10

It is probably not only about position, but how about playing for 7 hours, and you are positionally killing your opponent, and you slip up, throwing away all that work? Here are a couple positions that still probably qualify: [FEN "7k/7P/8/6K1/4B3/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] You would think that white should be able to win, but no. Or black here. [FEN "6K1/5P2/...


8

I can think of some: Time trouble causing blunders in general. Objectively you can have an advantage, but then having to convert/transform it could require an impractical level of calculation (such that no human could ever realistically win over the board with such an advantage). Some argue stalemate in general is wrong. Why should trapping the king be a ...


6

One thing I think is an injustice of chess is the rule enabling a player being able to get a 50-move draw even if their position is lost. (A "blessed loss" position; a "cursed win" from the point of the other player, who deserved the chance to try to execute a win.)


5

I have seen this referred to/attributed to a couple of Tal's games. It is quite likely that he used the saying more than once. If you study enough of Tal's games, you'll see that he developed a technique of not retracting his (minor) pieces when they were en prise. The first reference that I was able to find was in his Havana-1966 game against Bjorn Brinck-...


4

According to chesshistory.com, in October 1959, Al Horowitz wrote: It is axiomatic in chess that it is easier to achieve a winning game than to win it. One bad move nullifies 40 good ones, and precision technique is of the essence even when the game is well in hand. The same can be found in his book, “All About Chess”, written in 1971. However, in ...


3

Julian Hodgson has elaborated on this in his book "Attack with Julian Hodgson 2". He calls it the attack statistics box. Another writer who uses arithmatic to calculate positions and moves is Shashin in his book "Best Play: A New Method For Discovering The Strongest Move".


3

Finder's credit goes to Akavall. Kasparov's explanation of how he calculated an attack against Karpov appears to be the origin of the quote I've seen referenced. youtube.com/watch?v=SMe-hvCwTRo


1

Apparently this is a quote attributed to Alexander Alekhine: "To me, chess is not a game; it is art." http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lubomir-kavalek/chess-art-under-alekhines_b_3195822.html This is probably a translation from Russian (or maybe French?), so there also exists Brian Towers preferred version: "Chess for me is not a game, but an art. Yes, and I ...


1

I don't think anybody has made such a claim. "Chess is an art" is another matter. Vaclav Havel (former Czech prime minister) is supposed to have said that when he visited the Carlsbad tournament. Karpov is supposed to have said "Chess is everything - art, science, and sport." If anyone should know it would be Marcel Duchamp the artist who gave up art for ...


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