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20

If you don't mind going a bit earlier, then it has to be 1972 Spassky–Fischer (mother of all World Championships) Game 1. Fischer played 29...Bxh2? a move that few players would consider in light of the obvious 30.g3, trapping the bishop. EDIT Later analysis (Speelman 1981) showed that the game is not lost (and can be drawn with extremely precise play), ...


17

Kasparov's 7...h6? in the game below cost him the game and the match, and later Kasparov accused Deep Blue team of cheating. [FEN ""] [Event "IBM Man-Machine"] [Site "New York, NY USA"] [Date "1997.05.??"] [EventDate "?"] [Round "6"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Deep Blue (Computer)"] [...


11

We'll never know the whole truth of the 1951 world championship match. Years after the Soviet Union collapsed, and nearing death, Bronstein still wouldn't talk about it. The challenger Bronstein was the son of an imprisoned Jewish dissident, while champion Botvinnik was a model Soviet (dichotomy much the same as Korchnoi and Karpov in the '80s). In the ...


11

Not exactly what you're looking for, but in his 1987 match vs Karpov, Kasparov forgot to press his clock during time pressure. Kasparov finally lost that game, the result being heavily influenced by the clock's incident. https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1987-10-15-mn-14340-story.html https://apnews.com/d00b24ebff5eede461c2587317bcef62 That a ...


8

I thought that Nigel Short summed it up pretty well here: http://www.chess.com/news/breaking-ilyumzhinov-beats-kasparov-110-61-at-fide-presidential-elections-4528 "There's nothing wrong with chess players. If you ask in the playing hall, I'll bet 9 out of 10 will vote for Kasparov. The problem is: delegates. If the delegate has received an incentive to vote ...


6

The position after move 9 is the main tabya of the Tarrasch defense. Your feeling that Black is better, or even that he has egalized, is imprecise : White has no weakness, active pieces, and Black's isolani is a long term target. The position is playable for both sides, its evaluation somewhere in between = and +=. Actually, Kasparov himself stopped playing ...


5

Welcome to the world of the Isolated Queen Pawn (IQP for shorts)! This is a special type of position which can be reached from quite a few openings (also with reversed colours); the Tarrasch variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined, as in your game, the 2. c3 Sicilian, the Caro Kann, to name a few. Just like playing a violent kingside attack with lots of ...


5

This story has a very long pedigree going back much further than the GingerGM. The earliest reference I can find on the internet is from a November 1985 report on the Karpov v Kasparov match in People.com's archive - http://people.com/archive/anatoly-karpov-is-straining-in-vain-to-keep-his-world-chess-title-from-gary-kasparov-vol-24-no-20/ Unlike his ...


5

That's a lot, if validated. Karpov was rather slight at the time, something around 60kg or less, so that represents something under 20% of his body weight. And actually, that's consistent with other facts, given that was a 50+ game match. Fabiano Caruana says he can drop around 10% of his body weight during a difficult tournament. (Said to an ESPN reporter.)...


4

Regarding your question, as far as I remember, both lines hold. Bf5 gave White a lot of options to fight for an advantage. It got revamped with the help of the computers, Black seeking to generate more active counter-play by castling short instead of long, but I had no courage to try those positions out as they were too wild for my taste. Nd7 was regarded ...


3

IMO it is an overstatement to say that Karpov took no risks. Just to give one example which is curiously on topic, in one of his Caro games he played an early .. Ke8-e7 !? in order to connect his Rh8 to his Queen, and got an advantage that way. I would call his style "positional dynamic" or something like that. Perhaps the larger point is that in chess ...


3

Your question(s) seem to be related to 1.d4 in general. People have nicely answered issues with the Isolated Q Pawn, so I'll touch on other topics. Compared to 1.e4 , queen's pawn openings do not attempt to take advantage of immediate complications in the center. In Roy Lopez, White is playing against e5 right from the beginning, move after move. King's ...


2

From Fundamental Chess Openings (FCO) by Paul van der Sterren: "Theory of this opening system (which sadly lacks any widely accepted name) has been enriched with a huge number of sharp and original variations" Here he is referring to the Karpov variation (which now has a widely accepted name!). So it's definitely not slow and solid necessarily- white can ...


1

In Game 5 of Karpov vs. Korchnoi for the World Championship in 1978, Korchnoi missed a forced mate when he played Be4+ instead of Bf7+ on move 55. The game ended as a lengthy draw. https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1068051 The match was being played as first to 6 wins with draws not counting, and neither player had won a game out of the first ...


1

Unfortunately this example does not come from the 1985 match, but Kasparov arrived at the final game of the 1987 rematch needing to secure a win. He made an unusual choice by going for the English Opening for the first time ever against Karpov, ending in a great success. The game can be seen at https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1067242 Nobody ...


1

I could find replay of live videos, but the commentary wasn't available..! :/ here you can stream those videos Kasparov vs Karpov - Valencia, 2009


1

Without getting into the pros and cons of either candidate or, more to the point, the cons of the incumbant, there might still be some value in reading this account of the FIDE presidential election. The author, Kevin Bonham, is the delegate of the Australian Chess Federation and he's quite open about the attempts to sway his vote through bribery. He took ...


1

To me personally, Kirsan is the lesser devil of the two. Kasparov, as great a player as he was(greatest in my opinion), is a very volatile person and he's fighting Putin which occupies a majority of his time. He doesn't have the administrative qualities to lead a world chess organization and personality doesn't necessarily get you the FIDE president-ship. ...


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