32

But why did Garry Kasparov not play under the flag of Azerbaijan? Because his FIDE registration is with Russia. If he wants to change his registration to Azerbaijan then the following also have to happen - 1) He has to have a valid claim like residency, nationality or birth, so birth would do. 2) Azerbaijan chess federation have to agree. 3) An ...


25

Shirov resigned: the thinking was that despite both sides left with pawns and a knight, the advantage went to Black. Black has an extra pawn and Black's pawn chain is mutually supporting. White is down a pawn and they are split. White's king is buried too deeply in the corner to either prevent a black pawn advance to promotion or to save White's pawns. ...


22

Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine is a decent enough documentary on the subject. The coverage does kind of imply that Kasparov was grasping at straws abit. Like a typical World championship match there was a lot of behind the scenes tactics going on from both sides. My feeling is that you only have to look at the ascent of Anand and other chess players ...


19

I am surprised that the paper "Intrinsic Chess Ratings" by Ken Regan and Guy Haworth hasn't been posted yet. It is exactly what's asked for, serious research into rating inflation. PDF Basically they got games from three periods (1976-1979, 1991-1994, 2006-2009), in several rating ranges (e.g. both players within 10 points of 2200, within 10 points of 2300, ...


19

He is talking about the score after the sixth game of each of his matches with Karpov. To be precise, these were the scores after game six (shown as Kasparov-Karpov, not counting draws, to follow the same convention as the quote from the book): 1984: 0-2 1985: 1-2 1986: 1-1 1987: 1-2 1990: 1-0 As you can see, Kasparov was behind after the sixth game in ...


16

I like your question a lot. Though I don't play either side of any 1. e4 e5 openings, it got me thinking about the motivations behind playing the Scotch Game. Though you were clearly happy with the answer you accepted, I'm adding another answer because I don't personally understand how that one addresses the question as you asked it, and I think some further ...


14

IBM claimed the machine could search for 200 million moves per second, while Stockfish in the recent AlphaZero match could "only" search for 80 million per seconds on a modern multi-core machines. But... it was unclear how exactly IBM derived the number. There's no universe definition on how an engine calculates number of moves per second. How it's done is ...


13

If white ever trades her rook for black's knight, the game is lost. The only move for her is thus 91.Rf8, which is answered by 92.Kg6 Rg8+ 93.Kf7 resulting in the following position: [FEN "1r2n1RK/5k2/8/8/8/8/8/8 w - - 66 93 "] 1. Rg1 (1.Rxe8 Rxe8 2.Kh7 Re6 3.Kh8 Rh6#) (1.Rg7 Nxg7 2.Kh7 Rb6 3.Kh8 Rh6#) (1.Kh7 Nf6+) Nf6 2. Rg8 Rxg8# and now any rook move ...


13

Black has (almost) three connected passed pawns which will be unstoppable. White is not going to promote his pawn without the king, which is far away and likewise is not going to get a passer on the a or b file soon.


12

I poked around some. You've probably seen these pages, but I'll post them anyway: a. This page will interest you. It includes a photocopy of a letter from Elo himself stating the possibility: Thus over time the rating scale could drift unless some measures are taken to stabilize it. He further mentions that the ratings scale has no anchor, no fixed ...


11

Kasparov's reason for that statement may be no deeper than this: The current rating list does give a concrete, factual basis for his assessment, though it is certainly something with which others might disagree. Current world #2 Levon Aronian, for one, made a point of contradicting Kasparov: "I don’t think [what Kasparov said] is true. The player that ...


10

It isn't hard to find machines/programs rated 2200+ nowadays, so yes machines can beat masters. Kasparov's comments versus Deep Blue are sour grapes. Kasparov once boasted that a machine could not beat him because he could create and a machine could not. He failed to realize that sufficiently deep tactics are indistinguishable from creation ;-)


7

Based on the sentence syntax I don't believe that the author is intending to make a connection between the mentioned opening systems and positional skills. Every strong player must have good positional skills and must also be a good tactician. You could not become a world class player without both. Both of these openings do have strong positional ideas and ...


7

I thought that Nigel Short summed it up pretty well here: http://www.chess.com/news/breaking-ilyumzhinov-beats-kasparov-110-61-at-fide-presidential-elections-4528 "There's nothing wrong with chess players. If you ask in the playing hall, I'll bet 9 out of 10 will vote for Kasparov. The problem is: delegates. If the delegate has received an incentive to vote ...


7

The question therefore is, where did Kasparov misplay the position? No, he did not. All the lines give Black equal chances, no matter what move White chose to play. How did he lose his small positional advantage. He did not lose advantage because there was none in the first place. White position just looks "prettier". He can not stop the freeing d5 ...


7

Kasparov has been known to make controversial statements. He's just not politically correct. But it is the fact that the match winner will not be considered world strongest chess player by most. According to May 2012 FIDE Elo list Anand was no.4 and Gelfand no.20. The part about it being first time in long period of time is questionable, recent FIDE world ...


7

I believe he means that in one of his matches, he was ahead after the first six games had been played. In one of them, after six games were played the score was tied. In the remaining three, he was behind after the first six games.


6

I think in Yermolinski's "The Road to Chess Improvement" he says that he decided to follow "the most common advice one can find in the works of Alekhine and Botvinnik , which can be put into simple words - study your games". Of course Yermolinski takes it much further saying that "study your games" means to do a thorough analysis of each of your games even ...


6

This article from Chessbase answers most of your questions. This was the position in which Kasparov had set a "computer chess" trap. [fen "r1r1q1k1/6p1/p2b1p1p/1p1PpP2/PPp5/2P4P/R1B2QP1/R5K1 w - - 0 35"] [White "Deep Blue"] [Black "Gary Kasparov"] He was expecting 36. Qb6 Rd8 37. ab Rab8 38. Qxa6 e4 [fen "1r1rq1k1/6p1/Q2b1p1p/1P1P1P2/1Pp1p3/2P4P/...


6

I'd say no. Playing against a human being is a lot different than playing computers. Here is an article (unfortunately, it is in Dutch) about a German player with a rating under 2100 who regularly beat the top chess programs, by playing strange openings and long-term sacrifices. This was a few years after the Kasparov - Deep Blue match.


6

The position after move 9 is the main tabya of the Tarrasch defense. Your feeling that Black is better, or even that he has egalized, is imprecise : White has no weakness, active pieces, and Black's isolani is a long term target. The position is playable for both sides, its evaluation somewhere in between = and +=. Actually, Kasparov himself stopped playing ...


6

What would have been the ramifications of him making the move Qg7? That would be a really bad move. In a heartbeat his opponent would play Rg8 threatening to take the queen. The rook is protected by the knight on f6. The only move the queen has is to go back to h6 and then it is Topalov's move. All white has done is give away a tempo.


5

In absolute terms, Carlsen 2012 for sure is a stronger player than Kasparov 1985. If Carlsen 2012 travelled in time played a match with Kasparov 1986, Carlsen would defeat Kasparov. This is simply because the technology-assisted preparation is a lot more efficient, and Carlsen has also an edge in opening theory, because he has the accumulated knowledge 1987-...


5

I know this is a 2 year old post now, which I've visited a few times before now but now I couldn't resist posting my comment. The Scotch has been my favourite White opening for the last 3-4 years. I really like it and it helps me that top players(including Kasparov play it..not that I am anywhere near that standard!!). It can give an opening advantage, but ...


5

Kasparov accused Deep Blue of cheating, but I don't believe there is any evidence about this. Anything can happen on any day, so yes, a commercial software chess game running on a "common machine" can beat a chess master.


5

The following passage is from Botvinnik's foreword to his 100 Selected Games. The text here doesn't single out one's own games as the specific object of analysis, but it leaves no doubt about Botvinnik's belief that improving at analysis in general is crucial to becoming a strong player. I must mention one other possibility of achieving perfection which I ...


5

[FEN "1r2n1RK/8/7k/8/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Rf8 Kg6 2. Rg8+ Kf7 3. Rg1 Nf6+ (3. Kh7 Nf6+ 4. Kh6 Nxg8 (4...Rxg8??)) 4. Rg8 Rxg8#


5

Welcome to the world of the Isolated Queen Pawn (IQP for shorts)! This is a special type of position which can be reached from quite a few openings (also with reversed colours); the Tarrasch variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined, as in your game, the 2. c3 Sicilian, the Caro Kann, to name a few. Just like playing a violent kingside attack with lots of ...


4

Elo's system had two components. One was independent of history, the other was not. His system for creating a "performance rating" over the course of an event or a period of time had no historical component to it; it was simply a measure of performance over the specified time. (Memory fails me on this point, but I think when he was calculating the ratings ...


4

Deep blue was dismantled soon after playing Kasparov. So, I guess, we will never know what would have happened. However, if it does happen, then I would favour Carlsen winning against the computer. At the time that the match against Kasparov was played, computers weren't really stronger than humans. And to be honest, I think, Kasparov lost because of his ...


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