33

Mihail Marin simply missed that 1.Ng6 is winning, even faster than 1.Qg6. During opening analysis, and even during a game, sometimes when you find a satisfying continuation you forget to follow Lasker's advice and look for an even stronger one. This is a slight mistake in his analysis, but his evaluation of the variation remains correct (White is winning, ...


15

Since I was playing the English myself, I can tell you why I have found it a good opening for me: Transpositional potential of this opening is stunning! You can lead your opponent out of his/her opening and draw them into the variations they do not know. One small example: 1.c4 c6 Since Black reveals to us that he plans to play Slav/Semi-Slav/Queen's Gambit ...


13

This has nothing to do with 1.d4 being an objectively better move than 1.c4. The moves are just about as good as one another, and sometimes even transpose as you've noted. But 1.d4 was historically considered to be one of the two best opening moves (together with 1.e4) for a very long time, and it is more in line with the basic opening principles that ...


12

Do these factors make the English opening ideal for beginners? No. As a beginner it is OK to study the English along with other openings but what you seem to be suggesting, that it be the only white opening a beginner learns, is very bad. By definition a beginner doesn't know very much about chess and to progress needs to learn much. In openings the ...


11

Obviously black has violated principles such as: don't move a piece twice develop pieces However opening principles are just general guidelines and in very concrete positions like the one at hand they are of little use. There are many established openings where opening principles are broken, so nothing wrong with that. In the final position it is white's ...


10

You can, but if you like most openings with 1.e4, it's probably not the most adequate choice for your "style" (the resulting position will be "slow" rather than a fast exchange of tactical blows. 2.c4 is a legitimate option, but here are a few alternatives you may want to consider: Find some line in the Open Sicilian: this is the ideal, but requires a lot ...


9

One reason that the English openings (either starting with 1. c4 or 1. Nf3) work well at the lower levels is that players are unfamiliar with how to play against it. Most people are taught how to play against 1.e4 and 1.d4, but less attention is focused on teaching people to play against 1.c4. At the grandmaster level, all GMs knows how to play against the ...


7

I think you should stop being afraid of your theory book, and concentrate on fighting your opponent in a game of chess. Especially rated at 1400, you need to experience interesting tactical battles, attacking chess, and basic strategic ideas. Edmar Mednis wrote "A number of students have told me that they like to play 1.e4 except against the Sicilian. Such ...


7

I believe you mean this (correct me if wrong): This refers to time in seconds that it took to complete a move. So in this case (my game), it took White 2.5 seconds to make a move, and 0.9 seconds for Black to respond. Then it took 19.7 seconds for White to make a move, and 1 second for Black to respond. In your case, it took White 9.6 seconds to make a ...


7

It is not the most ambitious choice, but should be playable. It has been played by 2500 rated players. Basically by playing c4 you weaken your dark squares and black could try to take advantage of it by the following set up. [FEN ""] 1.e4 c5 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 g6 4.g3 Bg7 5.Bg2 e6 6.Nge2 Nge7 7.d3 O-O If you are fine with such position go for it. I wouldn't ...


7

It is a matter of choice Many grandmasters (e.g. world champion Viswanathan Anand) have consistently played 1.c4 e5 with Black. Others favour the KID or other defenses : Hedgehog (with b6), symmetrical English (1.c4 c5), Pseudo-Nimzo (with Nf6 and e6), Pseudo-Grünfeld (with Nf6 and d5), Réti (with e6 and d5) or Slav-like (with c6 and d5) defenses... There is ...


6

Don't let anything chase you away from 1.e4! If you want to minimize your theory you can consider a couple other options: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 with 3.c3 1.e4 c5 2.f4 or 2.Nc3 and 3.f4 heading for Grand Prix Attack lines 1.e4 c5 2.d3 heading for King's Indian Attack 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 heading for closed Sicilian 1.e4 c5 2.d4 heading for Smith-Morra Gambit 1.e4 c5 2.b4 ...


6

It's a good question. Just a quick answer with some thoughts to give you some starting ideas, hopefully to be improved later. I've always liked the English exactly for its rich transpositional possibilities, they're endless aren't they? Your intent to divert towards d4 lines via the English is very common. For example Magnus Carlsen often employs it to ...


6

Once you play d4 you are usually leaving the pure English opening and transposing to a queen-pawn opening. Objectively there are positions where it is absolutely better to transpose to a queen-pawn opening but you can certainly build a repertoire around playing the pawn to d3 -- it may just be easier for Black to equalize in some lines. The formation of c4,...


6

In the competitive sense of surprising your opponent it does have its advantages for beginners. However, a few things: 1) A surprise in the English isn't as valuable as a surprise in one of the 1.e4 openings. The reason is that the English is quieter and it's harder for White to tactically profit off of small mistakes on Black's part. 2) The English ...


6

The reality is that you cannot force such openings as black, but you can pick openings that may suit your style. I really think that the Nimzo-Indian/Queens-Indian may suit your style very well. They will not get you queenless positions too often right out of the opening, but the nature of the Nc3 in the Nimzo, and it often getting exchanged resulting in ...


5

This position is discussed in many books, the consensus being that 10... a6 is the best and most flexible move. As you say, black waits for white to reveal their hand, and a6 is generally useful. Play could continue 10... a6 11. Be3 Bf5 or 10... a6 11. Bd2 Rb8. The move 10... Bf5 is a serious alternative since it provokes 11. e4, blocking the diagonal for ...


5

I have only ever played the Maroczy Bind against the sicilian and in the light of this limited knowledge all your propositions make some sense. 1./2. Be2 is where you normally place your bishop in the sicilian binds and it makes sense to refrain from e4 (at least for a time) if you fianchettoed the bishop. I have also read that after the fianchetto the ...


5

This isn't necessarily an answer; it's some amusing searches and information that might help others get a "real" answer. (It just seemed too much for a comment.) I'm not familiar with this setup, so I resorted to "Google-fu". A quick Google search found A10 English, Anglo-Dutch defense. Following forward with 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d4 e5 shows only a single game (...


5

The precise answer depends largely on the database, and the answer is still never yes. If the database includes any players below 2500ish OR it includes blitz or rapid time controls, do NOT attempt to rely on these percentages. Inaccurate moves were likely played and possibly "moved to the top" of the possible moves. You could possibly rely on percentages ...


4

You don't. There is no way at this point to stop white from advancing on the queenside. Playing a5 still makes sense, because short term this will give you the open a-file and longterm this will eliminate a potential weakness that white might take advantage of once he breaks through. Instead of stoping white on the queenside you have to develop play on ...


4

I would definitely classify these positions as rather quiet. Black is lacking the tempo to build up an attacking position, like white does in the sicilian: For example in this line the knight usually goes back to b6, something white (i.e. Nb3) would never play against the dragon. And of course d4 is much easier to achieve for white here, than d5 is for ...


4

According to the Database of 365Chess, the English Wing Gambit has not been tried by a grandmaster in a rated game. Although there might not be a clear refutation, the gambit seems to be somewhat dubious. Compared with most gambits, white does not obtain a quick development. Compared with the Sicilian Wing Gambit, white acquires less control in the center. ...


4

It is either f4 or f3 to defend the threat on f2. Intuitively I prefer the tempo that f2-f3 gets, but the idea of f2-f4 with e2-e4-e5 is probably what the computer likes.


4

No, these winning percentages should be taken with a grain of salt, especially for as early as move 3. The percentages largely depend on the type of players that go for certain lines. For example, if more inexperienced players favour 3.e4 more often, more of the 3.e4 games will have an inexperienced player playing White. The percentages are simply one of ...


4

I also have PowerBook 2019, and Stockfish 10, and I can confirm what you found, but there is an explanation. The moves suggested in the PowerBook are from actual human games. They are intended, specifically, to give the computer a human opening book, rather than it just playing on its own. You will find these games in the database Powergames2019 that came ...


4

IMO, 3...c5 by itself, is not really a problem, after the strongest continuation 4.d4 stockfish gives 0.5, and after 4th move in the game stockfish gives equality. And I think your reasoning is fine, it is generally good to trade a c-pawn for d-pawn. But it looks like it is a part of bigger problem: You made too many pawn moves 5...h6 And 6...f5, and later ...


3

In the Grandmaster Repertoire series, there are three books covering the English opening from white's perspective, written by GM Marin in 2009 and 2010: Volume 1, Volume 2 and Volume 3. More recently, in 2016, IM Cummings wrote a repertoire book based on e3 systems, rather than fianchettoing the bishop with g3. Update: In 2018, a new repertoire series from ...


3

In general, the best way to prevent Black from copying you is to go for the d4 push. If you play the e3 system, it is indeed very easy for Black to equalize with no problems at all. It's best to go for the main line with 1. c4, 2. Nc3, 3. g3, 4. Bg2, 5. Nf3, 6. 0-0. If Black copies you up to castling, then you immediately go for 7. d4! with a slight edge. ...


3

There is a line against the Sicilian on which, as far as I know, there is almost no theory. In some order it involves the moves e4, Nf3, c3, Bd3. It will probably induce your opponent to underestimate you, but you continue with Bc2 and d4 and he will be surprised to see that you have quite a nice game. It does not give you much of an advantage but you can ...


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