24

"Reversed" Openings in general A black defense and its white mirror counterpart will often play out quite differently (compare the rather sharp Sicilian Defense and the rather quiet English Opening). The right to move matters, in both ways. By moving, you give away information to your opponent - the set of variations you can choose from shrinks with every ...


23

At a basic level, what we want from an opening and a defense, is: we want to be fighting for the center squares (1), we're trying to develop our pieces and get good squares for them (2), and thirdly, we want to have a safe king (3). This is as modest a expectation as one can have for a good opening. Now roughly speaking, there are two types of defenses (say ...


20

First of all, the isolated pawn is a dynamic strength, and a static weakness. But what does this mean? This means that he represents a pawn weakness, but compensates this weakness in some other way. In short, Black should strive towards endgame, while White must obtain some sort of pressure/attack in order to compensate for his weak d-pawn. Why is this ...


20

This is ctg format property, or bug, if you like. There were no games played with 14.Bf4 and as well there were no games played with 14...Qd8. The ctg tree just knows position after 14...Qd8. Certainly it happens via different move order. So in 196 games wasn't played 14...Qd8, but 196 games saw the position arising after 14...Qd8. This position arises in ...


12

I don't think it's a good idea. Firstly, no 1.d4 player will go for 2.e4, unless they are also 1.e4 players and really, really good at playing against the Caro-Kann. More importantly, you may like to play the Slav against d4+c4, and the Caro against d4+e4, but so far white has only played 1.d4. You lose options in case white doesn't follow up with a quick ...


12

Against a white d4-e5 pawn formation, Black wants to play c5 (see e.g. the French opening). In the Caro-Kann, that will cost two moves (c7-c6-c5), while in the Scandinavian, it's only one move since the pawn is still on c7. That's one tempo, and as @Qudit notes in the comments, in the main line Scandinavian White usually wins a tempo by chasing the black ...


12

Well, it is a small sample, but assuming that there are a lot more games like these, I think it could be the following things. First, I am not sure when we first humans first decided that space was an advantage, but for as long as I have been playing, it has been a known factor. Both of these openings cede space compared to double-king-pawn openings and ...


10

OK, after reading your reply to my question above, I can more accurately answer. First, contrary to Fuxia's comment, the move you played, 4...Nc6, is actually more popular now at higher levels than Botvinnik's 4...e6. To quote GM John Shaw's 2016 book: 4...Nc6 is more popular these days and can be viewed as slightly more ambitious, as well as somewhat ...


10

Because of the enormous skill difference between these computers and humans, any kind of analysis will inevitably be post-hoc. We can tell ourselves stories about how "Stockfish should have [insert plan]," (and I'm sure some people here will) but ultimately I think that any story we could come up with would be flawed at the level of Leela/Stockfish. This isn'...


10

The main reasons it is OK for black is that he is still down only one tempo in piece development, but he has traded off his bad bishop for white's good bishop, and his position is still very solid so he will catch up in development eventually. The downside is that white has more space. Black can eventually fight back with c5 after finishing his development, ...


9

It needs to be as much similar to the Caro-Kann as possible (since I already play the Caro-Kann against 1. e4). Impossible. The problem with this approach is that you have already stopped e4 with ...d5 so White simply can not transpose even if he wished to do so. Your best bet is the Slav defense, as it is very similar to Caro-Kann ( same pawn structure for ...


9

5.c4 is bad in the Smyslov variation because black can equalize instantly with 5...e5! 6. dxe5 Qa5+ and 7...Qxe5. Black is not better though, it merely gives black an easy game with the queens off. For the complete line: [Fen ""] [Title "Smyslov Variation"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. c4 e5 6. dxe5 Qa5+ 7. Bd2 Qxe5 8. Qe2 Nc5 9. Nxc5 ...


9

You are the author of a series of questions of the type "What is the most boring way to play" and whereas I am fond of positional play as well, I must say that the way the question is formulated is completely wrong. I played the Caro-Kann for years and there is simply no way to avoid an heated battle in some variations, unless you are ready to make a lot of ...


9

Generally speaking, Leela tends to have a better "intuition" and Stockfish is very good at brute force calculations. So in a structure like the French/Caro-Kann, where calculation becomes less important and strategy becomes more important, Leela will tend to do better.


8

EDIT ( December, 30 2013 ): Removed unnecessary book from the list Added explanation of basic ideas in response to the comment made by member Jonathan Garber I would like to play the Modern Variation of the Caro-Kann. What is the best way to deal with Ng5? Best strategy and known tactics (e.g. the Ne6 sacrifice). You did not specify which side you wish ...


8

Soltis' Pawn Structure Chess is a good book which treats all the common pawn structures that arise from popular openings. Its focus truly is on the pawn structures themselves and typical plans associated with them, rather than on the particular opening move-orders by which they arise. And the structure described in your question is treated in section "C. The ...


8

The Caro-Kann: Move by Move is a good resource for the Caro-Kann. The repertoire covered has winning chances but is very solid. (Just make sure your rating is at least 1500; below that, learning opening is not ideal.)


8

Where the knights go depends on your pawn structure. One option is to do the following, at some point e7-e6 Nb8-d7 Ng8-e7 c6-c5 Ne7-c6 You get a French defence pawn structure with corresponding ideas. You could go for the same pawn structure with a different knight setup. e7-e6 c6-c5 Nb8-c6 Ng8-e7 Ne7-f5 Putting pressure on the d4 square.


8

1. c3 (and 1. d3 and 1. e3, which can lead to reversed Pircs, French defense or QGD) aren't bad in that they give White a worse position. So those moves might have some merit as a surprise weapon (if you don't do it too often). But they do offer Black the advantage of setting the first foot in the center and the possibility to defend it, which is normally ...


8

c4 is the usual beginner's mistake of releasing the tension unnecessarily. With the pawn on c5 you exert some pressure on d4 which can be increased with moves like Ne7-c6. When the pawn moves to c4 that pressure disappears. If you played Ne7 instead then taking the c5 pawn is bad for white. You are not going to retake immediately but instead play Nc6. This ...


7

I can think of a couple counter arguments against what your friend says: 1) Sure in the Caro-Kann you can easily develop your Bishop outside the pawn chain, but there are several variations where the Bishop ends up being a target when developed to f5. The most prominent example is in the advance Caro-Kann: [fen ""] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Nc3 e6 5. ...


7

Based on the sentence syntax I don't believe that the author is intending to make a connection between the mentioned opening systems and positional skills. Every strong player must have good positional skills and must also be a good tactician. You could not become a world class player without both. Both of these openings do have strong positional ideas and ...


7

There is some analysis at the Kenilworthian blog. See http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/games/java/2007/caro-adv-h4.htm http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/games/java/2011/cavewoman.htm http://www.kenilworthchessclub.org/games/java/2013/complete-caveman.htm http://kenilworthian.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/the-complete-caveman-caro-kann_20.html Download for the ...


7

This line, the Botvinnik-Carls Defense, is my pet opening as Black. :) The critical move after 4.dxc5 is e6! If White tries to hold the pawn with Be3, you answer that with Nd7. In many lines after that you have a way to get the pawn back or get the bishop pair and a much better pawn structure. See the annotated example below. [Result "*"] [Annotator "...


7

You're right that players who choose 1...c6 must be fine with the Caro-Kann, which is one reason why it's not that popular. However, there are some people who are fine with the Caro-Kann, and so the move gets played occasionally. In the case of 2.c4, there aren't many benefits I can see for Black. He has the option of playing a la King's Indian with ...Nf6, ....


6

The move 4. g4 is slightly dubious compared to the more solid option of 4. Nc3 (among Nc3), as it forces white to play 5. f3 if black opts for the mainline 4... Be4. Therefore I recommend this choice in general. It does, to an extent, weaken the idea of e6. However, 4... Bg6 is an option and a more common one at that. The pawn sacrifice is actually quite ...


6

The g4 line is called the Spike Variation of the Caro-Kannn(B10). Commonly played line is 2...d5 with e5 there after. White gives up development of pieces for more spatial control.


6

According to the Game Database of ChessTempo, the mainlines of 6...Bb4 and 6....Be7 are quite similar: 6....Be7 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Bd3 Nc6 9.0-0 6....Bb4 7.cxd5 Nxd5 8.Bd2 Nc6 9.Bd3 0-0 10.0-0 Remarkably, the main move for the second line is 10....Be7, which transposes to the first line, but with an extra Bd2 for white. For instance, Nakamura-Wojtaszek and ...


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