30

The goal for Black in breaking the London System is to remove White's dark bishop from the game. This is present in almost every losing London System. Hikaru Nakamura plays the London, and makes it very clear he is not willing to trade his dark bishop - even going so far as to play h3 with the sole intention of hiding the bishop on h2. To break the London, ...


28

I will preface this by saying that I'm a 2150 USCF player who has had the same issues that you are struggling with in the past. What I'm about to tell you comes straight from my own experiences playing chess all these years. Don't study or memorize any theory straight up. I find it difficult to retain information like that and the potential for it to be ...


25

Probably the most aggressive opening without being unplayable in chess is Double Muzio Gambit in King's Gambit, which suicide-bombs two minor pieces at f7 for a wildest possible opening attack: [FEN ""] [Title "Double Muzio Gambit"] 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O! {Strongest continuation, Muzio gambit! White sacrifices a piece for better ...


24

Perhaps the most insanely aggressive opening that's remotely playable is the Halloween Gambit, [FEN ""] [Title "Halloween Gambit"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5?! It seems to defy logic that White can sac a whole knight for merely a pawn and a speculative advantage in space and time, but sometimes aggression has a logic all its own. The White ...


20

I can't believe that no one mentioned the Lolli attack, very similar to the fried liver attack, but the Lolli attack is better! [FEN ""] [Title "Lolli Attack"] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 d5 5.exd5 Nxd5 6.d4 exd4 7.O-O From there, you actually have 4 main variations, watch this youtube video, it will tell you everything you need to know about the ...


17

The Open Sicilian (1.e4 c5 followed by 2.Nf3 and 3.d4) counts, in my view. White immediately gets a lead in development and great attacking chances, in return for some positional sacrifice, most notably the 1vs2 pawns in the center. This opening is famous for its wild sacrificial attacks, in my opinion even more so than the king's gambit. Piece sacrifices ...


15

Sometimes, one way to get overtly aggressive in a reasonably sound way is to throw out an early g4 pawn thrust in an otherwise vanilla, mainline position. For instance, in the Anti-Meran 6.Qc2 variation of the Semi-Slav, the gambit move 7.g4!? was popularized by Shirov and Shabalov: [fen ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Qc2 Bd6 7.g4!? ...


14

I will assume here that you are talking about sacrificing pieces and not just pawns, which require less compensation. For a sacrifice to work out you generally need to either 1) checkmate the opposing king, or 2) eventually gain the material back. There are other scenarios, but they're less common and I will ignore them here. Often goal 2 occurs because ...


13

Indirectly Benoni Defense is one of the best opening for modern chess player. (A66) [FEN ""] [Title "Beoni Defense"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4.Nc3 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 g6 7.f4


12

Two interesting gambit trees to be aware of are: 1) The Scotch/Goring/Italian/Danish gambit complex (there's a lot of opportunity to transpose among them). These start out with: 1. e4 e5 2. d4 ed 3. c3 (Danish) 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 ed 4. c3 (Goring) 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 ed 4. Bc4 (Scotch) 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. d4 (Italian) The ...


12

Let me recommend two sharp opening variations for the black pieces: the Sicilian Najdorf and Semi-Slav Botvinnik variation. They lead to dynamic and complicated positions with chances for both sides. They are excellent for playing for a win with the black pieces. To master one or both of these variations, I recommend getting at least one modern book per ...


12

The London System is ECO D02. [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 I'm liking c5 as it helps you clear some of White's pawns, offers the pawn in a sham-sacrifice sort of way (Qa5+ followed Qxc5) or allows the Bishop to move with tempo (Bxc5, similar to the Queen's Gambit.) Here's a sample game by Erik Lundin and Hans Ek, from 1963. Doesn't look too awful:...


11

The Smith-Morra Gambit is aggressive for white. [fen ""] 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 (4.Bc4 cxb2 5.Bxb2) White has sacrificed a pawn (or two) to free up his development.


11

The Alekhine's defence (1.e4 Nf6) is also a great attacking weapon for black, as it is a highly aggressive and provocative opening that lures white into overextending its centre, which can then be targeted (generally) via the knights on c6 and b6, trading the knight on f3 for your light square bishop, and sometimes even castling on the queen side to really ...


11

Sicilian Defense, Dragon Variation, Yugoslav Attack Another pretty sharp opening for both sides is The Sicilian Dragon, with the Yugoslav Attack being one of the sharpest variations. It differs from most of the openings listed here because it's not a gambit, but still a very sharp and dangerous opening with lots of threats for both White and Black. 9. Bc4 ...


10

As an ex-player, I draw on a wider range of experiences, like go and scrabble. Most folk do not sit down and learn the tournament wordlist by rote starting AA and working to ZYZZYVA. You learn words with 'hooks', anagrams and high-probability pickups (the letters RETAIN combine with any letter except ABQVXYZ to make a bonus word). In the opening moves of go, ...


9

Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense Very sharp response to the Ruy Lopez. In blitz it is playable at all levels. At slower time-controls, should be solid even for master play. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5


9

Czechoslovakian Master Karel Prucha formulated some correct principles on how to play the Albin Counter Gambit and published them in Ceskoslovensky Sach 9/1962: 1. The Albin is playable only if it is treated as a pure gambit. Black should not try to regain the pawn by attacking White's e5-pawn, but must continue in gambit style with ...f7-f6. 2. ...


9

You seem to enjoy tactical play, so there are a few options for you against 1. d4. As it appears you prefer gambits over other openings, consider looking at the relatively offbeat Budapest Gambit which is characterized by the opening moves 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e5 where after 3. dxe5 black can reply with either 3...Ne4 or 3...Ng4 with the latter being more popular....


9

Additionally to Andrew's answer, I'd suggest to have a look at the Benko Gambit (a.k.a. Volga Gambit): [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 It is a sound and deep opening. If the gambit is accepted, it leads to sharp play and dynamic positions.


9

I like to play Benoni, because black has many chances to win. Also it is very asymmetrical from the pawn structure, so the chance to play draw isn't really high. [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4. Nc3 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 You just have to be careful, with the white d pawn. Never ever let it to d6. You will play g6 with Bg7. If everything goes right, you ...


9

They are related, but probably not the same. If you play an opening like the King's Indian you are probably an aggressive, attacking player, but you may rely more on the understanding of the position than on tactical tricks. Similarly, there are certain types of position where accurate calculation is required but with defensive purposes. Aggressive and ...


8

No. The evidence I've heard for the argument you saw was that top women's play has a lower draw rate than top men's play. The problem with that line of thinking is that if you look at men's games at the same Elo level as the top women, about 2500-2600, the draw rate is the same.


8

Two gambits that your opponents would likely play into a fair amount, and are defined by move two, are the Latvian Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5, like a reversed King's Gambit) and the Albin Counter-gambit (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5). Between the two, the Albin is considered more sound, and even sees top-level games from the likes of Morozevich and Nakamura. The Latvian is ...


7

This answer is a counterpoint to Prucha's principles, as given in xaisoft's answer, in particular the first principle: The Albin is playable only if it is treated as a pure gambit. Black should not try to regain the pawn by attacking White's e5-pawn, but must continue in gambit style with ...f7-f6. As mentioned in the question, the Albin saw a revival at ...


7

Your profile reminds me of that of a master named David Janowski. His nemesis was a world champion (and a personal friend) name Jose Raul Capablanca. Capablanca published a book called "Chess Fundamentals" which details a number of games he won against Janowski (and others). I would study this book from "Janowski's" point of view. The book is one of the few ...


7

The weakness is b2 with the absence of the bishop. This is James Rizzitano's recommendation against the London system in his book "How to Beat 1 d4": [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 Bf5 The bishop is immune due to the b2 weakness (the rook on a1 will drop).


7

I think you are on to something, and statistically, there is a very good reason to play the Scotch over the Ruy Lopez, but that might not be all there is to it. I think that the main reason is that we are taught that the Ruy Lopez is THE most classical opening, and is the best. I have seen that mindset in SO many books written by the top players over the ...


6

With respect to learning more positional theory, I can't recommend Nimzowitch's My System highly enough. If you haven't already read it, it is really wonderful. He gives plenty of examples but accompanies them with great exposition. My entire style of play has been modeled after the Nimzo hypermodern school. My repertoire: As white: I play your dreaded ...


6

Look through some games where black wins against the London System. Some of these are won using a King's Indian Defense type setup.


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