29

Probably the most aggressive opening without being unplayable in chess is Double Muzio Gambit in King's Gambit, which suicide-bombs two minor pieces at f7 for a wildest possible opening attack: [FEN ""] [Title "Double Muzio Gambit"] 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O! {Strongest continuation, Muzio gambit! White sacrifices a piece for better ...


15

Sometimes, one way to get overtly aggressive in a reasonably sound way is to throw out an early g4 pawn thrust in an otherwise vanilla, mainline position. For instance, in the Anti-Meran 6.Qc2 variation of the Semi-Slav, the gambit move 7.g4!? was popularized by Shirov and Shabalov: [fen ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Qc2 Bd6 7.g4!? ...


12

Sicilian Defense, Dragon Variation, Yugoslav Attack Another pretty sharp opening for both sides is The Sicilian Dragon, with the Yugoslav Attack being one of the sharpest variations. It differs from most of the openings listed here because it's not a gambit, but still a very sharp and dangerous opening with lots of threats for both White and Black. 9. Bc4 ...


12

Let me recommend two sharp opening variations for the black pieces: the Sicilian Najdorf and Semi-Slav Botvinnik variation. They lead to dynamic and complicated positions with chances for both sides. They are excellent for playing for a win with the black pieces. To master one or both of these variations, I recommend getting at least one modern book per ...


11

The Smith-Morra Gambit is aggressive for white. [fen ""] 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 (4.Bc4 cxb2 5.Bxb2) White has sacrificed a pawn (or two) to free up his development.


11

I like to play Benoni, because black has many chances to win. Also it is very asymmetrical from the pawn structure, so the chance to play draw isn't really high. [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4. Nc3 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 You just have to be careful, with the white d pawn. Never ever let it to d6. You will play g6 with Bg7. If everything goes right, you ...


10

Two gambits that your opponents would likely play into a fair amount, and are defined by move two, are the Latvian Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5, like a reversed King's Gambit) and the Albin Counter-gambit (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5). Between the two, the Albin is considered more sound, and even sees top-level games from the likes of Morozevich and Nakamura. The Latvian is ...


9

Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defense Very sharp response to the Ruy Lopez. In blitz it is playable at all levels. At slower time-controls, should be solid even for master play. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5


9

They are related, but probably not the same. If you play an opening like the King's Indian you are probably an aggressive, attacking player, but you may rely more on the understanding of the position than on tactical tricks. Similarly, there are certain types of position where accurate calculation is required but with defensive purposes. Aggressive and ...


8

No. The evidence I've heard for the argument you saw was that top women's play has a lower draw rate than top men's play. The problem with that line of thinking is that if you look at men's games at the same Elo level as the top women, about 2500-2600, the draw rate is the same.


7

The weakness is b2 with the absence of the bishop. This is James Rizzitano's recommendation against the London system in his book "How to Beat 1 d4": [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 Bf5 The bishop is immune due to the b2 weakness (the rook on a1 will drop).


7

I think you are on to something, and statistically, there is a very good reason to play the Scotch over the Ruy Lopez, but that might not be all there is to it. I think that the main reason is that we are taught that the Ruy Lopez is THE most classical opening, and is the best. I have seen that mindset in SO many books written by the top players over the ...


6

I would recommend the Schara-Hennig-Gambit for black: [Title "Schara-Hennig-Gambit"] [fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. cxd5 cxd4 5. Qa4 Bd7 6. Qxd4 exd5 7. Qxd5 Nf6 8. Qd1 Nc6 It is pretty rare (the Tarrasch is 10 times more common after 3…c5), according to the computer it is sound and if ...


6

On top of the exciting Benko gambit, you can consider the Albin counter-gambit. Also, check out the Botvinnik variation. The Grunfeld variation is also an interesting option for sharp play. Here are the starting moves of the Albin counter-gambit: [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5


6

It's a bit difficult to recommend an aggressive line that doesn't fall into the variations that you listed. However, I believe there is an option that may suit your tastes. The Rossolimo with 2. Nc3 is venomous choice that's played at the highest levels and contains many lines that are quite dangerous for black. Here's one of the opening traps: [FEN ""] 1. ...


6

It looks like you are looking for a line that is aggressive, but does not require you to jump into tactical lines right away. If this is the case 1.e4 c5 2.b3 is worth consideration. It is hard to predict where the game will go, but usually the fact that white's dark-squared bishop is aiming at white king via a1-h8 diagonal gives pretty good attacking ...


6

I have a very good gambit for you, with black against 1. d4. it's called Benko gambit: [White "Benko"] [Black "Gambit"] [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 It later gives you some ultra strong attack from the queen side, if white takes cxb5 your next move is a6 and then the opening branches out :)


6

Many engines have adjustable parameters, which allow to alter their playing style. If you mess around it a bit, you can create whole 'engine personalities'... Here, for example, someone though it interesting to create a personality called, the Komodo Kinghunter. Apparently, it does exactly what you are looking for - plays aggressively and not necessarily ...


6

I heard from everyone that only beginners do it for a reason but I can't exactly figure out why nobody else would use that defense. It's not true that nobody but beginners use the Scandinavian - I use it, and my rating is in the 1700s. The opening is, however, somewhat rare; I've only seen it about 4% of the time when I've played 1.e4 in tournament games. ...


5

The London is mostly an attempt to play the Slav in reverse. It is very solid and flexible. Black should be careful not to overreach. Kaufman recommends a King's Indian with a c7-c5 break like Avrukh. I have had luck with the e7-e5 break from the KID. A difficult problem for the original question is if your opponent does not play the London, you have to ...


5

The London system is a system for White where the dark squared bishop is brought out early to f4 after d2-d4. There are several ways in which it can appear: [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 and [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 and [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 This means it is very hard to avoid meeting the London system after White ...


5

Baadur Jobava is probably the most aggressive top player right now. If you go even further up the ranking, Mamedyarov is very aggressive as well. And although he is not one for wild and dubious attacks, Caruana is actually quite uncompromising, his draw rate is very low. Topalov and Morozevich are two names that stand for aggressive chess. But I think ...


4

I've been playing the Smith-Morra for many years now. 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 I generally get a good game even at the USCF expert level.


4

Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do. You will have to adapt to White's play and that is it. Only White can sharpen the game, by entering the line with isolated pawn ( by playing c4 at some point ). The line you chose gives White minimal advantage, according to ECO C ( 2006 ), so I would stay away from it. The position is symmetrical, White is ...


4

Former World Champion Jose R Capablanca felt that 3... Qxd5 was superior to 3... exd5. It once led to a sharp, complicated game which he lost (as White). If White plays 4. Nc3, then 4... Bb5. If White tries to chase the B with 5. a3, then 5... Qa5 pins the a pawn. Note that with the Q off the diagonal, White cannot pin a N on f6 with Bg5 (nor can he play it ...


4

As wrote in my answer to your other question: Jobava and Mamedyarov play very aggressively. Ding Liren and Arkadij Naiditsch are another two top players who regularly risk absolute chaos on the board.


4

If you increase Rybka 3 Dynamic's contempt setting, it sacrifices more and more material in attractive style. The Fritz GUI (sold with Rybka, Komodo, Houdini, Junior, Shredder et al) includes a King's Attack slider in its Handicap and Fun dialog. The Fritz 10 engine in particular avoided closed positions like the plague, and often played for mate. It had ...


4

I looked you up on FIDE's website, and as a roughly 1500-player, the KIA naturally fits your question "How to play king's indian attack aggressively?" If you play it correctly, it already IS an aggressive opening. You cannot get any more aggressive than an opening that basically says "I want to mate your king". The reality is that at higher levels, it is ...


4

I have no experience of playing it, but the Albin countergambit 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e5 might be an option. It's relatively rare but doesn't seem to score too badly compared to the QGD/Slav, with significantly fewer draws than either (see stats here).


3

One of the benefits of the lines shown by Travis J are the transpositions for helping folks like me who do not play 1. d4 d5. I play the Nimzo-Indian and after 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 e6 I can play the d5 push and be in the systems he mentions. An even more aggressive option is available with this move order and that's 3. Nf3 c5 to deviate early. Of course, ...


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