope it illustrates the following: even when no en passant capture actually occurs in a game, the fact that it is ...


15

It is taught together with the rest of the rules of the game. You playing for years without knowing about it has nothing to do with that, either you learn the rules or you don't, you won't self-discover them no matter how many years you play, specially not when your playing pool is limited solely to your friends who may not know certain rules either. So you ...


15

According to this page the shortest known mate by en passant capture is in 5.5 moves (that is, White mates on move 6), and was published by Benko in Chess Live & Review in 1976: [Title "Pal Benko's 5.5 move e.p. helpmate"] [Fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w - - 0 0"] 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. g4 d6 4. g5 Kd7 5. Bh3+ f5 6. gxf6#


15

How can we teach this rule to a Beginner? (in a plain language or simplified way or associating any story to it) The history gives the story. At one time pawns could only move one square at a time even on the first move. But this made the game a bit slow. To speed it up the rule was changed to allow a pawn to move either one square, as before, or two ...


14

An en passant capture is a move that involves pawns, exclusively. In particular, the king is not allowed to capture en passant. From Wikipedia (link): It is a special pawn capture, that can only occur immediately after a pawn moves two ranks forward from its starting position, and an enemy pawn could have captured it had the pawn moved only one square ...


14

Positions are considered the same if and only if the same player has the move, pieces of the same kind and colour occupy the same squares and the possible moves of all the pieces of both players are the same. After 5...Ra8, the same player has the move, pieces of the same kind and colour occupy the same squares and the possible moves of all the pieces of ...


14

I believe the en passant rule is designed to cope with the fact that pawns do not move backwards, hence if the en passant rule did not exists you could have a lot of blocked positions, making play slower and probably more drawish. Differently from pawns, pieces can move backwards, so the black Knight in your example still has the possibility to move ...


14

En passant can only be played when the enemy pawn moves over your pawn's capture square during it's first move (moving 2 squares); so the answer to both condition 1 and 2 is no. It is not possible for a pawn to en passant twice in a row. My understanding is in early chess pawns could only move one space at a time, so when the 2 move rules was added they ...


14

Perhaps it helps if you remember the (presumed) reason for having this special move. Originally pawns were only allowed to make single steps. This meant that pawns on adjacent files could not pass each other without running into the danger of being captured. When the double step was introduced, pawns on adjacent files could suddenly pass each other (which ...


13

According to wikipedia: En passant (from French: in passing) is a move in chess. As far as i can find, 'In passing' is the translation of the name of the move, however it is not actually spoken as 'en passant' is used instead. One explanation for the appearance of this term is that Lasker, the author of the book, accidentally translated the word. ...


13

The same question has also been discussed and answered in the lichess forum, and as mentioned by others already, the answer is 11 half-moves for white and 12 half-moves for black. You might find some interesting examples and additional info there. Not knowing that this problem had already been solved before, I did a brute-force proof back then (see my post ...


12

I would love to see the position; please add it to your question somehow (we can always edit it to look nice). However, there is no such rule. Either your computer doesn't implement captures en passant (improbable these days) or the capture was not valid for some other reason.


11

Maybe your pawn happened to be pinned? 8/8/7r/5K1k/7p/8/6P1/7R w - - 0 1 1. g4+# hxg3?? 2. Rxh5


10

In 12th (Final) game of Anand - Topalov match, en passant did come into play. Position after 36...g5+ 37. fxg6 is an en passant capture. Topalov still lost the game; however, if he did not have en passant capture, he would've lost much sooner. [FEN ""] [Event "World Championship Match"] [Site "Sofia BUL"] [Date "2010.05.11"] [EventDate "2010.04.26"] [...


8

En passant is, for a lack of a better word, an ugly rule. It does not flow logically from the "fundamental" rules of chess - it is an exception that serves a specific purpose: to prevent players from forcing walled positions with their pawns, effectively killing any activity in the game (at least, that is my understanding). By allowing a player to capture en ...


8

You can't take a pawn en passant if that pawn just made a discovered check to your King: 8/8/7k/8/2p5/8/3P4/2B1K3 w - - 0 1 1. d4+ After 1. d4+ Black is in check (their king is attacked by the White bishop on c1) so he has to move his King. 1...cxd3 is not allowed. Also, it can't be carried out if your pawn is pinned to your king: 6k1/8/8/8/2p5/8/B2P4/...


8

Long ago, pawns were only allowed to move 1 square at a time (side note: fianchettoing was therefore very common then, as playing e3 or d3 opens the diagonal for one bishop, only to block the other!) ; the rules were modified to allow pawns to move two squares ahead on its first move in order to speed up the game. Now, this had some major impact ...


8

A pawn which 'exposes' itself to en passant will be distinct from one that doesn't. Say, for a black pawn on a4 and a white pawn on b4: giving black the option of playing ...axb3 at any time after b2-b4 means that the moves b2-b4 and b3-b4, which seemingly lead to the same position, have long-term implications as it depends too much on the past. In ...


8

The OP asked me to provide sources supporting the claim that the double step was originally a double move. I'll do my best. The immediate predecessor of modern chess, the game Shatranj, did have pawns (sarbaz), but no double step. The pieces in Shartanj had relatively weak powers, and gameplay, especially in the opening, was generally slow. In medieval ...


8

For as long as I can remember, there has never been a rule like that in any official matter. The pawn captures en passant and lately it can promote like any other pawn.


8

In simple words: if a pawn jumps two squares and lands right next to an opponent's pawn, then the opponent can capture that pawn in the following turn as if it had moved only 1 square. That is, only right after you made your jump, your opponent has the option to take by en passant, past that turn it is no longer allowed. So keywords to remember: two square ...


7

An en passant capture is just a capture. There are no special rules other than its definition, as described in the question. Put another way, you capture the pawn as if it had only moved forward one space. Of course, the capture isn't exempt from the rest of the rules. For example, you can't make a move that leaves your king in check, so you can't make an ...


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