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24

One option is to play 1... e6 against 1. d4 anyways! After 1. d4 e6, white doesn't really have a choice other than to transpose into a standard opening anyways. If white plays 2. e4, well that's just the French Defense that you know and love. If white plays something else, like 2. c4 (as most Queen's Gambit players will), then you have a few options: ...


21

This question is a good first stop for students of the opening. Comparing the two: 1.e4 rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/4P3/8/PPPP1PPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq e3 0 1 Less influence over the centre: 1.e4 doesn't stop the freeing pawn moves 1...c5 (Sicilian Defence), 1...d5 (except at top level, Scandinavian Defence), 1...e5 or 1...f5 (was Black going to weaken his king ...


19

9.dxc5? is a horrible positional blunder. The Grunfeld for black allows white a big center, and his idea is to chip away at it, or force it to advance, and then chip away at it. That center controls a lot of nice squares, and is very desirable. 9.dxc5? by white voluntarily does what black is trying to achieve in a very bad way, and worse, it turns the Bg7 ...


15

Unfortunately for you, there is no such opening. You see, the problem with 1.d4 is that d pawn is protected from the very start, unlike his "colleague" e pawn. While it is possible to cut down on theory learning against 1.e4 by simply attacking the e pawn ( Alekhine's defense, Scandinavian defense, Petroff defense in a way ) thus forcing White's response, ...


14

In the vast majority of the cases, 4....d6 and 4....0-0 transpose into each other. However, with 4....0-0 black keeps the option of playing c6 and d5. Recently, this idea has been played by GM Jobava, known for his original approach in the opening: Lupulescu-Jobava, So-Jobava and Vitiugov-Jobava. About the last game, chess.com comments "Just giving away ...


13

Rudolph Spielmann, a great advocate of the French Defense, would play e6 against d4, to give White the chance to transpose into the French defense with e4. When Rubenstein played c4 instead, Spielmann played f5 and went into a Dutch defense/Stonewall formation, rather than play d5, which seems to give White an edge. If White plays c4 on the second move ...


12

The key ideas for Black in the Queen's Indian Defense is to: Restrain White in the center Quick Development The Queen's Indian Defense can be reached after the moves: [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 In the Queen's Indian Defense, black is going aim his light-squared bishop and knight at e4 in order to restrain the moves e4 and to prevent d4 ...


12

I don't think it's a good idea. Firstly, no 1.d4 player will go for 2.e4, unless they are also 1.e4 players and really, really good at playing against the Caro-Kann. More importantly, you may like to play the Slav against d4+c4, and the Caro against d4+e4, but so far white has only played 1.d4. You lose options in case white doesn't follow up with a quick ...


11

After 3.cxd5 exd5 4.Nc3, if black plays 4....Nf6 or 4....Be7, then white indeed succesfully transposed to the mainlines of the QGD and avoided any transpositions to the Slav. Black's best reply is probably 4....c6, after which white has 3 good options: 5.Nf3, 5.Bf4 and 5.Qc2. After 5.Nf3 black can play 5....Bd6 or 5....Bf5. After 5.Bf4 black's best moves ...


10

I have played the Catalan for something like 25 years, and to me the big secret explaining the opening's popularity is the following: You can expect a massive score against weaker players. The key strategic factors in a successful Catalan are: 1) You achieve control/dominance over all four central squares, something rarely seen in other openings. (By the ...


10

They are indeed equally good. 1.e4 tends to lead to more open positions (the board is not cluttered up with pawns and pieces can move around freely) than 1.d4, which it is why it is recommended for less experienced players, since you have to learn how to use your pieces first to be good at playing more closed positions, where you constantly have to decide ...


10

You can play the Stonewall defence with black as well, as quid suggested. You can start with a Dutch and get the familiar structure (just an example): [FEN ""] 1. d4 f5 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 d5. Nf3 c6 Or you can play as you have shown and don't have to worry about dxc5 (it actually isn't such a good move): [FEN ""] 1. d4 c5 2. dxc5?! e6 3. Nc3 (3. b4?...


10

In Volume 1 of his high-quality series on the Grünfeld for black, GM Avrukh recommends 3....b5!?, "playing in the spirit of the Benko Gambit". On page 6 of the PDF excerpt, you can find his analysis. However, this may not be to everyone's taste. Instead, he also gives the line 3....c6 4.Nc3 cxd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 Bg7 etc... "with equal chances". To me, this ...


9

I don't think 1.d4 itself really makes the game slower; you can use 1.d4 to play aggressive chess. Kasparov and Alekhine did. Likewise, you can play positional chess with 1.e4, e.g. Ruy Lopez, (especially Karpov's handling of it). So if you want to practice positional chess you don't need to switch to 1.d4, and if you switch to 1.d4 without changing your ...


9

You seem to enjoy tactical play, so there are a few options for you against 1. d4. As it appears you prefer gambits over other openings, consider looking at the relatively offbeat Budapest Gambit which is characterized by the opening moves 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e5 where after 3. dxe5 black can reply with either 3...Ne4 or 3...Ng4 with the latter being more popular....


9

It needs to be as much similar to the Caro-Kann as possible (since I already play the Caro-Kann against 1. e4). Impossible. The problem with this approach is that you have already stopped e4 with ...d5 so White simply can not transpose even if he wished to do so. Your best bet is the Slav defense, as it is very similar to Caro-Kann ( same pawn structure for ...


9

As you mentioned, 7.Qc2 a6 8.Qxc4 and 7.Qa4 a6 8.Qxc4 lead to the same position. However, after 7.Qc2 a6, white has the option to play 8.a4, which is recommended by GM Avrukh in Grandmaster Repertoire 1A: The Catalan. According to the Game Database of ChessTempo, 8.a4 is a bit more popular than 8.Qxc4. Having the choice of 8.a4 and 8.Qxc4 is probably the ...


8

The Catalan usually results in black exchanging his d5 pawn on c4, which leads to some pretty clear strategic goals on both side. White plays for control of the e4 square to support the e-pawn, and pressuring the d5 pawn with pieces. Black's freeing lever is c5, and thematic play centers around this push. If black can succeed, he often tries to expand ...


8

I like to play Benoni, because black has many chances to win. Also it is very asymmetrical from the pawn structure, so the chance to play draw isn't really high. [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4. Nc3 exd5 5. cxd5 d6 You just have to be careful, with the white d pawn. Never ever let it to d6. You will play g6 with Bg7. If everything goes right, you ...


8

I've used BDG countless number of times and won virtually everytime over weaker players. This is a dangerous opening if Black simply plays normal development moves, quite tricky to play in a 5-minute blitz game. White has to attack because he is a pawn down. The most direct and surprisingly effective setup is: Position the light bishop on the d3-h7 ...


8

After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Bg5, the position resembles the Tromposvky Attack (1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5), where white often gives up the bishop pair in exchange for a lead in development and the center. For example, one main line goes 2....e6 3.e4 h6 4.Bxf6 Qxf6. However, in the position after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Bg5, the move c4 doesn't fit well in this plan. Moreover, ...


8

it's actually impossible to keep the material advantage since after 9.dxc5 black has the move 9...Qa5 which puts a second attacker to the c3 pawn and also prepares to recapture the c5 pawn. All that white would be doing is giving up the strong center which is a huge deal in this line of the Grunfeld. Black, on the other hand, would be left with a more active ...


7

Additionally to Andrew's answer, I'd suggest to have a look at the Benko Gambit (a.k.a. Volga Gambit): [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 It is a sound and deep opening. If the gambit is accepted, it leads to sharp play and dynamic positions.


6

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. f3 The first two moves signify an A56 Benoni but 3. f3 does not show up in my database as a typical continuation. 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 is a playable E60 King's Indian. 3. ... Bg7 is a good followup for Black. 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. f3 The first two moves signify an E00 Queen's pawn game and are very drawish. 3. f3 is not a ...


6

If you have no real opening knowledge anyway, switching shouldn't be any special problem. Just start playing it, and afterwards you lookup what the pros do in the opening you played. You could also get a book. I think that until you're rated 1900 or so (and possibly until much higher), all you need is a book that explains the ideas behind all the openings. ...


6

Is it too dangerous for white? Yes. what are the ideas for white? Try to use your open lines and get good piece play, I suppose. Black is already better, though (up a central pawn with no weaknesses), so you shouldn't expect to succeed. And what is the winning percentage for white? In my database it is 19%. Is it still played among titled players?...


6

Try the Dutch Stonewall. If you are a French player, you can play the move order 1. d4 e6. After 2. e4 you have a French, after 2. c4 f5 you are in a dutch, avoiding the staunton gambit (not a problem in its own, but if you prefer solid play ...) After that, with a stonewall setup you have a solid middlegame, albeit a little passive PS: I am 1900 too.


6

Your bishop can be chased with h6, g5 and h5, after what white barely equalizes. It also gives black calm options, for example some c5 with Qa5 ans Ne4 ideas. It's just committing the bishop too early. So yes, it's typical position on why 'knights first' often works!


5

Please get yourself a copy of Avrukh's 1.d4 book and also see the games of Anand-Topalov 2010 Wch match, which are really instructive for seeing the themes of the Catalan. If you want to follow a strong exponent of the Catalan, check out Kramnik's games.


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