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14

I will assume here that you are talking about sacrificing pieces and not just pawns, which require less compensation. For a sacrifice to work out you generally need to either 1) checkmate the opposing king, or 2) eventually gain the material back. There are other scenarios, but they're less common and I will ignore them here. Often goal 2 occurs because ...


5

I have seen this referred to/attributed to a couple of Tal's games. It is quite likely that he used the saying more than once. If you study enough of Tal's games, you'll see that he developed a technique of not retracting his (minor) pieces when they were en prise. The first reference that I was able to find was in his Havana-1966 game against Bjorn Brinck-...


2

When you say the word "Chess Style " the kind of Play the Player will reveal. The Style means what kind of play he is adept with and he likes to play the most. Yes Styles can even be transitioned .e.g. Bobby changed his playing style and his opening repertoire in 1992 match against Spassky . Chess Style reflects your own Personality and brings out the facets ...


2

One of the better books on "judging" a sacrifice is "The Art of Sacrifice" by Rudolph Spielmann, even though it is a bit dated (1935). In a "non-gain" sacrifice, one doesn't really think of compensation. Instead, the mentality is, "can I get a winning attack?" Normally, the sacrifice is large enough so that if you don't win by attack, you will lose the game ...


2

Copying the openings of a famous player will "put you in his shoes," (as of the end of those moves). From then on, it's up to you. You may try to mold yourself after a particular player, but depending on your talent and aptitude, develop differently.


1

It depends on what you are looking for. Personally I like Attack with Mikhail Tal best because it is really an excellent textbook (or guide, see the introduction) on how to play attacking chess. So if you are looking to improve your own game, this is the book I would recommend. If on the other hand you are more interested in Tal himself and his career, his ...


1

Yes, to an extent. It's best to learn openings chronologically. If you're just starting out you should look at the era before Morphy. As you get better you can look at more modern openings. Doing it that way way you can see how the ideas build on the previous generation's ideas. Tal is probably most appropriate for the 1800-2200 range.


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