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19

Unfortunately for you, there is no such opening. You see, the problem with 1.d4 is that d pawn is protected from the very start, unlike his "colleague" e pawn. While it is possible to cut down on theory learning against 1.e4 by simply attacking the e pawn ( Alekhine's defense, Scandinavian defense, Petroff defense in a way ) thus forcing White's response, ...


18

9.dxc5? is a horrible positional blunder. The Grunfeld for black allows white a big center, and his idea is to chip away at it, or force it to advance, and then chip away at it. That center controls a lot of nice squares, and is very desirable. 9.dxc5? by white voluntarily does what black is trying to achieve in a very bad way, and worse, it turns the Bg7 ...


18

Chess strategy is complex and has several ingredients mingling at the same time. It is true that 3 c3 helps white mantaining two center pawns if black decides for a c:d4 pawn exchange. But black isn't forced to that and the move c3 has some incovenients. To list just two: blocks the c3 square which is the natural place for developing the Q-side knight; ...


15

In the vast majority of the cases, 4....d6 and 4....0-0 transpose into each other. However, with 4....0-0 black keeps the option of playing c6 and d5. Recently, this idea has been played by GM Jobava, known for his original approach in the opening: Lupulescu-Jobava, So-Jobava and Vitiugov-Jobava. About the last game, chess.com comments "Just giving away ...


13

You can play the Stonewall defence with black as well, as quid suggested. You can start with a Dutch and get the familiar structure (just an example): [FEN ""] 1. d4 f5 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 d5. Nf3 c6 Or you can play as you have shown and don't have to worry about dxc5 (it actually isn't such a good move): [FEN ""] 1. d4 c5 2. dxc5?! e6 3. Nc3 (3. b4?...


13

Black gains a tempo. Black has played two bishop moves, but white has played Nc3, a3, and bxc3. Once the smoke clears, black has a lead in development with one minor piece out (vs none) and can immediately castle. Also, it doesn’t hurt that the doubled pawns are a weakness that can be exploited later. If white does not play a3, black has no immediate need ...


12

I don't think it's a good idea. Firstly, no 1.d4 player will go for 2.e4, unless they are also 1.e4 players and really, really good at playing against the Caro-Kann. More importantly, you may like to play the Slav against d4+c4, and the Caro against d4+e4, but so far white has only played 1.d4. You lose options in case white doesn't follow up with a quick ...


11

After 3.cxd5 exd5 4.Nc3, if black plays 4....Nf6 or 4....Be7, then white indeed succesfully transposed to the mainlines of the QGD and avoided any transpositions to the Slav. Black's best reply is probably 4....c6, after which white has 3 good options: 5.Nf3, 5.Bf4 and 5.Qc2. After 5.Nf3 black can play 5....Bd6 or 5....Bf5. After 5.Bf4 black's best moves ...


10

I've used BDG countless number of times and won virtually everytime over weaker players. This is a dangerous opening if Black simply plays normal development moves, quite tricky to play in a 5-minute blitz game. White has to attack because he is a pawn down. The most direct and surprisingly effective setup is: Position the light bishop on the d3-h7 ...


10

In Volume 1 of his high-quality series on the Grünfeld for black, GM Avrukh recommends 3....b5!?, "playing in the spirit of the Benko Gambit". On page 6 of the PDF excerpt, you can find his analysis. However, this may not be to everyone's taste. Instead, he also gives the line 3....c6 4.Nc3 cxd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 Bg7 etc... "with equal chances". To me, this ...


9

It needs to be as much similar to the Caro-Kann as possible (since I already play the Caro-Kann against 1. e4). Impossible. The problem with this approach is that you have already stopped e4 with ...d5 so White simply can not transpose even if he wished to do so. Your best bet is the Slav defense, as it is very similar to Caro-Kann ( same pawn structure for ...


9

Bent Larsen explained it like this. If you want to win as Black you must unbalance the position, and this involves giving something to get something. Giving your opponent the two Bishops is something that you can do without a great deal of risk, because the advantage will probably not be significant until the endgame, and White must first of all get to an ...


8

After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Bg5, the position resembles the Tromposvky Attack (1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5), where white often gives up the bishop pair in exchange for a lead in development and the center. For example, one main line goes 2....e6 3.e4 h6 4.Bxf6 Qxf6. However, in the position after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Bg5, the move c4 doesn't fit well in this plan. Moreover, ...


8

As you mentioned, 7.Qc2 a6 8.Qxc4 and 7.Qa4 a6 8.Qxc4 lead to the same position. However, after 7.Qc2 a6, white has the option to play 8.a4, which is recommended by GM Avrukh in Grandmaster Repertoire 1A: The Catalan. According to the Game Database of ChessTempo, 8.a4 is a bit more popular than 8.Qxc4. Having the choice of 8.a4 and 8.Qxc4 is probably the ...


8

it's actually impossible to keep the material advantage since after 9.dxc5 black has the move 9...Qa5 which puts a second attacker to the c3 pawn and also prepares to recapture the c5 pawn. All that white would be doing is giving up the strong center which is a huge deal in this line of the Grunfeld. Black, on the other hand, would be left with a more active ...


7

Is it too dangerous for white? Yes. what are the ideas for white? Try to use your open lines and get good piece play, I suppose. Black is already better, though (up a central pawn with no weaknesses), so you shouldn't expect to succeed. And what is the winning percentage for white? In my database it is 19%. Is it still played among titled players?...


7

If you're a Benoni player, there's nothing wrong with 2... c5, which will get you in familiar territory (3. dxc6 e.p. is harmless and not something White wants to play - exchanging a center pawn for a flank pawn). While it's not a great move, Black isn't immediately better, just about equal. So it's dangerous to try to 'punish' this move, especially if ...


7

The most direct way to punish this move seems to be to attack the d-pawn immediately. Black gets a very slight advantage. For example [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. d5 c6! 3. c4 cxd5 4. cxd5 Qa5 + 5. Nc3 b5! 6. Qd3 b4 7. Qb5 Qb6 8. Qxb6 axb6 9. Nb5 Ra5 10. e4 Nxe4 I'd recommend that you run this line by the engines. They do tend to agree that this line gives ...


6

On top of the exciting Benko gambit, you can consider the Albin counter-gambit. Also, check out the Botvinnik variation. The Grunfeld variation is also an interesting option for sharp play. Here are the starting moves of the Albin counter-gambit: [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5


6

It is a well deserved doubt that you have in this position. As a Catalan player, I like both continuations (i.e. Qxd8 or Nc3) for well defined reasons. First one important note on Catalan openings or similar positions: White's play evolves around the positional play of minor pieces. Meaning in any position resulting from a Catalan, you should reason by ...


6

Try the Dutch Stonewall. If you are a French player, you can play the move order 1. d4 e6. After 2. e4 you have a French, after 2. c4 f5 you are in a dutch, avoiding the staunton gambit (not a problem in its own, but if you prefer solid play ...) After that, with a stonewall setup you have a solid middlegame, albeit a little passive PS: I am 1900 too.


6

It's actually a less flexible move order. The bishop will go to g7 in either case, but now black can't go ...d5 in one go. Only play this if you want to put the bishop on e7 (the Old Indian Defense)


6

Your bishop can be chased with h6, g5 and h5, after what white barely equalizes. It also gives black calm options, for example some c5 with Qa5 ans Ne4 ideas. It's just committing the bishop too early. So yes, it's typical position on why 'knights first' often works!


6

Are there strong responses different from 4. .. e6 for black against 4. g3 that avoid the Catalan? 4...Bf5 One interesting alternative is 4...Bf5, with very original play. Before playing e6, Black wants to develop and exchange its "bad" bishop; a move favored by top GMs such as Nakamura, Karjakin or Inarkiev. [fen ""] [title "Mamedyarov (2760) vs. ...


5

Problem with d-pawn openings is that you won't get away without learning substantial amount of theory.This goes true for every single line from systems like Stonewall and Colle to Queen's Indian Defense. I don't really know of a system which doesn't require the enormous amount theory generally associated with d-pawn openings. Chigorin has very little theory ...


5

If you want a variation that is rarely seen but still offers decent positions (depending on the strength of your opponent of course) you can try [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6 Yet, if you want good attacking chances, then you can try the Dutch system [FEN ""] 1.d4 f5 or [FEN ""] 1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5 The Dutch system does contain some theory. At the same time, ...


5

The g3 and Bg2 setup is strong defensively and strong offensively. White wants to play e4 to challenge the f5 pawn and Black's kingside white square complex. g3 and Bg2 is one of the best ways to support e4 with Nd2/c3 and Qc2 along with defending the king.


5

Optimal piece setup in openings are determined by pawn structures. If you compare the common pawn structures of the openings KID, Gruenfeld, Queen's Gambit, Queen's Indian with the Dutch you will notice a substantial difference: The existence of the black f5-pawn and white's pawn on e2 rather than e4. The black pawn structure of Stonewall Dutch is usualy c6-...


5

I feel that the most ambitious, principled and aggressive 1.d4 repertoire is the one given by John Cox in his book "Starting Out: 1.d4!". Of course these are the most ambitious lines for white in chess so they have also got extreme amounts of published theory and as they lead to very sharp positions, not knowing the theory may lead to quick losses for white. ...


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