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Question: What are black's possible plans in the exchange variation of the Queen's Gambit? I think the positions could be classified into two main types depending upon where White develops the g1 knight - f3 or e2. A) Black's ideas when White develops Knight on f3 1) Knight mavouvere - d7-f8-e6-g7 followed by Bf5! A very interesting idea was introduced ...


16

The Albin Countergambit is not to be feared, particularly. White does quite well after the simple 3. dxe5. My chess database of master games shows that white wins or draws 80% of the games after 3. ... d4 which is Black's best response. Now, before I go down the rabbit hole, please bear in mind that strong masters probably don't visit this site. For ...


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In this case, the answer is "gain familiarity with the standard strategical themes of the chosen opening". Black's #1 issue in the Queen's Gambit Declined is what to do with his light-squared bishop, which if ignored can easily get stuck behind the e6 pawn and often a c6 pawn. The two standard ways to free it are Play ...e5 to allow the bishop to move ...


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This answer is something of a kindred spirit to those already given by dfan and jedrus07; both of their answers focus on your light-square bishop, with dfan addressing the big strategic picture that often revolves around that piece and jedrus07 focusing on the concrete pickle it ended up in by the end. I want to share a few thoughts on how its fate and yours ...


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It's really unknown, I've never seen it actually played except for maybe one or two internet blitz games out of ten thousand. But I've looked up some lines for you. You play 3.cxd5 and now black needs to decide what to do. The symmetrical 3...cxd4 4.Qxd4 followed by e4 just loses a pawn. 3...Qxd5 allows white to chase the queen, getting a lead in ...


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After 3.cxd5 exd5 4.Nc3, if black plays 4....Nf6 or 4....Be7, then white indeed succesfully transposed to the mainlines of the QGD and avoided any transpositions to the Slav. Black's best reply is probably 4....c6, after which white has 3 good options: 5.Nf3, 5.Bf4 and 5.Qc2. After 5.Nf3 black can play 5....Bd6 or 5....Bf5. After 5.Bf4 black's best moves ...


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I didn't like your 14... Nf8. Would have played g6 (as you later did). IMHO, White won the game by playing, 18. c5 which your N on d7 was posted to prevent. This is a strategic, not tactical issue. For a more tactical opening, I would have refrained from 3....d5, playing b6 instead, and aimed for Queen's Indian with 4. ... B b7 or a Nimzo-Indian with 4.......


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Since you are playing the Queen Gambit, 2.c4 is indeed the most logical way to continue. The main answers, 2...d5 and 2...Nf6, should fit in your repertoire anyway. The alternative is to go for 2.Nf3 first. Move order finesses Black's move order bears three subtelties: You are offered a choice to switch to a French opening with 2.e4. This is probably your ...


9

Declining the gambit Not really. White is at an advantage accepting, and will fall to a disadvantage if the gambit is declined. Maintaining a closed position Well, considering White aggressively played 1. d4 .. 2. c4 there is no closing this position up. The rest of the game will be open. Maybe 3. e3 This option is so-so. [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e5 3. ...


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A flexible and well respected approach is to take the e-pawn, put knights on f3 and d2, and follow up with a king side fianchetto. You will find this article very useful on how to deal with it. Patience is the key. Don't try to "refute" it as soon as you can. It is a perfectly playable opening for black. But play prophylactic moves that develop and reduced ...


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INTRODUCTION AND RELEVANT INFORMATION: Exchange variation of the Queen’s Gambit Declined can be reached via many move orders so there is no point in posting theoretical lines here since they will not fit ( they are too broad ). The best way to answer this question is to actually explain how to play positions that arise. To start explaining this line, the ...


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It is not so easy to develop c8 bishop to f5 or g4 in any of these systems. You run into many tactics like Nh4 winning bishop on f5 for a knight, f3 e4 as in open Slav or Qb3 Ne5 stuff with bishop on g4. The bishop is often developed to b7 in both semislav and QGD. It is safe and effective square for him. It is better to have the bishop passive for a while ...


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Soltis' Pawn Structure Chess is a good book which treats all the common pawn structures that arise from popular openings. Its focus truly is on the pawn structures themselves and typical plans associated with them, rather than on the particular opening move-orders by which they arise. And the structure described in your question is treated in section "C. The ...


8

Black can sometimes hold on to the Pawn if that is the goal. Black has to play an early a6 and b5. One possible variation is: [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 a6 4. e3 b5 Although Black will hold on to the extra C-Pawn, White can counterattack with a4, b3, and Nc3. Black has neglected development, and according to MegaBase 2012, White scores 60.6% ...


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A Gambit is a chess opening where a pawn is sacrificed in order to grab the initiative. The Queen's Gambit is called a Gambit because White sacrifices the c-pawn in order to get a better control over the center. [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 After Black has accepted the pawn with dxc4, the consequence is pretty clear i.e., without a pawn on d5 Black has less ...


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That is the Slav, but the problem for black in many of these lines, and specifically immediately, is that if 3...Bf5, then 4.cd cd 5.Qb3 forces you to sacrifice d5 or b7 since 5...b6 just loses. [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Bf5 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Qb3! b6? 6.e4! (6.Nc3) Bxe4 (6...dxe4 7.Ne5+-) 7.Ne5 a6 8.Ba6! Ra6 9.Qb5 Nd7 10.Nd7! Qd7 (10......


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The symmetrical defense is my favorite, here is how games with me playing as black usually turn out: [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c5 3.dxc5 d4 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.e3 e5 6.exd4 exd4 This line of play of course requires white to play 3. dxc5: it is quite a common variation I find. White cannot defend the c5 pawn effectively and black has a clearly dominant position ...


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The fact that a gambit involves a sacrifice in no way means that the sacrifice is permanent. Very few mainline gambit openings for White leave the gambit player with no means of retaking his material. While Wikipedia does not necessarily make the distinction between a gambit and a sacrifice, I would contend that there is a difference: A sacrifice is ...


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Based on the sentence syntax I don't believe that the author is intending to make a connection between the mentioned opening systems and positional skills. Every strong player must have good positional skills and must also be a good tactician. You could not become a world class player without both. Both of these openings do have strong positional ideas and ...


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Spassky had an entire squad of Soviet grandmasters trying to find holes in Fischer's repertoire. So it made a lot of sense to surprise them. He also avoided the sharp King's Indian and went for the Nimzo instead. There are other examples for this strategy. Peter Leko, a 1.e4 player, switched to 1.d4 for his match against Kramnik. Changing the black ...


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I don't know really know the theory here, but I can give some pointers. Maybe they are of some use for you or other readers. The setup with c6/d5/e6 in the first three moves against white's d4 and c4 is called the Triangle; usually black wants to aim for the Noteboom variation (1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 dxc4 and roll with the queenside pawns). 4.e4 is ...


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It depends a little. The Queen's Gambit can lead to very lively play, if both parties are willing, but it's easier to turn it positional, as the Queen's Gambit is more of a "pseudo-gambit" than the King's Gambit; White will almost always be able to regain his pawn if it's taken, even without going all out for blood. The King's Gambit is different. White ...


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It's a good question. Just a quick answer with some thoughts to give you some starting ideas, hopefully to be improved later. I've always liked the English exactly for its rich transpositional possibilities, they're endless aren't they? Your intent to divert towards d4 lines via the English is very common. For example Magnus Carlsen often employs it to ...


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If you don't take on d5, I think the only advantage black has gained is flexibility. That means he can choose his opening according to your move. But you can be almost 100% sure that the opening will be transposed into some traditional line so white can't be worse, for example: Slav Defence: [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nf6?! 3. Nc3 (3. Nf3 c6) c6 {with the ...


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It is really a matter of taste over "better". I like the tempo gain that dxc4 gives. Usually the pawn is on c4 before Bf1-d3, but when Bf1 develops, as in your game, it loses time capturing on c4. Additionally, the Bishop sucks on c4 and will likely move yet again. Black will have time to play c5 with a nice game.


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I'm not sure which database you are looking at: I see 3.e4 as the second, not third, most popular choice on chess.com, though not by much: Here's what one author says about 3.Nf3: Throughout the history of the Queen’s Gambit Accepted, this has been White’s most popular move in this position. White does not hurry to win back the pawn that he has ...


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It seems to be that the QGD is regaining some popularity at the top level due to theory advancing. I don't think that says anything about the overall popularity of the two openings though (i.e., including all players). The increase in engines' powers have made playing the semi-slav a very treacherous choice. There's a lot more that super GMs need to know ...


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Chess.com listed this as an inaccuracy because the engine is running at a limited depth, only looking at each move for a few seconds. When I put the position after 5...Bg4 into Stockfish, it gave an evaluation of +0.12 at 16 ply. But at 18 ply, the evaluation dropped to -0.38. Most likely if you had run the analysis at "maximum" (which I realize is locked ...


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There are ways to hold onto the pawn, but most of them leave Black with a dreadful position where his entire position is built around hanging onto the pawn. Moves like Be6, c6, b5, and Qa5 are examples of strategies that could be employed. In the Slav and Semi-Slav defenses, there are in fact a lot of variations in which black is able to comfortably (...


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I think that this question really highlights the value of the initiative and the white pieces. In the Exchange QGD, the position is nearly equal according to theory, while in the Caro Kann, the position is nearly equal according to theory ...complicated. I don't know of any books that compare the two simply because the Panov is still available. It can get ...


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