53

Rashid Nezhmetdinov, aka “Super Nezh”, was clearly GM strength, having a plus score in the 20 games he played against World Champions, including a plus score against his friend, Tal. He was also a five-time Russian champion (this title predates the Soviet Union, and is not the same as champion of the Soviet Union). I was a Russian linguist in the Air Force ...


40

Yes, there has been a stalemate in a serious game that is under 30 moves long. According to Tim Krabbe's record site, the fastest such game is 27 moves. [Title "Sibilio-Mariotti, Ravenna 1982"] [fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e5 c5 4. b4 cxb4 5. d4 Nh6 6. a3 bxa3 7. c3 Nf5 8. Nxa3 ...


26

Shirov resigned: the thinking was that despite both sides left with pawns and a knight, the advantage went to Black. Black has an extra pawn and Black's pawn chain is mutually supporting. White is down a pawn and they are split. White's king is buried too deeply in the corner to either prevent a black pawn advance to promotion or to save White's pawns. ...


19

If you really mean "dubious", then no one really fits this description since Steinitz, who liked to, for example, go for walks with his King when playing the King's Gambit as White. But people didn't really know better back then. If you're willing to relax "dubious" to "offbeat", the first player that comes to mind is Bent Larsen, one of the strongest ...


17

Magnus Carlsen drops out of World Championship cycle (contemporaneous chessbase.com article) Largely he didn't like the format (knockout matches rather than round-robin tournament). Carlsen wrote a letter to FIDE explaining why he skipped the Candidates Matches, quoted in part below: After careful consideration I’ve reached the conclusion that the ...


17

Short answer: Since after the bishop recapture on f8 (and not the rook recapture!) white is tactically and positionally completely busted, with 5 active black pieces against a completely exposed king in the centre and no foreseeable chance of consolidation in order to eventually benefit from the material advantage. First observations: 15...Bxf8 is with ...


17

From Quora: What was Bobby Fischer's IQ? (2018): Short answer: In 1958, when Fischer sat a Stanford-Binet test at the age of 15, his score was 180-187. But in today’s terms, Bobby Fischer’s IQ should be 148–155 on the Fifth edition of the Stanford-Binet test, and 150-160 on the WISC-V/WAIS-IV tests administered by Mensa. The only reference provided for ...


15

In order to qualify for the title of Grandmaster, a player must achieve three Grandmaster norms. That is not accurate. The regulations for the award of FIDE titles are given here. There are two ways to become a grandmaster. Achieving norms and reaching a certain rating is one way but there are also Direct Titles. The FIDE handbook defines these like this:...


14

The character Beth Harmon is purely fictional. The series is based off a book by the same title by Walter Tevis. The author had a tendencie to base books drawing from personal experiences but he wasn't a chess prodigy that's for sure. In that time period, there are no valid players that could fit as inspiration for the character (that I can place at least). ...


13

Nobody knows who he played, because nobody has come forward to take credit; however, some chess sleuths compared the moves against various engines and found that there was considerable evidence to support a particular engine (I believe it was called "blitz tiger") as the mysterious Fischer. Because of the incident where Short chatted with Fischer, there ...


13

first of all see here. here is a quote Asked how many moves ahead he can think, Kasparov replied that it depended on the positions of the pieces. "Normally, I would calculate three to five moves," he said. "You don't need more.... But I can go much deeper if it is required." For example, in a position involving forced moves, it's possible to look ...


13

Black has (almost) three connected passed pawns which will be unstoppable. White is not going to promote his pawn without the king, which is far away and likewise is not going to get a passer on the a or b file soon.


12

Looks like I am late to the party. Anyway: Free PGNs of many top players are available here. Almost all 2700+ players are there. As for women, only a few from very top are there. These PGN files have anywhere from few hundred to couple thousand games available for each player. Although this does not fully comply with OPs request, it seems like an ...


12

Just to get started, of the top of my head: Magnus Calsen worked with Jon Ludvig Hammer, Laurent Fressinet, Ian Nepomniachi, Peter Heine Nielsen, Michael Adams, Simen Agdestein, Garri Kasparov. He also had training sessions with Ding Liren and Wesley So. Also, this were his seconds for WCC 2016. Vishy Anand worked with Peter Heine Nielsen, Rustam ...


11

Among World Champions, Alekhine was a top bluffmaster. Capablanca once remarked that "Alekhine's game is 20% bluff". Here's one example of his bluffs. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] [White "Alekhine"] [Black "Erich Cohn"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. e5? This was played in Alekhine vs ...


11

At the very least we know that in 1992 a man that looked and sounded like an aged version of Bobby Fischer played Boris Spassky in a match, and won it. Assuming that this old man was actually not Fischer, we must think of plausible alternatives for who it possibly could've been. What old man besides Bobby Fischer will look like Bobby Fischer and be able to ...


10

The answer is: Yes Krishnan Sasikiran vs Viswanathan Anand FIDE World Cup-C (2002), Hyderabad, rd 2, Oct-05 King's Indian Attack: Yugoslav Variation (A07) 1-0 http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1357060


9

Bobby Fischer's games in the 1965 Capablanca Memorial gained fame because he was denied a visa to travel to Cuba, and was the only player in the tournament who had to play all of his games from New York by telephone. It was especially grueling because those games typically lasted 8 hours or more due to the communications lag.


9

This is an ill defined question, similar to: what is my girlfriend thinking about when we ... ? But to stab at an answer, it would be completely dependent on the position. If the position has many tactical variations possible, the answer will probably be very far, 5, 6 or more moves ahead. If the position is very closed, and positional strategy matters, ...


8

The question therefore is, where did Kasparov misplay the position? No, he did not. All the lines give Black equal chances, no matter what move White chose to play. How did he lose his small positional advantage. He did not lose advantage because there was none in the first place. White position just looks "prettier". He can not stop the freeing d5 ...


8

There's this game by Frank Marshall, about which he claimed his last move excited the spectators in such a way, they showered him with golden coins. However, I've also read the coins were not intended for him, but tossed on the table by those who bet against him, for the winning gamblers to collect. But it was an amazing move though. More info here: http://...


8

Claude Bloodgood, the popularizer of the Grob (1. g4), must be far and away the most famous. At one stage his USCF rating was second only to Gata Kamsky! It doesn't get much worse than murdering your own mother.


8

Yes to both questions. At the highest level of any sport/game/activity, there is an extreme amount of pressure. Being in a foreign city, the quest to find the best move, the knowledge that most chess players will be going over you game, annotators criticizing your every move, and the added pressure of a ticking clock. (Digital clocks don't tick, but most ...


8

Magnus Carlsen had the major saying in the selection. There was no "objective" qualification of any kind, besides the hope to create an interesting line-up. Firouzja was included because he beat Carlsen in the Banter Blitz Cup, so a "rematch" would attract many viewers. Disclosure: I work for chess24. I wasn't involved in the decision process, and I can't ...


7

Albert Einstein vs Robert Oppenheimer - Einstein won obviously :) None of them is a professional chess player, but the game is so famous, simply because everyone wants to see Einstein playing chess!


7

The answer to your question Korchnoi is alive. And playing! He played a match against Wolfgang Ulhmann last week (15-16 February 2015) in the Veterans section of the Zürich Chess Challenge. He won two games and lost two. However, today (22 February 2015) the oldest active GM is the American Arthur B. Bisguier (Elo 2170) born in 1929. Korchnoi was born two ...


7

Not to rain on your hopes - but the problem you're looking for at first appeared in: Troitzky, A. (1924), 500 Endspielstudien, Verlag Kagan, Berlin Troitzky was an impeccable note-taker when it came to chess. This book was End Game Studies and show endgame positions with only with a few endgame moves. It didn't show complete games. ...


7

Surprised this doesn't exist somewhere. A few: '51 WC: Ragozin and Flohr for Botvinnik, and Alexander Konstantinopolsky for Bronstein. '72 WC: Lombardy for Fischer, Geller, Krogius and Nei for Spassky '13/'14 WC's: Carlsen has rotated many people through the position, Hammer seems to be a constant, also had Fressinet and Adams in the '14 match. Anand ...


7

I have read a lot about them over the years, and I have never heard anything that would lead me to believe that they are anything but true Azerbaijanis, and have both played under that flag forever. Both were born in Azerbaijan while it was still part of the Soviet Union. Speaking Russian is simply explained by the fact that since both born in Azerbaijan ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible