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27

This is kind of out there (virtually nobody plays it as white and even fewer allow it as black) but there is a rather crazy queen sacrifice line in the Grand Prix: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 "] 1.e4 c5 2.f4 d5 3.Nf3 dxe4 4.Ng5 Nf6 5.Bc4 Bg4!? 6.Bxf7+ Kd7 7.Qxg4+ Nxg4 8.Be6+ Kc6 9.Bxg4 5...Bg4!? by black is quite rare and ...


23

A commonly known knight sacrifice by white is the Fried Liver Attack: [FEN ""] [ECO "C57"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5?! (5... Na5 {The main line.} 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 {Black has compensation in form of initiative for the pawn.}) 6. Nxf7!? (6. d4 {The Lolli variation.}) Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6 8. Nc3 White has a strong attack against ...


22

The Cochrane Gambit: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nxf7 This is relatively sound gambit, Topalov has played it against Kramnik. The Traxler Gambit: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 Bc5 5. Nxf7 Bxf2 6. Kf1 Qe7 7. Nxh8 White does have an option of taking on f7 with the bishiop 5. Bxf7 which leads to only a pawn sacrifice and less ...


20

The 'Halloween Gambit' or 'Müller-Schulze Gambit' is a knight gambit in the (often characterized as dull) Four Knights Game: [FEN ""] [White "Blokje"] [Black "Platypussy"] [StartPly "7"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe5 5. d4 Nc6 6.d5 Ne5 7.f4 Ng6 8.e5 Ng8 9.Bd3 Bb4 10.O-O Bxc3 11.bxc3 d6 12.e6 fxe6 13.dxe6 Nf6 14.g4 O-O 15.g5 Ne8 16.f5 Ne5 17....


17

The Albin Countergambit is not to be feared, particularly. White does quite well after the simple 3. dxe5. My chess database of master games shows that white wins or draws 80% of the games after 3. ... d4 which is Black's best response. Now, before I go down the rabbit hole, please bear in mind that strong masters probably don't visit this site. For ...


15

The Perenyi Gambit is an important theoretical variation that has been favored by GMs like J.Polgar or A.Shirov. White sacrifices at least one piece, and often two: [FEN ""] [ECO "C57"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e6 7. g4!? e5 8. Nf5 g6 9. g5 (9.Bg2) gxf5 10. exf5 d5 11. Qf3 d4 See, for instance, Polgar-Anand, 1999. Or this ...


14

The Danish gambit isn't very popular these days because of the Schlechter Defense. The idea is to take the gambit pawns but return them quickly. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Bc4 cxb2 5. Bxb2 d5 5...d5 initiates the Schlechter Defense. The mainline continues 6.Bxd5 (6.exd5 Nf6 closes the position and lets Black develop, still a pawn up) Nf6 7.Bxf7+...


14

It looks like your position fell apart pretty early on, a symptom of poor opening theory. Your King and Queen were exposed to attack within the first few moves, and White ruthlessly exploited that opportunity. The first move that Stockfish classifies as a blunder (yes, there's more than one) is 5. … h6?? where you attempt to directly attack the advancing ...


12

The fact that an opening has the word "Defense" in the name usually signifies nothing more than the fact that it is a move by Black that leads into that opening. For instance, if White plays 1.c4 it is simply called the English Opening. But if, after 1.e4, Black plays 1...c5, then we reach Sicilian Defense positions; or if Black plays 1...e6 instead it is a ...


12

Not sure if this is considered a gambit, but one of the lines of the Steinitz variation of the Caro Kann defense involves white sacrificing a knight: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 "] [Event "IBM Man-Machine, New York USA"] [Site "New York, NY USA"] [Date "1997.05.??"] [Round "6"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Deep Blue"] [Black "...


12

If you are feeling more ambitious then the bizarre looking 1.e4 e5 2.d4 exd4 3.c3 Qe7!? is recommended by Viktor Bologan (former 2700 player). Having looked into it a bit, I believe him when he says it's better for black. That said Allure's answer is a simpler line to learn in some ways and is very reliable - quite an interesting endgame too.


11

You ask whether gambit play is the main way for black to play for a win, but instead of gambit play specifically, the issue is more generally one of unbalancing the position (and this is true regardless of which color one has). Sacrificing material for some other type of compensation is certainly one way to do this, but it is only one of many. Generally ...


11

I play Benko as black and am a FM. The most trouble I have in quick games is with declined cxb5 a6 b6 line. Without the a line open I just do not have the play that Benko player craves. Also, I noticed that stronger(IM+) players tend to go for the b6 line, while weaker players either take the pawn on a6 or decline the gambit with something else. For example ...


10

The Cochrane Gambit sacrifies his Knight for a few things: He sacrifies the Knight for 2 pawns After Kxf7, Black loses castling rights and is dangerously in the center. Blacks King-side is basically destroyed with only the g and h pawns and it is not easy to find the best square for the Black King. Usually White will check with the Bishop with Bf4 and if ...


10

No, it's not a gambit; a gambit is 'just' a sacrifice which is part of (well-known) opening theory, nothing more, nothing less. But, technically, what you describe is not even a real sacrifice, but a 'sham sacrifice'. Wikipedia gives the following definitions: Real versus sham Rudolf Spielmann proposed a division between sham and real sacrifices: In a '...


9

Declining the gambit Not really. White is at an advantage accepting, and will fall to a disadvantage if the gambit is declined. Maintaining a closed position Well, considering White aggressively played 1. d4 .. 2. c4 there is no closing this position up. The rest of the game will be open. Maybe 3. e3 This option is so-so. [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e5 3. ...


9

A flexible and well respected approach is to take the e-pawn, put knights on f3 and d2, and follow up with a king side fianchetto. You will find this article very useful on how to deal with it. Patience is the key. Don't try to "refute" it as soon as you can. It is a perfectly playable opening for black. But play prophylactic moves that develop and reduced ...


9

First of all, I should point out that it's actually simplest to avoid the Muzio altogether with Black; i.e. meeting 1 e4 e5 2 f4 exf4 3 Nf3 g5 4 Bc4 with 4...Bg7 (the Hanstein Variation) or 4...Nc6! (transposing to a line of the Bishop's Gambit which is probably favourable for Black. But that doesn't really answer your question, does it? :) After 1 e4 e5 2 ...


9

I've used BDG countless number of times and won virtually everytime over weaker players. This is a dangerous opening if Black simply plays normal development moves, quite tricky to play in a 5-minute blitz game. White has to attack because he is a pawn down. The most direct and surprisingly effective setup is: Position the light bishop on the d3-h7 ...


9

Well, it is funny that 4.Nc3 is then the most popular move, with 4.d4 a distant second. In practice though, 4.d4 scores a very high 73.3% for white, compared to only a typical 56.7% for 4.Nc3. In addition, Stockfish much prefers 4.d4, and it is not even close (-.54 to +.92). I will take that big center, and get my pawn back with an open f-file any day. The ...


8

A gambit can be proven to be unsound by using a modern chess engine. Having said this, I would like to mention a comic gambit, known as the Fred defense: [FEN ""] 1.e4 f5 2.exf5 Kf7 3.Qh5+ g6 4.fxg6+ Kg7 5.gxh7 Rxh7 6.Qg4+ Kh8 White has picked up 2 pawns. In return, the black king has done an artificial castle and black's pieces are ready to develop and ...


8

Two gambits that your opponents would likely play into a fair amount, and are defined by move two, are the Latvian Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5, like a reversed King's Gambit) and the Albin Counter-gambit (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5). Between the two, the Albin is considered more sound, and even sees top-level games from the likes of Morozevich and Nakamura. The Latvian is ...


8

Spielmann Gambit [Event "?"] [ECO "B02"] [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/ b - - 0 1"] [Setup "1"] 1. e4 d5 2. Nc3 (2...d4 {Probably the best move} 3. Nce2 {And probably the only reasonable retreat. White is losing the advantage of playing as White side here, that's true. That's why this is an 'unusual' reply. Both sides gonna fight for e5 square ...


8

The Frankenstein-Dracula variation of the Vienna game features a Rook sacrifice by Black (effectively an exchange sacrifice however, since the Knight will not escape). [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 Impressively, this variation seems to favour Black.


8

While it's a gambit by Black, what about Tal's gambit? Black is scoring 55% in 228 grandmaster and elite correspondence games after 1 e4 c5; 2 f4 d5; 3 exd5 Nf6. I'd call Black doing better than 50% in that many top games an advantage. (And 55% is better than Black's score in any of the main non-gambit responses to 2 f4.)


7

I checked my main games database and my book on the Smith-Morra, "The Modern Morra Gambit" by FM Hannes Langrock. I could find no examples of high-level players successfully employing this strategy to launch a kingside attack. The Smith-Morra focuses very strongly on quick central control and development, so it makes good sense to me that white's play will ...


7

[FEN ""] 1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 f5?! This is the Colorado Gambit. If you are looking for a good solid opening, try looking up some of the following: The Four Knights Game Italian Game The Ruy Lopez The French Defence The Sicilian Defence Queens Gambit This is more than enough for the beginning. All the best!


7

Well, both sides are trying to develop their pieces. For White, Bc4 develops his bishop and points at the important f7 square. Nf3 develops his knight and controls d4 and e5. He could also eventually now play Ng5 aiming again at f7. Black also wants to develop his pieces. ...Nf6 is often one of the first developing moves Black makes, clearing out pieces ...


7

I think f6 is an uninspiring move. It doesn't force anything, blocks the Knight on g8, and exposes the King. 365chess.com says that Black's win percentage is wretched after f6; in fact it's the weakest reply with Black winning only about 16% of the games. Good continuations include the trade of Knights in the middle with 5. Nxd4 Nxd4 6. Qxd4 or 5. O-O. ...


7

I've taken a look at this gambit before as I play it frequently in blitz games, and I don't have very much faith in it for white. (Usually my games are from a different move order with c4 included for white). The biggest problem with the gambit is that it can be quite simply declined with 3... g6 and what has white really accomplished? There's nothing ...


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