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23

Well, I want to give you a third master's opinion, and most coaches teach the London because they can teach students an opening that the students can, for the most part, be mindless for the first 10 moves (d4,Nf3,Bf4,e3,Bd3,0-0,c3,Nbd2,Qe2,Re1, etc.) or so, against almost any black response. Of course, in chess you can never totally ignore what the opponent ...


18

Chess strategy is complex and has several ingredients mingling at the same time. It is true that 3 c3 helps white mantaining two center pawns if black decides for a c:d4 pawn exchange. But black isn't forced to that and the move c3 has some incovenients. To list just two: blocks the c3 square which is the natural place for developing the Q-side knight; ...


16

There is a prerequisite to any aspect of playing chess: NEVER EVER IGNORE YOUR OPPONENT AND THEIR INTENTIONS, FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER! This is of course not very surprising, but nobody has ever become even a halfway decent player by not paying any attention to their opponent (as you noted yourself, you dropped two pieces by not paying proper attention to ...


11

Why is h4 much better than h3? It's very simple. The prospects for the bishop are much better on g3 than h2. On h2 the bishop does nothing useful and it will take a lot of moves to get it back into the game via g1. Black will exert iron control over f4 with pawns on e5 and g5 making the freeing move f2-f4 impossible. On g3 the bishop has a role protecting ...


10

That is the Slav, but the problem for black in many of these lines, and specifically immediately, is that if 3...Bf5, then 4.cd cd 5.Qb3 forces you to sacrifice d5 or b7 since 5...b6 just loses. [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Bf5 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3! b6? 6.e4! (6.Nc3) Bxe4 (6...dxe4 7.Ne5+-) 7.Ne5 a6 8.Ba6! Ra6 9.Qb5 Nd7 10.Nd7! Qd7 (10......


10

The answer is no since f3 would never be played there by any strong player as it is weakening, but has no compensating advantages. That is very close to some virtually-impossible-to-get-to lines in the Bishop's Opening/Vienna game since unlike the queen-pawn London, black has many more ways to throw a wrench into the attempt to play moves without thinking. ...


10

Thus, why is the London System considered safe? Every opening where white starts with 1. d4 is considered safe compared to 1. e4 (provided white doesn't do anything silly) because the queen protects d4. d4 openings are inherently safer than e4 openings. Why do proponents say you can utilize it regardless of what your opponent does? No intelligent, ...


9

The bishop is pretty decent on g5 as well. So after 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 Nh5 4.Bg5 and now black would have to create serious weaknesses on the kingside to hunt down the bishop. But if he just returns the knight, he has lost a tempo. [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 Nh5 4.Bg5 h6 5.Bh4 g5 6.Bg3 Nxg3 7.hxg3


8

It may be to the fact that you are making his bad Bishop into a Monster. After 6...c5, 7. d5 Nh5! and the dark square bishop is free to roam. [FEN "rnbq1rk1/pp2ppbp/3p2p1/2pP3n/2P2B2/4PN2/PP1N1PPP/R2QKB1R w KQ - 1 8"]


7

The weakness is b2 with the absence of the bishop. This is James Rizzitano's recommendation against the London system in his book "How to Beat 1 d4": [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. c3 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 Bf5 The bishop is immune due to the b2 weakness (the rook on a1 will drop).


7

If you want to play c4 against the King's Indian, it's better to go "all in" by having your e-pawn on e4 (so playing a main line against the KID). With the pawn on e3 you're sort of dipping your toe in the water with c4. It's not nearly as effective. There's also an important tactical reason for why c4 is bad (probably why Stockfish gave -1). After 6...c5, ...


7

I don't think the problem is with any c4 in this type of position altogether. I think that if you go for a line like 5.c4 and 6.Nc3 your position is just OK. The particular position you post is maybe a different story as the knight is a bit misplaced on d2 (this leaves the d4 pawn a bit exposed. Many of the moves suggested are right, and exploit this fact ...


7

After 10.h4 g4, the kingside pawn structure is more favorable for White. Black's g- and h-pawns are blocked, they are too far advanced and feel more weak than strong. Black doesn't have possibilies for a kingside attack because of the blocked pawns. White's king will be safe on g1 after castling short. This is the most important factor. Far advanced pawns ...


6

The best way to deal with the "copycat" is to switch to the Queen's Gambit with c4 with the idea of following up at the right time with Qb3 to take advantage of the weakness on b7.


6

The London Defensive System is actually a named line in the Réti Opening. And yes, it is very playable. You don't see this very often nowadays, because White will try to stop Black from playing it. Here is a famous game Réti - Lasker, 1924, in which Lasker went for this line and won convincingly. Look at the position after 9.Nbd2. From my analysis: ...


5

The London is mostly an attempt to play the Slav in reverse. It is very solid and flexible. Black should be careful not to overreach. Kaufman recommends a King's Indian with a c7-c5 break like Avrukh. I have had luck with the e7-e5 break from the KID. A difficult problem for the original question is if your opponent does not play the London, you have to ...


5

The London system is a system for White where the dark squared bishop is brought out early to f4 after d2-d4. There are several ways in which it can appear: [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 and [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 and [fen ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 This means it is very hard to avoid meeting the London system after White ...


5

What are the main points, tactical or otherwise, backing up the Mason Attack? At least for normal (not top GM) players, the main points of the London system (never heard the name Mason Attack before), is to just get out the pieces to natural squares and take it from there. White is not really aiming for an immediate advantage. Pieces are not exchanged ...


5

How you respond depends on your tastes. If you like tactical play then 3. e4 is the Morris Gambit. This is basically the Albin Counter Gambit with colours reversed and an extra tempo. It can lead to very exciting play. If you are more conservative and prefer a quiet life then 3. e3 is the normal move when play can quickly return to more normal lines.


5

I tried this about 15 years ago and after 4. cd cd 5. Qb3 I was soon in a world of pain. I've never tried it since. [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Bf5 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Qb3 There is no good way to defend the b pawn and white's minor pieces flow effortlessly into the attack. Nc3, Bf4, maybe Ne5 at some stage, either e3 or even e4, followed by Bb5. Nb5 ...


5

Move 3 is a bit early for such positional evaluations, but some food for thoughts: after 3...cd 4.ed, e7-e6 will be played, rather sooner than later but then the pawn structure in the center is fixed, which makes it hard for Black to "exploit" his extra central pawn. Any expansion with ...f6 and ...e5 is out of question for at least the next 20 ...


4

Be reassured, there are masters who have almost exclusively played the london system as white. It is an unambitious opening that does not strive for much advantage(though some proponents often claim that because the black player likely has little knowledge of the london system, it is often the case that white get's some positional edge), and instead you must ...


4

It's fine to use the London system at any level. It's also fine to use other openings. It's not easy for someone to knock you out of the game immediately if you play it I suppose, thus it's more solid than some other openings with more immediately tactical lines. However don't be mistaken, every opening involves tactics, they are just pushed down the road a ...


4

If you want to know whether the knight is badly placed on c3, you have to think about your plan. Normally, in d-pawn openings you want to play c4 to attack Black's hold on the center on d5. Here, this is not White's plan. Instead: White may want to play h4-h5 and attack Black on the kingside. This means White may want to follow up with Qd2 and 0-0-0. ...


4

Unaware of any special name given to that full sequence of moves, especially as a 'system' as opposed to an opening variation name. f3 is a major mistake and would not be played except by beginners. there is a difference between qp and kp setups so that they cannot be mirrored well like you asked. Some of the previous move sequences do have a name. It ...


4

With ...e5, Black: Opens a diagonal for the c8-bishop, and Fights for central control. Both of these adhere to chess principles, so planning for ...e5 is a very natural thing for Black.


3

A black player who wants to play the King's Indian, but encounters the London instead, often chooses a system with the move ...d6. For instance, the book "Fighting the anti-King's Indians" by Yelena Dembo advocates such a system. The pawn on d6 restricts white's bishop on f4, and common white plans such as putting a knight on e5. This system scores very well ...


3

It's normal developing move after all. I doubt the knight stands there so badly. It keeps Bg7 stupid as c5 can now be hard for black to achieve. It controls d5 and e4. You probably don't see much point in white's play, but try to find what's black going to do. If you make weird looking move only to force opponent to do the same, your move is probably not so ...


3

According to modern theory, playing the QGD as if you were white is the best option. (That is, of course, just to sell more useless books.) I play an early Bd6 to challenge this system, but the problem I experience is when they don't trade the bishops. The logical plan is to play the KID. The bishop will be "biting on granite." When the time is right, ...


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